WATCH: Michael Andrew, Lilly King, US W 800 FR Relay Win Olympic Prelims Heats

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

Day 5 Prelims Recap

Hit snooze on your Tokyo 2020 prelims alarm this morning? Well, I did too. That’s okay, we can all watch selected day 5 prelims videos in this post.

In the first preliminary event, the women’s 100 free, 27-year-old Aussie veteran Emma McKeon roared a monster 52.13 to lead the semifinals seeds, break the Olympic record, and threaten the 2017 world record of 51.71.

Fast forward to the women’s 200 breast, American Lilly King won her prelims heat unscathed with a 2:22.10, easily qualifying for semifinals. In the last heat, South African Tatjana Schoenmaker made a statement after earning 100 breast silver by hitting the 200 breast Olympic record at 2:19.16, missing the 2013 world record by 0.05s.

In the men’s 200 IM preliminaries, both Americans Chase Kalisz and Michael Andrew won their respective heats, with Andrew hitting the top time of 1:56.40 by leading the entirety of the race.

Then, the USA relay of Bella Sims, Paige Madden, Katie McLaughlin, and Brooke Forde won their 800 free relay heat at 7:47.57, seeded second into the final.

Note: Prelim race videos courtesy of NBC Sports are only available to viewers in the United States.

WOMEN’S 100 FREESTYLE – PRELIMS

  1. Emma McKeon (AUS), 52.13 OR
  2. Siobhan Haughey (HKG), 52.70
  3. Anna Hopkin (GBR), 52.75
  4. Cate Campbell (AUS), 52.80
  5. Sarah Sjostrom (SWE), 52.91
  6. Penny Oleksiak (CAN), 52.95
  7. Pernille Blume (DEN), 52.96
  8. Yang Junxuan (CHN), 53.02
  9. Femke Heemskerk (NED), 53.10
  10. Kayla Sanchez (CAN), 53.12
  11. Abbey Weitzeil (USA), 53.21
  12. Michelle Coleman (SWE), 53.53
  13. Signe Bro (DEN), 53.54
  14. Freya Anderson (GBR), 53.61
  15. Charlotte Bonnet (FRA), 53.67
  16. Marie Wattel (FRA) / Ranomi Kromowidjojo (NED), 53.71*

MEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE – PRELIMS

  • World Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA) – 1:51.92 (2009)
  • Olympic Record: Tyler Clary (USA) – 1:53.41 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Kliment Kolesnikov (RUS) – 1:55.14 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Ryan Murphy (USA) – 1:53.62
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 200 Backstroke
  1. Luke Greenbank (GBR), 1:54.63
  2. Evgeny Rylov (ROC), 1:56.02
  3. Bryce Mefford (USA), 1:56.37
  4. Lee Juho (KOR), 1:56.77
  5. Grigory Tarasevich (ROC), 1:56.82
  6. Radoslaw Kawecki (POL), 1:56.83
  7. Ryan Murphy (USA), 1:56.92
  8. Ryosuke Irie (JPN), 1:56.97
  9. Keita Sunama (JPN), 1:57.07
  10. Tristan Hollard (AUS), 1:57.24
  11. Roman Mityukov (SUI), 1:57.45
  12. Brodie Williams (GBR), 1:57.48
  13. Nicolas Garcia Saiz (ESP), 1:57.62
  14. Adam Telegdy (HUN), 1:57.70
  15. Xu Jiayu (CHN), 1:57.76
  16. Markus Thormeyer (CAN), 1:57.85

Video N/A

WOMEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE – PRELIMS

  • World Record: Rikke Moller Pedersen (DEN) – 2:19.11 (2013)
  • Olympic Record: Rebecca Soni (USA) – 2:19.59 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Viktoriya Zeynep Gunes (TUR) – 2:19.64 (2015)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Rie Kaneto (JPN) – 2:20.30
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 200 Breaststroke
  1. Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA), 2:19.16 OR
  2. Lilly King (USA), 2:22.10
  3. Evgeniia Chikunova (ROC), 2:22.16
  4. Kaylene Corbett (RSA), 2:22.48
  5. Annie Lazor (USA), 2:22.76
  6. Molly Renshaw (GBR), 2:22.99
  7. Mariia Temnikova (ROC), 2:23.13
  8. Yu Jingyao (CHN), 2:23.17
  9. Jenna Strauch (AUS), 2:23.30
  10. Jessica Vall Montero (ESP), 2:23.31
  11. Fanny Lecluyse (BEL), 2:23.42
  12. Sophie Hansson (SWE), 2:23.82
  13. Francesca Fangio (ITA), 2:23.89
  14. Lisa Mamie (SUI), 2:23.91
  15. Abbie Wood (GBR), 2:24.13
  16. Kelsey Wog (CAN), 2:24.27

MEN’S 200 INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY – PRELIMS

  • World Record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1:54.00 (2011)
  • Olympic Record: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:54.23 (2008)
  • World Junior Record: Hubert Kos (HUN) – 1:56.99 (2021)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:54.66
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 200 Individual Medley
  1. Michael Andrew (USA), 1:56.40
  2. Jeremy Desplanches (SUI), 1:56.89
  3. Lewis Clareburt (NZL), 1:57.27
  4. Chase Kalisz (USA), 1:57.38
  5. Kosuke Hagino (JPN) / Duncan Scott (GBR), 1:57.39
  6. Wang Shun (CHN), 1:57.42
  7. Alberto Razzetti (ITA), 1:57.46
  8. Mitch Larkin (AUS), 1:57.50
  9. Laszlo Cseh (HUN), 1:57.51
  10. Hugo Gonzalez (ESP), 1:57.61
  11. Tomoe Hvas (NOR), 1:57.64
  12. Philip Heintz (GER), 1:57.72
  13. Andrey Zhilkin (ROC), 1:57.94
  14. Matthew Sates (RSA), 1:58.08
  15. Daiya Seto (JPN), 1:58.15

WOMEN’S 4×200 FREESTYLE RELAY – PRELIMS

  • World Record: Australia (Titmus, Wilson, Throssell, McKeon) – 7:41.50 (2019)
  • Olympic Record: USA (Franklin, Vollmer, Vreeland, Schmitt) – 7:42.92 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Canada (Sanchez, Oleksiak, Smith, Ruck) – 7:51.47 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: USA (Schmitt, Smith, DiRado, Ledecky) – 7:43.03
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 4×200 Freestyle Relay
  1. Australia, 7:44.61
  2. United States, 7:47.57
  3. China, 7:48.98
  4. Canada, 7:51.52
  5. Russian Olympic Committee, 7:52.04
  6. Germany, 7:52.06
  7. France, 7:55.05
  8. Hungary, 7:56.16

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Here Comes Lezak
1 month ago

I can’t tell if MA died or let off the gas a bit. I’m hoping he has a good result and is able to just let loose a little from the expectations. Still a young dude with a bright future!

anonymous
Reply to  Here Comes Lezak
1 month ago

He swam it just like at prelims Trials smooth, 80% effort. Same time at prelim Trials? He definitely backed off in several ways: backed off the fly, saved his legs on back, glided a lot more on breast (saving the legs), backed off last 20 meters free.

Hank
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

Can’t wait to see a 1:54 in the final!

anonymous
Reply to  Here Comes Lezak
1 month ago

1:56.4 at prelims Trials, 1:56.4 here.

Here Comes Lezak
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

Good points all around! I was clearly too lazy to dive into the numbers so I appreciate it lol

Irish Ringer
Reply to  Here Comes Lezak
1 month ago

Shut it down for sure.

Coach Mike 1952
1 month ago

With all due respect, being 0.42 from tying Sarah’s 100 FR WR is getting close, but don’t know that we could quite call it “threatening” yet, though she is showing strong potential for sub-52 for sure. That said, it would be GREAT to see either or both.

Last edited 1 month ago by Coach Mike 1952
jeff
Reply to  Coach Mike 1952
1 month ago

whoever wrote the title and caption for the NBC youtube video definitely messed something up too, they said that she came within a hundredth of the world record

Anonymous
1 month ago

If you are watching the videos from the NBC Olympics website, I hope you are watching it without sound. The International commentators continue to throw out completely inappropriate comments that we haven’t been subjected to through our wonderful commentators in the US.
“…the only real one to watch in this heat…”
“…maybe they’ll be able to get one of the lesser medals…”
We can laugh and joke all we want about Rowdy, but I’m tired of hearing about the “6 beat kick” during every single race by these 2.

anonymous
Reply to  Anonymous
1 month ago

Unprofessional

Swimmer
1 month ago

I thought the sandpipers coach wasn’t named a coach for Tokyo. It looks like he’s there at 3:35 in the lily king video. Is that him or am I tripping

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

I haven’t seen the video, but he did get named to the team.

Anoncoach
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

No, he was at the pre olympics training camp, but is not on the coaching staff for the olympics themselves.

asdfasdf
Reply to  Anoncoach
1 month ago

So… you’re going to argue against video evidence?

anonymous
Reply to  Anoncoach
1 month ago

No he has been at the Olympics he hugged Erica last night on deck.

anonymous
Reply to  Anoncoach
1 month ago

Rowdy even mebtioned it was Coach Aitken

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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