Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Day 6 Finals Live Recap

2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games

It’s Friday morning in Tokyo and we are gearing up for the Day 6 finals session. On tap will be finals for the women’s 200 breast and 100 free and the men’s 200 back and 200 IM. The session will also feature semifinals of men’s 100 fly and women’s 200 back.

In the medal round of the women’s 200 breast, heavily-favored Tatjana Schoenmaker of South Africa will take to lane 4 as the only swimmer in the final who has gone under 2:20 (twice, so far, in these Games). She broke the Olympic Record in heats with 2:19.16, then swam 2:19.33 in the semis. An extra half stroke at the end of that race may have cost her the World Record, so we are on record watch this morning. The rest of the podium is wide open. Schoenmaker’s countrywoman Kaylene Corbett won her heat with 2:22.08 and could give RSA a second medal in this event. Two Americans, Annie Lazor (2:21.94) and Lilly King (2:22.27), are in the hunt. And Evgeniia Chikunova from the Russian Olympic Committee, who qualified second with 2:20.57, is a medal contender, as well.

An American has won the men’s 200 backstroke for the last six Olympic Games in a row (Brad Bridgewater-1996, Lenny Krayzelburg-2000, Aaron Peirsol-2004, Ryan Lochte-2008, Tyler Clary-2012, Ryan Murphy-2016) but Evgeny Rylov of the Russian Olympic Committee, who won the 100 back already, is hoping to end that streak. He qualified first out of the semifinals with 1:54.45. Great Britain’s Luke Greenbank (1:54.98) and USA’s Murphy (1:55.38) will be on either side of him in lanes 5 and 3, respectively.

We’re on World Record watch for the women’s 100 free, in a star-studded final that includes the Olympic Record-holder, Emma McKeon of Australia (52.32) and her teammate Cate Campbell (52.71), who had the fastest time in the world coming into the Olympics; Asian Record-holder Siobhan Haughey of Hong Kong, (52.40); Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom (52.82), the current World Record-holder; and 2016 Olympic gold medalist Penny Oleksiak of Canada (52.86).

The last final of the morning will be the men’s 200 individual medley. 2016 Olympic bronze medalist Wang Shun of China posted the fastest time in semifinals (1:56.22) by nearly half a second. Great Britain’s Duncan Scott (1:56.69) and reigning World Champion Daiya Seto of Japan (1:56.86) qualified second and third. USA’s Michael Andrew came into the Games with the top time in the world. He led the field through heats but qualified fourth for the final with 1:57.08.

Men’s 100 Butterfly – Semifinals

  • World Record: Caeleb Dressel (USA) – 49.50 (2019)
  • Olympic Record: Joseph Schooling (SGP) – 50.39 (2016)/Caeleb Dressel (USA) – 50.39 (2021)
  • World Junior Record: Kristof Milak (HUN) – 50.62 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Joseph Schooling (SGP) – 50.39
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 100 Butterfly
  1. Caeleb Dressel (USA) – 49.71
  2. Kristof Milak (HUN) – 50.31
  3. Noe Ponti (SUI) – 50.76
  4. Josif Miladiniov (BUL) – 51.06
  5. Andrei Minakov (ROC) – 51.11
  6. Matthew Temple (AUS) – 51.12
  7. Jakub Majerski (POL) – 51.24
  8. Luis Carlos Martinez (GUA) – 51.30

Andrei Minakov of the Russian Federation and France’s Mehdy Metella turned together and the 50 wall in semifinal 1, going 23.73. Hungary’s Kristof Milak was just behind with 23.74. The next 50 meters proved decisive, with Milak hammering it home in 26.57 for a new Olympic Record of 50.31. Josif Miladinov of Bulgaria pulled to second place with 51.06, touching out Minakov (51.11) and Australia’s Matthew Temple (51.12).

In the very next heat, USA’s Caeleb Dressel broke Milak’s newly-minted Olympic Record, taking it down to 49.71. Out in 23.20, he came home in 26.51 to notch the third-fastest performance in history. Netherlands’ Nyls Korstanje was second at the 50, just ahead of Switzerland’s Noe Ponti, but Ponti had the second-fastest back half, after Dressel, and placed second with 50.76. Jakub Majerski of Poland touched third in 51.24.

Women’s 200 Breaststroke – Final

  • World Record: Rikke Moller Pedersen (DEN) – 2:19.11 (2013)
  • Olympic Record: Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA) – 2:19.16 (2021)
  • World Junior Record: Viktoriya Zeynep Gunes (TUR) – 2:19.64 (2015)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Rie Kaneto (JPN) – 2:20.30
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 200 Breaststroke
  1. GOLD: Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA), 2:18.95 WR
  2. SILVER: Lilly King (USA), 2:19.92
  3. BRONZE: Annie Lazor (USA), 2:20.84
  4. Evgeniia Chikunova (ROC), 2:20.88
  5. Kaylene Corbett (RSA), 2:22.06
  6. Molly Renshaw (GBR), 2:22.65
  7. Abbie Wood (GBR), 2:23.72
  8. Fanny Lecluyse (BEL), 2:24.57

USA’s Lilly King, who has specialized in the 100 breast through the years, made an early charge on the field from lane 2. She turned first, under World Record pace, in 31.27. South Africa’s Tatjana Schoenmaker, who had broken the Olympic Record in heats, was about .4 behind. Evgeniia Chikunova of the Russian Olympic Committee was in third. King held on to the lead over the second 50, still under WR pace with 1:06.47.

Schoenmaker took over the lead at the 150 wall, outpacing King by .7. USA’s Annie Lazor passed Chikunova and moved into the third position behind King. Schoenmaker came home in 36.47 to post a World and Olympic Record of 2:18.95.

Lazor had the fastest final 50, coming home in 36.11. She held off Chikunova, 2:20.84 to 2:20.88, to earn the bronze medal. King went 2:19.92 for silver.

South Africa did not send one woman to the 2016 Olympic Games. In that year, Schoenmaker’s best time was 2:27 and she did not qualify for Rio.

ALL-TIME PERFORMERS

Rank Swimmer Time Year
1 Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA) 2:18.95 2021
2 Rikke Møller Pedersen (DEN) 2:19.11 2013
3 Yuliya Efimova (RUS) 2:19.41 2013
4 Rebecca Soni (USA) 2:19.59 2012
5 Viktoria Zeynep Güneş (TUR) 2:19.64 2015
6 Rie Kaneto (JPN) 2:19.65 2016
7 Lilly King (USA) 2:19.92 2021
8 Annamay Pierse (CAN) 2:20.12 2009
9 Leisel Jones (AUS) 2:20.54 2006
10 Evgeniia Chikunova (ROC) 2:20.57 2021

Men’s 200 Backstroke – Final

  • World Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA) – 1:51.92 (2009)
  • Olympic Record: Tyler Clary (USA) – 1:53.41 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Kliment Kolesnikov (RUS) – 1:55.14 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Ryan Murphy (USA) – 1:53.62
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 200 Backstroke
  1. GOLD: Evgeny Rylov (ROC), 1:53.27 OR
  2. SILVER: Ryan Murphy (USA), 1:54.15
  3. BRONZE: Luke Greenbank (GBR), 1:54.72
  4. Bryce Mefford (USA), 1:55.49
  5. Adam Telegdy (HUN), 1:56.15
  6. Radoslaw Kawecki (POL), 1:56.39
  7. Ryosuke Irie (JPN), 1:57.32
  8. Nicolas Garcia Saiz (ESP), 1:59.06

Russia Olympic Committee’s Evgeny Rylov, the 100 backstroke gold medalist in these Games, led wire-to-wire in the 200 back final. He took down Tyler Clary’s Olympic Record and became the first non-American to win this event in six Olympics.

Great Britain’s Luke Greenbank was in second place at the 50, just a tick in front of defending Olympic champion Ryan Murphy and Bryce Mefford of USA. Murphy passed Greenback at the halfway mark and trailed Rylov by .45. Rylov increased his lead over the 2016 champion to .7 at the 150. Greenbank maintained his .3 lead over Mefford as they turned into the final 50 meters.

Murphy turned on the jets over the final 50 but Rylov outsplit him, 29.34 to 29.50, and held on for the win with an Olympic Record of 1:53.27.

Murphy scored the silver medal, finishing with 1:54.17. Greenbank won bronze with 1:54.72.

Women’s 100 Freestyle – Final

  1. GOLD: Emma McKeon (AUS), 51.96 OR
  2. SILVER: Siobhan Haughey (HKG), 52.27
  3. BRONZE: Cate Campbell (AUS), 52.52
  4. Penny Oleksiak (CAN), 52.59
  5. Sarah Sjostrom (SWE), 52.68
  6. Femke Heemskerk (NED), 52.79
  7. Anna Hopkin (GBR), 52.83
  8. Abbey Weitzeil (USA), 53.23

Top-seeded Emma McKeon became only the second woman in history to dip under the 52-second barrier with her 51.96 victory in the 100 free final. McKeon was out in 25.08 and home in 26.88 to set both the Olympic Record and the Oceanian Record.

Hong Kong’s Siobhan Haughey flipped in second place at the 50, just .02 behind McKeon. She came home with the third-fastest back half to split 25.10/27.17 for an Asian Record of 52.27.

Australia’s Cate Campbell split 25.19/27.33 to take the bronze in 52.52. It is her first medal since the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

Defending champion Penny Oleksiak of Canada finished just off the podium with 52.59. World Record-holder Sarah Sjostrom of Sweden came from 8th place at the 50 to 5th at the finish, touching in 52.68.

ALL-TIME PERFORMERS

Rank Swimmer Time Year
1 Sarah Sjöström (SWE) 51.71 2017
2 Emma McKeon (AUS) 51.96 2021
3 Cate Campbell (AUS) 52.03 2018
4 Simone Manuel (USA) 52.04 2019
5 Britta Steffen (GER) 52.07 2009
6T Bronte Campbell (AUS) 52.27 2018
6T Siobhan Haughey (HKG) 52.27 2021
8T Mallory Comerford (USA) 52.59 2017
8T Penny Oleksiak 52.59 2021
10 Libby Trickett (AUS) 52.62 2009

Men’s 200 Individual Medley – Final

  • World Record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1:54.00 (2011)
  • Olympic Record: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:54.23 (2008)
  • World Junior Record: Hubert Kos (HUN) – 1:56.99 (2021)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:54.66
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 200 Individual Medley
  1. GOLD: Wang Shun (CHN), 1:55.00
  2. SILVER: Duncan Scott (GBR), 1:55.28
  3. BRONZE: Jeremy Desplanches (SUI), 1:56.17
  4. Daiya Seto (JPN), 1:56.22
  5. Michael Andrew (USA), 1:57.31
  6. Kosuke Hagino (JPN), 1:57.40
  7. Laszlo Cseh (HUN), 1:57.68
  8. Lewis Clareburt (NZL), 1:57.70

2016 bronze medalist Wang Shun broke the Asian Record and won Olympic gold in the men’s 200 IM. He posted a 1:55.00, racing stroke for stroke with Great Britain’s Duncan Scott over the final 50 meters. Both Wang and Scott came from behind to wind up on the first two steps of the podium.

USA’s Michael Andrew led the field through the first 150 meters, as was expected. Andrew was a full second up after the breaststroke, turning for home with a running time of 1:26.62. Butterflyer Laszlo Cseh of Hungary had been second behind Andrew at the 50 wall with Wang in third place. Wang overtook Cseh on the backstroke. On the breaststroke leg, Andrew pulled further ahead of Wang, while Japan’s Daiya Seto and Switzerland’s Jeremy Desplanches moved into third and fourth place.

Wang, Scott, Desplanches, and Seto blew past Andrew, who split 30.69 on the freestyle. Wang and Scott went 27-mids to score the gold and silver medals with 1:55.00 and 1:55.28. Desplanches was .13 faster coming home than Seto, and claimed the bronze by .05 with a new Swiss Record of 1:56.17.

Andrew finished fifth with 1:57.31.

ALL-TIME PERFORMERS

Rank Swimmer Time Year
1 Ryan Lochte (USA) 1:54.00 2011
2 Michael Phelps (USA) 1:54.16 2011
3 Wang Shun (CHN) 1:55.00 2021
4 Kosuke Hagino (JPN) 1:55.07 2016
5 László Cseh (HUN) 1:55.18 2009
6 Michael Andrew (USA) 1:55.26 2021
7 Duncan Scott (GBR) 1:55.28 2021
8 Eric Shanteau (USA) 1:55.36 2009
9 Chase Kalisz (USA) 1:55.40 2018
10T Thiago Pereira (BRA) 1:55.55 2009
10T Daiya Seto (JPN) 1:55.55 2020

Women’s 200 Backstroke – Semifinals

  • World Record: Regan Smith (USA) – 2:03.35 (2019)
  • Olympic Record: Missy Franklin (USA) – 2:04.06 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Regan Smith (USA) – 2:03.35 (2019)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Maya DiRado (USA) – 2:05.99
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 200 Backstroke
  1. Emily Seebohm (AUS) – 2:07.09
  2. Phoebe Bacon (USA) – 2:07.10
  3. Rhyan White (USA) – 2:07.28
  4. Kylie Masse (CAN) – 2:07.92
  5. Kaylee McKeown (AUS) – 2:07.93
  6. Liu Yaxin (CHN) – 2:08.65
  7. Taylor Ruck (CAN) – 2:08.73
  8. Peng Xuwei (CHN) – 2:08.76

Swimming in lanes 4 and 5, Americans Rhyan White and Phoebe Bacon got out first in semifinal 1, flipping nearly together at the 50 wall with 29.7s. Canada’s Taylor Ruck was .2 behind them. Bacon took over the lead at the 100, turning at 1:01.52, about half a body length ahead of White. Australia’s Emily Seebohm moved into third, passing Ruck and Italy’s Margherita Panziera.

Over the next 50 meters, Bacon held the lead, while Seebohm passed White. Seebohm touched out Bacon at the finish by .01, 2:07.09 to 2:07.10. White was just .18 back with 2:07.28.

Swimming in lanes 4 and 5, Americans Rhyan White and Phoebe Bacon got out first in semifinal 1, flipping nearly together at the 50 wall with 29.7s. Canada’s Taylor Ruck was .2 behind them. Bacon took over the lead at the 100, turning at 1:01.52, about half a body length ahead of White. Australia’s Emily Seebohm moved into third, passing Ruck and Italy’s Margherita Panziera.

Over the next 50 meters, Bacon held the lead, while Seebohm passed White. Seebohm touched out Bacon at the finish by .01, 2:07.09 to 2:07.10. White was just .18 back with 2:07.28.

Canada’s Kylie Masse started semifinal 2 with a bang. She led Peng Xuwei of China and Australia’s Kaylee McKeown by .2 at the 50. Hungary’s Katalin Burian took control over the next 50 and flipped first at the 100 wall in 1:02.54. McKeown and Masse turned essentially together in second place. McKeown pulled to the front of the pack on the third 50, followed by Liu Yaxin of China and Masse.

Masse had a massive final 50, coming home in 32.21, and secured the heat win in 2:07.82. McKeown was second with 2:07.93. Liu touched out countrywoman Peng, 2:08.65 to 2:08.76, to come in third.

In Saturday’s 200 back final, there will be two swimmers from Australia, Canada, China, and the United States.

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RUN-DMC
1 month ago

I’m surprised that no one has commented on yesterday morning’s (Japan time) last-minute reshuffling of the schedule for finals. The commentators on the Eurosport GB feed had no idea what was going to happen next because they had not been given a copy of the suddenly revised schedule. All the medal ceremonies were moved to after the women’s 200 fly final.

This probably gave Zhang Yufei an extra 15 minutes of rest, if not more, between her fantastic 2:03 200 fly and her 1:55 200 free split in the relay.

In that time gap, she had to take a drug test, warm down, rehydrate, refuel, and attend her medal ceremony. The relay started immediately after her medal ceremony.

How… Read more »

Hswimmer
Reply to  RUN-DMC
1 month ago

Good points, but she seemed fine with it. I wouldn’t be complaining, she clearly trains for that type of turn around.

Steve Nolan
Reply to  RUN-DMC
1 month ago

Did they move stuff around tonight, too? I coulda swore the women’s 100 free was supposed to be earlier tonight.

(Because I needed to know because oh god my bets I’m going to die.)

Kevin
Reply to  RUN-DMC
1 month ago

The stream I was watching said there was a technical issue with the system used to raise the flags for the medal ceremony. That threw things off so instead of continuing to delay the next swim they pushed the ceremony’s and continued to work on the mechanical problems.

Wahooswimfan
Reply to  RUN-DMC
1 month ago

Surely NBC dictated the change so they could show gymnastics and another Simone Biles commercial

Screaming
1 month ago

Just gonna leave this here 💅🏼🇺🇸

comment image

Hswimmer
Reply to  Screaming
1 month ago

WAR EAGLE

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Screaming
1 month ago

The homepage of my version of the NBC Sports App right now is her, Lily King and Michael Andrew.

Hillbilly
Reply to  Steve Nolan
1 month ago

They should take off that anti-vaxx doosh. No medals for him. Love to see it.

Anonymous
Reply to  Hillbilly
1 month ago

He gave up his whole life for 4th and 5th for science they believed and stuffed down our throats and real science they didn’t believe because it requires a decade of school and training. I feel sorry for them.

Coach
Reply to  Anonymous
1 month ago

He swam 1.8 slower than Trials. I’m sorry but he is fast no matter what u all day. Always putting him down. I don’t see you going after other swimmers who swam off!

SwimFam
Reply to  Coach
1 month ago

Did you know see the terrible things people were saying about Erika Brown for going .5 slower on the relay???

And she’s a great human being and teammate unlike some anti-vaxers on the team.

SwimFan
Reply to  Anonymous
1 month ago

Coincidence that he’s the only swimmer on the team (over 18) that didn’t go to college???

Stay in school kids…

Anonymous2
Reply to  Anonymous
1 month ago

Sorry Coach, but the whole family is weird. We encountered AM at national meets. There was a pretty strong rumor years ago that his parents didn’t want him to go to college because he would be “corrupted” there. What kid turns pro at such a young age? There is something wrong with that. The family was betting that he would clean up at the Olympics so they could make money off their MA Academy. Yes, he is fast, but at some point, it fails him,. Plus, he’s an anti-vaxxer. Where has that gotten him?

Swamfan
Reply to  Anonymous2
1 month ago

Several years ago in an interview his mother was asked if she was disappointed he wouldn’t be swimming in college. Her response: “why would I want my son to go to college and he brainwashed by liberal professors”

Last edited 1 month ago by Swamfan
Anonymoose
Reply to  Screaming
1 month ago

so effing pretty

Jane Dressel's Vertical Leap
Reply to  Anonymoose
1 month ago

How about commenting on her accomplishments rather than her looks?

Joe
Reply to  Screaming
1 month ago

I’m sure all the racists that fume whenever an Asian swimmer wins a swimming event are fuming deep down lmfao

Coachy
Reply to  Joe
1 month ago

What are you talking about? You’re the only one thinking like this. You’re the racist.

David s
Reply to  Screaming
1 month ago

Japanese athlete ?

Joe joe
1 month ago

Michael Andrew will prove the haters wrong.

Hswimmer
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

He looks very vulnerable has to be 29 or he will get caught at the end and miss a medal completely.

Facts
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

This site gonna be a saltmine if he manages to win gold

Smith-Jacoby-Huske-Weitzeil
Reply to  Facts
1 month ago

The comments section will implode.

T S
Reply to  Facts
1 month ago

This is the main reason I want him to win, texas tap water might have a stroke

casual observer
Reply to  Facts
1 month ago

this aged well

Wave 1.5 Qualifier
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

I picked him to finish first in the Men’s 150m and 175m IM.
Melanie Margalis recently told us how difficult it is to succeed at both IM distances in the same meet. MA will do it.

Yup
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

MA didn’t swim both IM distances in the same meet, so…….

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Yup
1 month ago

Sometimes you get the joke, and sometimes the joke gets you

He said what?
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

That was genuinely funny. Thank you!

Smith-Jacoby-Huske-Weitzeil
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

A priceless Steinway may fall upon Michael Andrew prior to the 175 meter mark.

Anonymous
Reply to  Smith-Jacoby-Huske-Weitzeil
1 month ago

You win

LaBlom
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

lol

Coach Coach
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

@ Joe joe. That’s some wicked sarcasm.
He looked like he was going to need the lifeguard.
Pathetic.
Time for a new coach and training regimen.

Sun Yangs Mom
Reply to  Coach Coach
1 month ago

Couldn’t agree more MA needs to train with greg troy not his dad.
#MichaelAndrewKissesHisDadontheLips

Coachcoach
Reply to  Coach Coach
1 month ago

How stupid. At OT he went 1:55.2. 3 rd fastest ever after Lochte. And Phelps. And u attack his training!

MikeYoung
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

Well you were wrong

Anonymous
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

Uh oh. Whoops.

Pvdh
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

This is the most correct any haters in anything ever have been proved right.

Tyson
Reply to  Joe joe
1 month ago

How did that turn out he chocked big time

Oceanian
1 month ago

The toughest days in the Olympics are here.

When swimming and athletics overlap.

CMOK
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

These are the best days! High jump and steeplechase on one screen, swimming finals on the other. I love it!!

Oceanian
Reply to  CMOK
1 month ago

Yes I have two laptops streaming and the TV on too

Yup
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

when MA tries to finish a 200…..

That70s_swimmer
Reply to  Yup
1 month ago

Yup – brilliant!

Wow
1 month ago

Boring night for AUS and USA. AUS with one favorite for gold, US none.

Wow
1 month ago

Predictions
W200BR Schoenmaker WR
M200BK Rylov OR
W100FR McKeon OR
M200IM Scott

PACFAN
Reply to  Wow
1 month ago

Here right after Rylov OR, congrats. I’d bet you’re on the money all the way through after watching McKeon 100fr swim (wow) and Andrew in the IM (ow)

Anonymoose
Reply to  Wow
1 month ago

look at you go!

john1bremer
1 month ago

Know it is likely not going to happen but it would be wonderful if somehow Laszlo snuck in for a last medal. He is an amazing athlete.

BadShoulder
Reply to  john1bremer
1 month ago

I know it isn’t going to happen, but I really want him to win gold. He’s been around for so long and been so close so many times.

Francis
1 month ago

i’m an MA fan. idc what ya’ll say.

Curious swimmer
Reply to  Francis
1 month ago

I say you about to be happy that he finishes the race with how badly he’ll be tightening up as he breathes to his right

Tomek
Reply to  Curious swimmer
1 month ago

Not that long ago most of the posters here did not believe Andrew will make olympic team. Please let us know which american swimmer, other than Andrew, would have a better chance in 200 IM today?

Yabo
Reply to  Tomek
1 month ago

Probably none, doesn’t change the fact that his last leg of that race is absolutely brutal to watch

MikeYoung
Reply to  Tomek
1 month ago

Doesn’t matter now. He lost. I have always said how do they know USRPT is the best way if they never tried traditional method?

Jake From State Farm
Reply to  Tomek
1 month ago

Which American swimmer? That’s easy. Michael Phelps, even after retiring in 2016.

That70s_swimmer
Reply to  Tomek
1 month ago

From the commentary it sounded to me that Phelps thinks he could do better…..but he is retired…right?

Yup
Reply to  Francis
1 month ago

group therapy is available…

Coachcoach
Reply to  Francis
1 month ago

In the last few years MA has taken his breastroke from 1:00 to 58.1. His IM almost 5 seconds. I don’t see the haters going after other swimmers like Smith who holds the WR in the 2 back! And didn’t even make the team. I think wecalso had another entry in the 2im that was not in the final but no criticism about him!

Coachy
Reply to  Francis
1 month ago

MA should just say he had “mental health issues” the last 50, then he would be a hero.

FluidG
Reply to  Coachy
1 month ago

I hope you’re not a coach. Toxic.

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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