Olympic Results Digest: All The Medalists & Records Set In The Pool In Tokyo

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

The pool swimming competition was the first of the five aquatic disciplines to wrap up at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, and we’ve compiled a quick reference guide for you to get all of the information you need from the meet in once place.

Below you can find all of the medalists in each event during the swimming competition, with results to the full results summary linked to each event name.

Men’s Events

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s 50m Freestyle Caeleb Dressel (USA), 21.07 OR Florent Manaudou (FRA), 21.55 Bruno Fratus (BRA), 21.57
Men’s 100m Freestyle Caeleb Dressel (USA), 47.02 OR Kyle Chalmers (AUS), 47.08 Kliment Kolesnikov (ROC), 47.44
Men’s 200m Freestyle Tom Dean (GBR), 1:44.22 Duncan Scott (GBR), 1:44.26 Fernando Scheffer (BRA), 1:44.66 SA
Men’s 400m Freestyle Ahmed Hafnaoui (TUN), 3:43.36 Jack McLoughlin (AUS), 3:43.52 Kieran Smith (USA), 3:43.94
Men’s 800m Freestyle Bobby Finke (USA), 7:41.87 Gregorio Paltrinieri (ITA), 7:42.11 Mykhailo Romanchuk (UKR), 7:42.33
Men’s 1500m Freestyle Bobby Finke (USA), 14:39.65 Mykhailo Romanchuk (UKR), 14:40.66 Florian Wellbrock (GER), 14:40.91
Men’s 100m Backstroke Evgeny Rylov (ROC), 51.98 ER Kliment Kolesnikov (ROC), 52.00 Ryan Murphy (USA), 52.19
Men’s 200m Backstroke Evgeny Rylov (ROC), 1:53.27 OR Ryan Murphy (USA), 1:54.15 Luke Greenbank (GBR), 1:54.72
Men’s 100m Breaststroke Adam Peaty (GBR), 57.37 Arno Kamminga (NED), 58.00 Nicolo Martinenghi (ITA), 58.33
Men’s 200m Breaststroke Zac Stubblety-Cook (AUS), 2:06.38 OR Arno Kamminga (NED), 2:07.01 Matti Mattsson (FIN), 2:07.13
Men’s 100m Butterfly Caeleb Dressel (USA), 49.45 WR Kristof Milak (HUN), 49.68 ER Noe Ponti (SUI), 50.74
Men’s 200m Butterfly Kristof Milak (HUN), 1:51.25 OR Tomoru Honda (JPN), 1:53.73 Federico Burdisso (ITA), 1:54.45
Men’s 200m Individual Medley Wang Shun (CHN), 1:55.00 AS Duncan Scott (GBR), 1:55.28 Jeremy Desplanches (SUI), 1:56.17
Men’s 400m Individual Medley Chase Kalisz (USA), 4:09.42 Jay Litherland (USA), 4:10.28 Brendon Smith (AUS), 4:10.38
Men’s 4x100m Freestyle Relay United States (Caeleb Dressel, Blake Pieroni, Bowe Becker, Zach Apple), 3:08.97 Italy (Alessandro Miressi, Thomas Ceccon, Lorenzo Zazzeri, Manuel Frigo), 3:10.11
Men’s 4x200m Freestyle Relay Great Britain (Tom Dean, James Guy, Matthew Richards, Duncan Scott), 6:58.58 ER ROC (Martin Malyutin, Ivan Girev, Evgeny Rylov, Mikhail Dovgalyuk), 7:01.81
Men’s 4x100m Medley Relay United States (Ryan Murphy, Michael Andrew, Caeleb Dressel, Zach Apple), 3:26.78 WR Great Britain (Luke Greenbank, Adam Peaty, James Guy, Duncan Scott), 3:27.51 ER

Women’s Events

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Women’s 50m Freestyle Emma McKeon (AUS), 23.81 OR Sarah Sjostrom (SWE), 24.07 Pernille Blume (DEN), 24.21
Women’s 100m Freestyle Emma McKeon (AUS), 51.96 OR Siobhan Haughey (HKG), 52.27 AS Cate Campbell (AUS), 52.52
Women’s 200m Freestyle Ariarne Titmus (AUS), 1:53.50 OC Siobhan Haughey (HKG), 1:53.92 AS Penny Oleksiak (CAN), 1:54.70
Women’s 400m Freestyle Ariarne Titmus (AUS), 3:56.69 OC Katie Ledecky (USA), 3:57.36 Li Bingjie (CHN), 4:01.08 AS
Women’s 800m Freestyle Katie Ledecky (USA), 8:12.57 Ariarne Titmus (AUS), 8:13.83 OC Simona Quadarella (ITA), 8:18.35
Women’s 1500m Freestyle Katie Ledecky (USA), 15:37.34 Erica Sullivan (USA), 15:41.41 Sarah Kohler (GER), 15:42.91
Women’s 100m Backstroke Kaylee McKeown (AUS), 57.47 OR Kylie Masse (CAN), 57.72 Regan Smith (USA), 58.05
Women’s 200m Backstroke Kaylee McKeown (AUS), 2:04.68 Kylie Masse (CAN), 2:05.42 Emily Seebohm (AUS), 2:06.17
Women’s 100m Breaststroke Lydia Jacoby (USA), 1:04.95 Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA), 1:05.22 Lilly King (USA), 1:05.54
Women’s 200m Breaststroke Tatjana Schoenmaker (RSA), 2:18.95 WR Lilly King (USA), 2:19.92 Annie Lazor (USA), 2:20.84
Women’s 100m Butterfly Maggie MacNeil (CAN), 55.59 AM Zhang Yufei (CHN), 55.64 Emma McKeon (AUS), 55.72 OC
Women’s 200m Butterfly Zhang Yufei (CHN), 2:03.86 OR Regan Smith (USA), 2:05.30 Hali Flickinger (USA), 2:05.65
Women’s 200m Individual Medley Yui Ohashi (JPN), 2:08.52 Alex Walsh (USA), 2:08.65 Kate Douglass (USA), 2:09.04
Women’s 400m Individual Medley Yui Ohashi (JPN), 4:32.08 Emma Weyant (USA), 4:32.76 Hali Flickinger (USA), 4:34.90
Women’s 4x100m Freestyle Relay Australia (Bronte Campbell, Meg Harris, Emma McKeon, Cate Campbell), 3:29.69 WR Canada (Kayla Sanchez, Maggie MacNeil, Rebecca Smith, Penny Oleksiak), 3:32.78
Women’s 4x200m Freestyle Relay China (Yang Junxuan, Tang Muhan, Zhang Yufei, Li Bingjie), 7:40.33 WR United States (Allison Schmitt, Paige Madden, Katie McLaughlin, Katie Ledecky), 7:40.73 AM
Women’s 4x100m Medley Relay Australia (Kaylee McKeown, Chelsea Hodges, Emma McKeon, Cate Campbell), 3:51.60 OR United States (Regan Smith, Lydia Jacoby, Torri Huske, Abbey Weitzeil), 3:51.73

MIXED EVENT

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Mixed 4x100m Medley Relay Great Britain (Kathleen Dawson, Adam Peaty, James Guy, Anna Hopkin), 3:37.58 WR China (Xu Jiayu, Yan Zibei, Zhang Yufei, Yang Junxuan), 3:38.86
  • WR = World Record
  • OR = Olympic Record
  • AM = Americas Record
  • ER = European Record
  • AS = Asian Record
  • OC = Oceanian Records

RECORDS BROKEN BY TYPE

Below is a list of all of the world, Olympic and Continental Records broken during the Games.

Note: Crossed out performances indicate that the record was re-broken later in the competition.

WORLD RECORDS

OLYMPIC RECORDS

CONTINENTAL RECORDS

Americas Records (North and South America)

Note: “North American Records” aren’t officially kept, though South American Records are. Two SA marks fell in Tokyo at the hands of Fernando Scheffer in the men’s 200m freestyle (1:44.66) and Guilherme Costa in the men’s 800m freestyle (7:46.09).

European Records

Asian Records

Oceanian Records

African Records

In This Story

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MrClean
1 month ago

When will know how much money they earned?

Sub13
Reply to  MrClean
1 month ago

I think Haughey is the only one that will get any significant prize money from the medals.

Ytho
1 month ago

Now that is am article I could browse for a long time

BKP
1 month ago

Typo in the first section for Titmus’ 400 record (should be OC)

BKP
1 month ago

Probably one of the best Olympics on the relay side. Individually, I expected at least one or two WRs from the Aussie women stars. Also never thought that Milak wouldn’t clip his 200 WR, then would go 49.6 in the 100, incredible! We were definitely denied a 49.1 with Caeleb’s long turn and finish

Sub13
Reply to  BKP
1 month ago

I think trials showed they’re definitely capable of it but it just didn’t happen. Kaylee was 0.02 off her own world record, would have broken the WR if she didn’t already at trials. Emma now has the second fastest 100 free of all time, and the fastest in the individual event (Sjostrom’s world record was a relay lead off). Emma also has the sixth fastest free split of all time, making her the second fastest ever (the top 5 are all Cate Campbell). Arnie posted the third fastest 200 of all time only behind herself and Pellegrini’s super suit, and the second fastest 400 of all time.

They all came mouth wateringly close.

Samuel Huntington
Reply to  BKP
1 month ago

It seems like Dressel often has a long turn at the big meets.

torchbearer
Reply to  BKP
1 month ago

The Aussie women didn’t have semis at the Trials…so they were swimming a lot more metres at the OLympics…maybe a factor.

Eric the eel > Phelps
1 month ago

Just a reminder that Thorpe would have won the gold in tokyo 2021 by 3 sec with his time 21 years ago (sydney 2000)

Stoobie
Reply to  Eric the eel > Phelps
1 month ago

…in a full body suit…just a reminder…

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

…3:41.83 as a 16 yo in a brief…just a reminder…

https://youtu.be/Jnz08P6sQEQ

Last edited 1 month ago by Old Man Chalmers
Gogo bibi
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

Other guys wore the same suit as him but didn’t perform at his level at that time

Last edited 1 month ago by Gogo bibi
Togger
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

He’s have won by 2 in a pair of briefs with his 1999 Pan Pacs time.

Gogo bibi
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

Yeah there is a difference between thorpe suit and arena/speedo space suit where every random elite swimmer cracked a WR

Last edited 1 month ago by Gogo bibi
The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

It wasn’t a suit as we know them from 08/09. It is arguable that it was better than trunks at the time. It didn’t take off with other swimmers.

I thibk it is clear that the current suits are the best ever for women except 100% poly from 2009 (yes I think they have reached the level of the half poly 2008 suits with other advancements).

With men it is harder as they are restricted to jammers. I think male suits are significantly behind 2009 but have closed on 2008 and are better than anything available at any other time.

David S
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

He says he was allergic to pool water

Jack
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

Yeah but the first gen of body suits, which were not as good as modern jammers are for cutting time.

BigNowhere
Reply to  Stoobie
1 month ago

Somebody always brings up Thorpe’s body suit and they are always wrong. That suit didn’t help him.

At 14, he swam the LCM 400 free in 3:49 in a Speedo brief.

At 15, he swam the LCM 400 free in 3:46 in a brief.

At 16, he swam the LCM 400 free in 3:41 in a brief.

At this point he was the world record holder, in a time that wouldn’t be beaten by anyone else for nearly 10 years.

After he achieved that status he started wearing the full body suit at 17. He got a little faster after that but he was already a once-in-a-generation swimmer by that point.

Most male swimmers get significantly stronger and… Read more »

frug
Reply to  Eric the eel > Phelps
1 month ago

Thorpe and Hackett would have swept the 200-400-800-1500 with times they put up at 2001 WC. Meanwhile Ervin’s winning times in the 50 and 100 that year would have come in 15th and 19th.

The Weez
Reply to  frug
1 month ago

Add the 1000 back into NCAA Championship competitions…and I think we’d see some increased improvement on the US distance (depth) front.

Having been on most relays in HS / Club and then going to college and being on none…you realize that most distance swimmers are at a HUGE disadvantage in terms of progressing. Those that can, will be encouraged to work on their sprinting (see Conger, Townley, etc. etc….all of the droppped the 400 from their LC schedules as they progressed in college).

It’s completely justifiable, but with SO much emphasis on sprinting in college, you lose top talent continuing to progress / train for true mid-distance and distance events.

Old Man Chalmers
1 month ago

some small corrections:
m100 back should say ER not OR
w50 and 200 free should say OR not OC
w4x100 medley should also say OC

Joel
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
1 month ago

Thanks. I was confused. Hope they fix it.

Coach Mike 1952
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
1 month ago

Correct, AND w50 & 200 FR were also OC too, but leaving OR out ought to be corrected

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Coach Mike 1952
1 month ago

50 free OC is 23.78 from C1
200 free OC is 1:53.09 from titmus

Yozhik
1 month ago

Since there were so many successful relays it is possible that there were some fastest ever splits. They are undeservedly not recognized as records. Too bad. The super fast split is not less exciting than individual world record and says a lot about summer’s abilities to concentrate when racing for the team success. For example, based on comments from Australian fans the breaststroke split in women Madelyn relay was more exciting than McKeon’s Olympic records.
Does anybody know where such information can be found.
And also, the Olympics.com result page had some problems reporting reaction time for 4th leg for all teams during first days of competition.
Does anybody know Ledecky’s reaction time in 4×200 relay? Thank you.

Last edited 1 month ago by Yozhik
Yozhik
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

If medals earned in relay competition are so widely used in determining the “legend” or the “greatness” status then splits and contribution to team success have to be analyzed with more scrutiny.
If Erica Brown swims 0.5sec slower in 4x100FR relay than she does in individual race or Manuel’s splits in Rio relay is 0.6 sec slower than a few days later in individual race or Schmitt swims 2sec slower in 800 relay other year than expected then I would call them rather spoilers then contributors.
If the performance in the relay adjusted by reaction time is well away results in individual race in same meet I would not give a swimmer a medal credit for such performance.… Read more »

Sub13
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

I don’t think anyone is saying that Chelsea’s relay split was more impressive than Emma’s 7 World/Olympic records, but it was certainly more unexpected. Emma also had the fastest split in the 100 free relay and the fastest female freestyle split in the mixed medley relay.

You can find the 25 fastest relay split of all time here: https://www.usaswimming.org/times/data-hub/all-time-relay-splits

From what I can see it only goes up to 25 for each stroke/distance, but appears to be accurate. Not sure if there is a better place to get it.

Sub13
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

From looking there, Peaty and Dressel posted the fastest breast/fly splits of all time in the mens relay, and Maggie MacNeil posted the second fastest fly split of all time. No one else was in the top 3 except Peaty, who also claimed number 3 in the MMR (it was #2 when it happened but got pushed back in the mens relay).

Yozhik
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Thank for the help. I am aware of this data source but this database is definitely incomplete.
For example, to my knowledge the fastest split in the history (textile) in W4x200 relay belongs to Sarah Sjostrom. And that is 1:53.64. She achieved this result at European Championships in 2014.
http://www.microplustiming.com/berlin2014/index_webBerlin2014.php

And to support my point in previous post the list of names of best performances in the W4x200 relays, for example, looks quite different than the list of names of best performances in individual W200FR event.
Isn’t it strange?

Last edited 1 month ago by Yozhik
Togger
1 month ago

Thinking of what you’d make of the times if you were shown this at the end of Athens (mind untainted by super suits).

1) Women’s middle and distance free got crazy fast. Sprint free a bit less.

2) Women’s backstroke got really quick.

3) Women’s breast and fly got quicker, but nothing too nuts.

4) Women’s IM nothing major happened, some progression but not significant.

5) Men’s freestyle sprinting is quick. Men’s mid-distance and distance isn’t.

6) Men’s backstroke, fly and IM is quicker but nothing crazy other than the 200 fly gold.

7) Men’s breastroke is loco fast.

frug
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

Thorpe and Hackett’s reaction to the men’s mid an long distance freestyle times

A. Cool they finally added the 800 free
B. 17 years and that’s the best they can do? We were putting up better times than those 3 years ago
C. Wait 17 years? Why are they holding the 2020 Olympics in 2021? Seriously, what the hell happened?

Last edited 1 month ago by frug
mcmflyguy
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

mens 100 fly would be 1.2 seconds faster… from 04. almost 1 full second faster from 05.

when your talking about the limits of human capabilities, 1 full second in 16 years is quite fast in a 100. mind you it took 4 full years after 05 and a body suit to break the old record of 50.4 for phelps. and phelps went 49.8. thats with technological help. (he did break it before in the same year by .2, but I am unsure if it was with LZR or not)

100 fly… nothing crazy. ok. Caleb Dressel just kicked the door down and did a 49.4.

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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