2021 U.S. Olympic Trials Wave II: Day 5 Prelims Live Recap

2021 U.S. OLYMPIC SWIMMING TRIALS

We’ve had to wait four full days for reigning world champ Simone Manuel to make her debut at U.S. Olympic Trials. But the wait is over, as Manual leads the 100 free heats this morning.

Manuel is the defending Olympic and World champion in the 100 free. She’ll head up a tough 100 free field this morning. In each of our circle seeded heats, we should see established sprint veterans take on rising newcomers. In the first circle-seeded heat, it’ll be 2016 Olympian Abbey Weitzeil vs newly-minted 16-year-old Olympian Claire Curzanfresh off a runner-up finish in the 100 fly. Next up is former American record-holder Mallory Comerford taking on 100 fly champ Torri Huske18. In the final heat, Manuel and former NCAA star Erika Brown will match up with 2019 World Junior champion Gretchen Walsh18.

We’ll get to see Ryan Murphy lead the 200 back heats after winning the 100 back a few nights ago and booking his return to the Olympic stage. Behind Murphy, Texas A&M standout Shaine Casas looks to bounce back after a third-place finish in the 100 back on Tuesday night.

The 200 breast should be a smash. Lilly King defended her Olympic Trials title in the 100 breast Tuesday night – the first woman to do so since the 1980s. But she’s got a tough field to face in the longer distance, especially after both Annie Lazor and Bethany Galat swam very well in the 100 – both Lazor and Galat are more endurance-based breastrokers who should thrive in the 200, while King is more of a sprinter who is working to add the 200 to her world-level range.

The session will end with the 200 IM, pitting Trials 400 IM winner Chase Kalisz against Trials 100 breast winner Michael Andrew in a true clash of two of USA Swimming’s most versatile talents – one (Kalisz) geared towards endurance and the other (Andrew) a true speedster.

That event will also feature 6-time Olympic gold medalist Ryan Lochte trying to make his fifth consecutive U.S. Olympic team at the age of 36. Olympic 4×200 free relay qualifier Andrew Seliskar should also be in the mix.

Keep refreshing this page for live, event-by-event recaps of all the action from Omaha.

Women’s 100 free

  • World Record: Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) – 51.71 (2017)
  • American Record: Simone Manuel – 52.04 (2019)
  • US Open Record: Simone Manuel (USA) – 52.54 (2018)
  • World Junior Record: Penny Oleksiak (CAN) – 52.70 (2016)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Simone Manuel (USA) / Penny Oleksiak (CAN) – 52.70
  • 2016 US Olympic Trials Champion: Abbey Weitzeil – 53.28
  • Wave I Cut: 56.29
  • Wave II Cut: 55.56

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Abbey Weitzeil (CAL) – 53.52
  2. Olivia Smoliga (ABSC) – 54.00
  3. Catie DeLoof (CA-Y) – 54.21
  4. Natalie Hinds (ABSC) – 54.34
  5. Linnea Mack (TE) – 54.37
  6. Simone Manuel (ALTO) – 54.47
  7. Erika Brown (TNAQ) – 54.61
  8. Kate Douglass (UVA) – 54.62
  9. Beata Nelson (WA) – 54.71
  10. Katie McLaughlin (CAL) – 54.72
  11. Allison Schmitt (SUN) – 54.78
  12. Torri Huske (AAC) – 54.80
  13. Claire Curzan (TAC) – 54.84
  14. Mallory Comerford (CARD) – 54.85
  15. Kelsi Dahlia (CARD) – 54.96
  16. Gabby DeLoof (CW) – 55.22

In the battle of vets vs teens, the veterans won a resounding 3-0 victory this morning. 2016 Olympian Abbey Weitzeil won the opening circle-seeded heat by seven-tenths of a second, and her time held up as the top swim through the final two heats. Weitzeil is the only swimmer sub-54 in the morning. In 2016, four women broke 54 in heats and five did it in semis.

Weitzeil, though, was actually remarkably similar to her heats swim five years ago. Weitzeil was 53.58 in heats in 2016, also qualifying first. She would win all three rounds, going 53.5 again in semis and then 53.2 in the final.

The second circle-seeded heat featured Olivia Smoliga charging to the front with two incredible breakouts off her start and turn. Smoliga finished a heartbreaking third in the 100 back final a few nights ago, but looked great this morning as she fights for a return Olympic trip. She hit a career-best 54.00 to qualify second.

It was a great morning for veterans all-around. 27-year-old Natalie Hinds won the final heat in 54.34, beating defending Olympic champ Simone Manuel (54.47).

It’ll be a very competitive set of semifinals tonight, with just three-tenths of a second separating 7th-place Erika Brown and 15th-place Kelsi Dahlia. (Dahlia, like Smoliga, was just left out of the Olympic spots in her primary stroke, but came through with a good swim this morning to keep her Olympic repeat hopes alive).

Further back, 16-year-old Santa Maria Swim Club swimmer Claire Tuggle dropped two-tenths to go 55.89 – that moves her up to #44 all-time in the 15-16 age group.

As with the 200 free, we had a lot of notable names scratch the event late. Likely Olympic 400 and 4×200 free relay qualifier Paige Madden was a no-show. She still has an entry into the 800 tomorrow. 2019 World Champs butterfly bronze medalist Katie Drabot scratched, in what was her last entry of these Trials. 200 IM winner Alex Walsh was a no-show in her heat.

Notable swimmers left out of the semifinals include 2019 World Junior champ Gretchen Walsh (who was 28th in 55.91) and Wave I breakout star Camille Spink, who had a solid 55.57 but wound up 22nd.

Men’s 200 back

  • World Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA) – 1:51.92 (2009)
  • American Record: Aaron Peirsol – 1:51.92 (2009)
  • US Open Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA) – 1:53.08 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Kliment Kolesnikov (RUS) – 1:55.14 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Ryan Murphy (USA) – 1:53.62
  • 2016 US Olympic Trials Champion: Ryan Murphy – 1:53.95
  • Wave I Cut: 2:02.99
  • Wave II Cut: 2:00.81

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Destin Lasco (CAL) – 1:56.88
  2. Bryce Mefford (SMST) – 1:57.51
  3. Jack Aikins (SA) – 1:57.57
  4. Hunter Tapp (NCS) – 1:57.62
  5. Ryan Murphy (CAL) – 1:57.95
  6. Austin Katz (TXLA) – 1:58.09
  7. Daniel Carr (PPA) – 1:59.09
  8. Ian Grum (DYNA) – 1:59.23
  9. Shaine Casas (TAMU) – 1:59
  10. Clark Beach (FLOR) – 1:59.57
  11. Jacob Steele (ISC) – 2:00.28
  12. Will Grant (VS) – 2:00.41
  13. Tim Gallagher (UN-HI) – 2:00.55
  14. Nick Alexander (TRI) – 2:00.66
  15. Jack Dahlgren (UMIZ) – 2:00.67
  16. Alex Boratto (ALTO) – 2:00.71

Cal’s freshman sensation from NCAA season, Destin Lascohad a huge swim out of an early heat, dropping from 2:00.9 to 1:56.88. That’ll put the 19-year-old into the semifinals as the #1 prelims qualifier. Lasco is now the #17 U.S. man of any age, passing up Matt Grevers in the all-time ranks.

SwimAtlanta’s Jack Aikins crushed a 1:57.57 out of that same early heat. That ranks the 18-year-old #7 all-time in USA Swimming’s 17-18 rankings, tying 2016 Olympian Jacob Pebley.

All-in-all, those early-heat speedsters were a contrast to a pretty sleepy morning session from the circle-seeded heats. Three of the top four seeds came from non-circle-seeded heats, including NC State’s Hunter Tappwho dropped from 2:00.9 to 1:57.6 to win the second heat and wound up fourth overall.

Cal’s Bryce Mefford followed up his great 100 back with a 1:57.51 this morning in the 200. That’s just tenths from his career-best, put up at Summer Nationals in 2019.

The pre-meet favorites got into semifinals, but in lower places than expected. Defending Olympic champ Ryan Murphy is just fifth in 1:57.95. NCAA champ Shaine Casas sits just 9th in 1:59.52. Casas narrowly missed the Olympic team in the 100 back earlier this meet.

Cal men make up four of the top seven – and that’s without 2016 Olympian Jacob Pebley event swimming this meet. Lasco & Mefford (who swam for Cal at NCAAs this season) sit 1-2, alumnus Murphy is 5th and Daniel Carr (who swam as a senior for Cal this year) is 7th.

Indiana’s Jacob Steele was a Wave I wild card transfer. He won the 100 back at the Wave I meet, but made the Wave II semifinals in this 200 back. Steele sits 11th after going 2:00.28 this morning. That’s eight-tenths faster than his Wave I swim, but still about half a second shy of his lifetime-best from the summer of 2018.

Ryan Lochte was entered in both this race and the 200 IM, but he was a no-show for this race. That probably makes sense, as the 200 IM is a much better Olympic path for Lochte and the double would be rough on anyone, much less a 36-year-old. Louisville’s Nicolas Albiero was also a no-show this morning.

Women’s 200 breast

  • World Record: Rikke Moller Pedersen (DEN) – 2:19.11 (2013)
  • American Record: Rebecca Soni – 2:19.59 (2012)
  • US Open Record: Rebecca Soni (USA) – 2:20.38 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Viktoriya Zeynep Gunes (TUR) – 2:19.64 (2015)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Rie Kaneto (JPN) – 2:20.30
  • 2016 US Olympic Trials Champion: Lilly King – 2:24.08
  • Wave I Cut: 2:33.29
  • Wave II Cut: 2:30.49

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Annie Lazor (MVN) – 2:23.63
  2. Ella Nelson (NAC) – 2:25.35
  3. Lilly King (ISC) – 2:25.82
  4. Emily Escobedo (COND) – 2:26.18
  5. Bethany Galat (AGS) – 2:26.51
  6. Micah Sumrall (GAME) – 2:27.96
  7. Rachel Bernhardt (GAME) – 2:28.00
  8. Allie Raab (NAC) – 2:28.36
  9. Anna Keating (MACH) – 2:28.65
  10. Gillian Davey (KYA) – 2:28.77
  11. Isabelle Odgers (TASC) – 2:29.17
  12. Julia Poole (NCS) – 2:29.75
  13. Lindsey Kozelsky (UN-MN) – 2:29.85
  14. Mackenzie Looze (ISC) – 2:29.87
  15. Olivia Anderson (AQJT) – 2:30.24
  16. Zoe Bartel (FAST) – 2:30.32

One big theme of this morning is veterans responding to disappointment. Some big names who missed Olympic teams in their primary events (Dahlia, Smoliga) have fired off big swims in the heats, while others have either scratched out or struggled after early-meet disappointments.

Count Annie Lazor firmly in the bounce-back category. Lazor missed the Olympic team by 0.32 seconds in the 100 breast, but she crushed all comers in this 200 breast heats round. Lazor went 2:23.63 this morning, 1.7 seconds faster than any other swimmer. In fact, Lazor’s time is almost three seconds faster than the top time out of heats in this event in 2016 (2:26.2) and is faster than any other swimmer went in any round of 2016 Trials. (Lilly King led semifinals and the final with 2:24.0s in 2016).

Virginia/Nashville Aquatic Club swimmer Ella Nelson took second behind Lazor in her heat, and sits second overall as well. Nelson went 2:25.35, a time drop of six-tenths from her lifetime-best. Virginia has been on fire lately, including a 1-2 sweep of the 200 IM Olympic spots last night. Nelson was the NCAA runner-up in this event this season for UVA.

Lilly King sits third. She was out very fast, but faded over the final 50 – time will tell whether she shut it down late, or whether her 100-speed just ran out a little bit at the end of the longer breaststroke race. She leads Emily Escobedo and Bethany Galat among the top qualifiers this morning.

Madisyn Cox, the #5 seed, was a no-show this morning. Cox missed the Olympic team by .02 seconds in the 200 IM last night and also missed the final of the 400 IM. This 200 breast was her last event entry at Olympic Trials. Vanessa Pearl, the #7 seed coming into the meet, was also a no-show.

Meanwhile Georgia’s Zoie Hartman, who was an NCAA A finalist in the event, took a disqualification out of her heat.

Men’s 200 IM

  • World Record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1:54.00 (2011)
  • American Record: Ryan Lochte – 1:54.00 (2011)
  • US Open Record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1:54.56 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Hubert Kos (HUN) – 1:56.99 (2021)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:54.66
  • 2016 US Olympic Trials Champion: Michael Phelps – 1:55.91
  • Wave I Cut: 2:04.09
  • Wave II Cut: 2:03.02

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Michael Andrew (RPC) – 1:56.25
  2. Ryan Lochte (GSC) – 1:58.48
  3. Carson Foster (RAYS) – 1:58.95
  4. Chase Kalisz (ABSC) – 1:59.14
  5. Sam Stewart (YHF) – 1:59.15
  6. Kieran Smith (FLOR) – 1:59.31
  7. Andrew Seliskar (CAL) – 1:59.38
  8. Raunak Khosla (FMC) – 1:59.83
  9. Grant Sanders (GSC) – 2:00.32
  10. Jay Litherland (DYNA) – 2:00.43
  11. Grant House (SUN) – 2:00.52
  12. Jake Foster (RAYS) – 2:00.72
  13. Trenton Julian (ROSE) – 2:00.73
  14. Abrahm DeVine (TE) – 2:01.20
  15. Rick Mihm (ALTO) – 2:01.24
  16. Jason Louser (LIAC) – 2:01.26

As is tradition, Michael Andrew blasted a huge prelims swim, cutting six-tenths from his lifetime-best to go 1:56.25 for the top spot. That moves Andrew from #6 to #5 all-time among U.S. men. It’s a big jump from #5 to #4, currently held by Chase Kalisz at 1:55.40 from 2018.

The #1 swimmer in history (of any nationality) is Ryan Lochtewho made the semifinals easily in his bid for a 5th-straight Olympic team. Lochte went 1:58.48 swimming right next to Andrew in that heat.

Andrew’s swim came courtesy of a bruising front half in which he was under Lochte’s world record pace with 50 meters to go. Andrew led all qualifiers this morning by three full seconds at the 150-split. Even though his free split got under 30 seconds, Andrew will definitely have some swimmers closing on him in the next two rounds as a number of qualifiers went 28s on their freestyles this morning.

400 IM champ Chase Kalisz is into the final in 4th. His former Georgia teammate Jay Litherland, the other likely 400 IM Olympic entrant, also made the final. Carson Fosterwhom Litherland ran down for the second 400 IM spot on Sunday night, sits third with a solid swim of 1:58.95 this morning.

It’s going to be a semifinal field with a lot of potential multi-event Olympic qualifiers – that should help the men’s side get under the roster cap overall. 200/400 free winner Kieran Smith is sitting 6th, and 4×200 free relay member Andrew Seliskar is seventh.

Will Licon, the 10th seed, was a no-show this morning. So was Gunnar Bentz, who made the Olympic team via the 200 fly last night. #9 seed Josh Prenot didn’t compete – he indicated on social media that he’d be taking a hiatus from racing after missing semifinals of the 200 breast in his defense of a 2016 Olympic silver medal.

Cal’s Destin Lasco scratched out here after qualifying 1st in the 200 back earlier this session. Wave I wild card qualifier Jacob Steele of Indiana also scratched this half of the 200 back/200 IM double.

Former world junior record-holding 400 IMer Sean Grieshop was just on the outside in 17th, along with Michigan teammates Charlie Swanson (18th) and Tommy Cope (19th).

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Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

Finally, a different Simone to watch.

Beach bum jason
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

I love swimming far more then gymnastics but I can still recognize the greatest female gymnastast of all time and her Pursuit to help bring more medals to her home country.

AvidSwimFan
Reply to  Beach bum jason
1 month ago

So can most other people, but these ads are a bit much. I’m a fan but I’m sick of them as it is.

Eddie
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
1 month ago

You’re definitely NOT a fan

A C
Reply to  Eddie
1 month ago

I am not a fan, and that’s OK.

Swammerstein
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
1 month ago

WHAAA?? Networks focus on a few household names in the olympics?! And a pandemic delayed the olympics a year so we have to see the commercials longer!?!

MickeyMouse
Reply to  Swammerstein
1 month ago

It’s not even a few, it’s literally one. Respect Biles as much as the next but we’re begging NBC to please make and show more than 1 commercial.

Smith-King-Huske-Manuel
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
1 month ago

Uber Eats over and over and over again?

QQQ
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
1 month ago

DAMN! They get a few months once every 4 yrs (this time 5yrs) to make some money off they’re LIFETIME training and devotion. And likely never to make any real money again from their talents for the rest of their lives, at least nowhere near the same kind of money, once we’re one year out from the Olympics. So God forbid you have to watch some commercials for a couple months. You are a HATER! 🙄

Coach Mike 1952
Reply to  Beach bum jason
1 month ago

Yeah, but over & over & over & over & over (you get the point) again & again & again?

Corn Pop
Reply to  Coach Mike 1952
1 month ago

There is a trial coming up for the murdering 3 young Black males . Not by a Police Officer , but a US soldier who happens to be Biles’s brother. This needs a monstrous PR campaign to bury it.

Jeffery
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

mood

JJpbg
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

Like… gravity.

Brian
1 month ago

Oh swimming gods… please let lochte look good today that’s all I want

Sheeeeeeeeeesh
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

Who’s gonna tell him

Last edited 1 month ago by Sheeeeeeeeeesh
Guhan
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

It’s his last chance! he will try with everything he got! lets see. Its going to be kailisz and anyone else in the end

Emerson
Reply to  Guhan
1 month ago

Michael Andrew. Lochte has no chance.

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

I’m with you!

Mr Piano
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

Yea but it’s just prelims. I think he goes 1:58 mid in prelims then 1:57 low in semis. Hopefully he’s about a second faster tomorrow.

Little Mermaid
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

The only way he makes it maybe is with the new speedo 4.0 tech suit! Hey Now!

Swammerstein
Reply to  Brian
1 month ago

Let the old man strength flow through him once more!!!

NC Swammer
1 month ago

Is Hunter Armstrong entered in the 200 today? If so 1:53.0 incoming for prelims..

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  NC Swammer
1 month ago

I think he’s purely a sprinter

Meow
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

The Lydia Jacoby of men’s backstroke.

Sqiddy
1 month ago

200 IM guesses?

GATOR CHOMP 🐊
Reply to  Sqiddy
1 month ago

Hunter Armstrong

usaswimerror
Reply to  GATOR CHOMP 🐊
1 month ago

I guess Dean Farris has been replaced.

water
Reply to  Sqiddy
1 month ago

Chase will probably make it, but 2nd place is fairly open. I’m hoping seli can pull out a best time, but not too sure after his 2free. If Michael Andrew can be consistent then he’s most likely got it in the bag.

hungry-potato
Reply to  Sqiddy
1 month ago

Andrew will go 1:55 in prelims, semis. who knows about finals.

123456
Reply to  hungry-potato
1 month ago

31.0 last 50 in finals

Irish Ringer
Reply to  123456
1 month ago

29.8 last 50, maybe 29.5

Ew David!
Reply to  hungry-potato
1 month ago

My man needs to learn to control his prelims swims when 16 make it back. Still a relatively a young guy, but conserving your energy is the name of the game!

dddddddd
Reply to  hungry-potato
1 month ago

breaks world record twice in prelims and semis. 1:56 in finals

frug
Reply to  Sqiddy
1 month ago

Pain.

A C
Reply to  frug
1 month ago

Mr. T is in the house!

Friuti
1 month ago

Womens 100 Free and Men’s 200 IM will be very interesting this morning. Hoping for some positive surprises in both

PK Doesn't Like His Long Name
1 month ago

Huske right next to Comerford has some potential to look pretty rough.

swimmingfan101
1 month ago

I really think that we are underestimating the impact of the pandemic on swimmers, especially distance swimmers like Ledecky. I’ve seen at all levels – age group, college, pros – that the distance swimmers are having the hardest time getting back to where they were. Also Australia definitely had way more relaxed restrictions than the U.S. did at no fault of the swimmers from either country. Let’s try to be more understanding and hope that the Team USA will perform at their very best at the Olympics.

SwimmerFan99
Reply to  swimmingfan101
1 month ago

The more I think of it, the more I realize that the extent to which the United States was hit by the pandemic (more than any other country) might have had a disproportionate effect on their swimmers, especially relative to countries like Australia which basically never even had a pandemic (a mere 30k cases compared to the U.S.’ 34.3m). Ultimately this trials has indeed been a bit disappointing in terms of times… imagine if Tori Huske didn’t compete, for instance. That alone would make this meet somewhat of a disaster thus far. Hoping Dressel can light a spark over the next few days, and that their swimmers greatly benefit from the month before the Olympics start & training camp.

Last edited 1 month ago by SwimmerFan99
Little Mermaid
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

Why so many negative responses it is the truth, other countries had less restrictions, especially Australia, they had pools to swim in year round! Gyms to go and utilize! We will see the results in July, and then have all the Monday morning quarterback comments here on Swimswam, what if, could of, blah blah blah, plus I am sure Rowdy will throw some comments in about this as well, other countries practicing when others started late.

Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
Reply to  Little Mermaid
1 month ago

The assertion that the US was hit by the pandemic harder than any other country is simply false. Moreover the implication that the pandemic has affected USA Swimming harder than other countries’ swimming is laughable.

Just look at some of the swim events hosted and resumption of training in some states compared to the way things have been handled in other countries. Some countries have barely even got back in the water yet.

So yes, of course the USA has been hit hard by the pandemic, and this has undoubtedly affected performances, but trying to suggest that there is some sort of American exceptionalism is stupid. That’s probably why there are so many downvotes.

anonymous

No you are wrong USA was one of the hardest hit countries in the world. This is not disputed. The pandemic did cause massive problems for swimmers. Colleges were shutdown and their pools were unavailable. Maybe you are in denial that swimmers like Curzan was swimming with a tether on in a little backyard pool. MA borrowed someone’s one lane backyard pool. Kierin Smith swimming in 48 degree lake water and so on. Let’s not deny that some of these swimmers had Covid and some are OK and some like Ella Eastin face long term serious medical issues.

walter
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

This didn’t only happen to Americans.

Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

What on earth are you on about? At no point have I disputed the fact that the USA has been hard-hit. I made the point that the USA has not been hit HARDER than any other country, as the original comment clearly stated.

I was training at Loughborough University 2019-2020. When covid hit, all the gyms, all the pools, everything was closed. Lboro swimmers not lucky enough to be given a little jacuzzi-type paddling pool were also training in paddling pools with tethers to their backs.
This is my whole point, there was no American exceptionalism. Americans might have been training that way, but so was everyone else. Read my comment before jumping to conclusions.

So no, I… Read more »

SwimmerFan99

The United States of America has had more COVID-19 cases than any other country on planet Earth AND the most deaths by far (and is even among the top for both categories per capita too). Also, Australia “might have had it slightly better”? 34,366,000 cases compared to 30,300. 616,200 deaths compared to 910. That’s ‘slightly’? Perhaps instead of arrogantly and nonsensically claiming others should do research, you should do your own.

Snarky
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

“It will magically go away”

Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

There’s doing research, and there’s quoting big numbers and assuming it’s the same thing.

On deaths per capita, USA are a whopping 20 in the world (Johns Hopkins), way off hardest hit, and that’s before you even consider the fact that a number of countries do not have the capability or methodology to track deaths and cases related to Covid in the same way that the USA do. Incidentally, 20th is one behind the UK, and you’re trying to tell me that the USA has somehow had it worse?

Take Peru as an example earlier this month of how less developed countries are struggling to document covid cases; they adjusted their official figure drastically from 70k to 185k.

But… Read more »

SwimmerFan99

Very strange implicit assumption that I’m American here. Also, I never claimed the virus “selectively picked out America to have a field day”; I’m just stating the numbers. The United States was the country most affected by COVID-19 thus far, as the numbers I stated clearly indicate, and Australia is nowhere in the conversation, having effectively lived as normal during the entirety of the pandemic – again, with 910 deaths compared to 616,200. Australia’s restrictions for the past 1.5 years have been NOTHING compared to the vast majority of the United States (if not the entirety). Do not conflate the U.S.’ current state this week with “Michael Phelps taking his toddler to see Olympic Trials” with what it has gone… Read more »

Joel
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

Our lack of cases in Australia was BECaUSE we were locked down for a while. No gyms or pools for April or May 2020 and much longer in the state of Victoria.

Robbos
Reply to  Joel
1 month ago

Stop using commonsense against some of these comments!!!!
OK I’ll try it, the whole world got affected by this pandemic, but the reactions were all different (not debating what was right or wrong) but Australia had low numbers per capita was because we had lockdowns, Pools, Gyms, Schools, work, sporting events, Pubs, Restaurants all closed, state borders closed, cities closed all lockdowns, Public meetings & Sporting events not all allowed.

SwimmerFan99
Reply to  Joel
1 month ago

Lmao, you do realize gyms in much of the U.S. have been closed in *several* waves of months, including the most recent wave of shutdowns from April 2021 until September 2021?

CanSwimFan
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

Canada imposed lengthy lockdowns and pool closures and and far greater restrictions. Even elite swimmers had no competition opportunities from March 2020 to May 2021 – and then only an in-house time trial and tiny meet for top swimmers. US swimmers didn’t face anything close.

Swimlikefishdrinklikefish
Reply to  swimmingfan101
1 month ago

How many kids got Covid at some point at this meet? Probably a lot more proportionally than aus

anonymous
Reply to  Swimlikefishdrinklikefish
1 month ago

Ella Eastin got a serious complication from Covid which ended her swim career and has impacted her life so no it is not a hoax.

DutchinUSA
Reply to  swimmingfan101
1 month ago

Yes for Australia perhaps, definitely no for Europe.

Comet
Reply to  swimmingfan101
1 month ago

KL went her second or third best time in the 200 free just two months ago. She also has the two fastest times in both the 800 and 1500 free. MA and Huske set two ARs each in their events and they have been plethora of top 10 times in each event. I am not sure about Manuel but she seems under raced, i retrospect she should have done ISL. Weitzeil who did seems a lot more race sharp

Robbos
Reply to  swimmingfan101
1 month ago

You are wrong about Australia, we had very severe lock downs. Pools gyms all closed.

Sheeeeeeeeeesh
1 month ago

┏┓
┃┃╱╲ in this
┃╱╱╲╲ house
╱╱╭╮╲╲ we love
▔▏┗┛▕▔ and support
╱▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔▔╲
Lydia Jacoby
╱╱┏┳┓╭╮┏┳┓ ╲╲
▔▏┗┻┛┃┃┗┻┛▕▔
And denounce ANY form of bullying

DMSWIM
Reply to  Sheeeeeeeeeesh
1 month ago

How long did this take you to make?

Sheeeeeeeeeesh
Reply to  DMSWIM
1 month ago

Copied the format from Twitter so 30 seconds

Aqqq
Reply to  Sheeeeeeeeeesh
1 month ago

cringe as hell, yall are overreacting way too badly

Mr Piano
Reply to  Aqqq
1 month ago

For real though lmao. All King said was that she tried to get in her head. Jacoby said she enjoyed talking to King in the ready room, so King obviously didn’t say anything that made her feel uncomfortable.

Pool
Reply to  Sheeeeeeeeeesh
1 month ago

Who is bullying her and why? She had a great swim

Swim Nerd
Reply to  Pool
1 month ago

Asking the same thing. And who here is saying negative things about a teenage Olympian?

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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