2023 U.S. Open Championships — Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2023 U.S. OPEN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

On Saturday night, the final session of the 2023 U.S. Open Championships will take place, with the women’s and men’s 1500 free, 200 back, 100 free, 200 breast, and 200 fly finals set to take place.

Opening the session will be the 1500 free races, where Katie Ledecky and Bobby Finke will be expected to win their respective races.

Next comes the women’s 200 back, where a battle between Summer McIntosh, Claire Curzan, Regan Smith, and Phoebe Bacon will take place. Headlining the men’s version of this event is world champion Hubert Kos, who came out of prelims as the top seed by 0.03 of a second over Kieran Smith.

Siobhan Haughey, the top performer of 2023 in the 100 free, will head into the event on Saturday night as the heavy favorite. However, keep out for names like Abbey Weitzeil, Simone Manuel (who broke 54 for the first time since 2021 in prelims), Gretchen Walsh, and Torri Huske as well. Ryan Held is the top seed in the men’s 100 free ‘A’ final, but the ‘B’ final is also highly anticipated, with Shaine Casas and Caeleb Dressel both set to swim in that heat. Notably, Casas has broken two U.S. Open meet records so far out of the ‘B’ final.

Kate Douglass looks to take her third victory of this meet as the top seed in the women’s 200 breast, while Cody Miller is coming off his fastest 200 breast swim since 2019 that came during prelims. He’ll have a battle with 2023 world bronze medalist Matt Fallon, who was 0.06 seconds slower than him in prelims.

The 200 fly will conclude the night, with Regan Smith and Michal Chmielewski being the top seeds in the women’s and men’s races respectively. Smith will attempt the 200 back/200 fly double, while Chimelewski will look to back up his U.S. Open meet record from prelims.

Watch the live stream here, courtesy of USA Swimming:

Women’s 1500 Freestyle — Finals

Top 8:

  1. Katie Ledecky — 15:46.38
  2. Paige Madden — 16:11.26
  3. Leah Smith — 16:15.45
  4. Ching Hwee Gan — 16:24.71
  5. Chase Travis — 16:39.91
  6. Elle Braun — 16:39.96
  7. Aly Breslin — 16:47.96
  8. Kate McCarville — 16:48.71

To nobody’s surprise, Katie Ledecky came out victorious in the women’s 1500 free, touching the wall nearly 25 seconds ahead of her competitors. However, her final time of 15:46.38 was slightly slower than the 15:44.13 that she clocked at this meet last year.

Coming in second was Paige Madden, who shaved over 18 seconds off her personal best time of 16:29.63 from this summer’s TYR Pro Championships and went 16:11.26. Leah Smith finished third in 16:15.46 in her first time swimming this event since March 2021.

Men’s 1500 Freestyle — Finals

  • World Record: 14:31.02, Sun Yang (2012)
  • American Record:  14:31.59, Bobby Finke (2023)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 14:55.46, Damien Joly (2017)
  • U.S. Open Record: 14:42.81, Bobby Finke (2023)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 15:39.89

Top 8:

  1. Bobby Finke — 15:03.91
  2. Charlie Clark — 15:05.57
  3. Luke Whitlock — 15:08.09
  4. David Johnston — 15:08.09
  5. Eric Brown — 15:18.02
  6. Krzysztof Chmielewski — 15:18.26
  7. Ilia Sibirtsev — 15:21.29
  8. Will Gallant — 15:25.69

2023 U.S. World Championships team members Bobby Finke and Charlie Clark went 1-2 in the men’s 1500 free, with Finke winning by around a second and a half. Clark had been ahead of Finke for the first 1100 meters of the race, but Finke pulled out his typical back-half speed and pulled past Clark toward the end of the race.

Placing third was Florida commit Luke Whitlock, who went 15:08.09. His time was a massive personal best, taking over 14 seconds off his previous best of 15:22.22 from Winter Juniors. This October, he dipped under 15 seconds in short course for the first time in his career.

WOMEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE – FINALS

  • World Record: 2:03.14, Kaylee McKeown (2023)
  • American Record: 2:03.35, Regan Smith (2019)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 2:05.28, Regan Smith (2022)
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:03.80, Regan Smith (2023)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:13.59

Top 8:

  1. Regan Smith — 2:04.27
  2. Claire Curzan — 2:06.39
  3. Summer McIntosh — 2:06.81
  4. Phoebe Bacon — 2:07.49
  5. Kennedy Noble – 2:10.07
  6. Leah Shackley — 2:10.23
  7. Aviv Barzelay — 2:10.72
  8. Anna Peplowski — 2:12.37

Regan Smith won the women’s 200 back by over two seconds, crushing her own U.S. Open meet record time of 2:05.28 from last year. She flipped at the halfway mark in 1:00.74, which was just 0.01 under Kaylee McKeown‘s world record pace. Although she couldn’t quite match McKeown’s final world record time, her mark from the U.S. Open was faster than the 2:04.94 she went to earn silver at the World Championships this year.

Claire Curzan finished second with a time of 2:06.39, just 0.04 seconds off her best time from Nationals. She’s been on a tear in the backstroke events at this meet, as she set a personal best in the 100 back on Friday night. Finishing in third was Summer McIntosh, who showed off her versatility by getting under 2:07 for the first time in her career.

MEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE – FINALS

  • World Record: 1:51.92, Aaron Peirsol (2009)
  • American Record: 1:51.92, Aaron Peirsol (2009)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 1:54.59, Nicholas Thoman (2009)
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:53.08, Aaron Peirsol (2009)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:01.69

Top 8:

  1. Hubert Kos — 1:55.95
  2. Kieran Smith — 1:57.51
  3. Kai Van Westering — 1:58.63
  4. Brandon Miller — 1:59.25
  5. Benedek Kovacs —2:00.14
  6. Yeziel Morales — 2:00.86
  7. JT Ewing — 2:00.97
  8. Hunter Tapp — 2:05.15

200 back world champion Hubert Kos also took home a U.S. Open title in the event, wining by nearly two seconds. His performance ties his performance from this April’s Westmont Pro Series as his second-fastest swim ever, behind the 1:54.14 he clocked to win the world title this year.

Placing second was Kieran Smith, who dropped a huge chunk of time off his previous best of 1:58.43 from April 2023. Indiana sophomore Kai Van Westering went 1:58.63 to place third.

Notably, Jack Aikins went 1:56.82 to win the ‘B’ final, which would have been fast enough to take second in the ‘A’ final.

WOMEN’S 100 FREESTYLE – FINALS

  • World Record: 51.71, Sarah Sjostrom (2017)
  • American Record: 52.04, Simone Manuel (2019)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 53.42, Erika Brown (2019)
  • U.S. Open Record: 52.54, Simone Manuel (2018)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 55.79

Top 8:

  1. Siobhan Haughey — 52.94
  2. Torri Huske — 53.17
  3. Abbey Weitzeil — 53.53
  4. Simone Manuel — 53.65
  5. Gretchen Walsh — 53.95
  6. Olivia Smoliga — 54.83
  7. Mary Sophie-Harvey — 55.03
  8. Katharine Berkoff — 55.40

Pre-race favorite Siobhan Haughey led from start to finish, being the only person in the field under 53 seconds and taking a considerable amount of time off Erika Brown’s U.S. Open meet record from 2019.

Finishing in second was Torri Huske, who went 53.17 and was just 0.25 off her personal best time of 52.92. She was also faster than her 2022-23 season-best of 53.41.

Abbey Weitzeil placed third in 53.53, while Simone Manuel continues her career resurgence by posting her fastest 100 free time since November 2020.

MEN’S 100 FREESTYLE – FINALS

  • World Record: 46.86, David Popovici (2022)
  • American Record: 46.96, Caeleb Dressel (2019)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 47.69, Zach Apple (2019)
  • U.S. Open Record: 47.39, Ryan Held/Caeleb Dressel (2019/2021)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 49.99

Top 8:

  1. Matt King — 48.30
  2. Ryan Held — 48.36
  3. Chris Guiliano — 48.51
  4. Drew Kibler — 48.71
  5. Nandor Nemeth — 48.77
  6. Rafael Miroslaw — 48.89
  7. Brooks Curry — 49.02
  8. Santo Condorelli — 49.37

Ryan Held had a very strong start, but ultimately it was Matt King who was leading at the halfway mark and then ended up winning. His final time of 48.30 was the third-fastest performance of his entire career, behind the 47.99 and 47.93 100 frees that he clocked at Nationals this June.

Held ended up finishing 0.06 behind King, while Notre Dame junior Chris Guiliano placed third in 48.51. He was 47.9 in the long course prelims of his mid-season college invite a few weeks ago.

Josh Liendo won the ‘B’ final in a time of 48.60 while Caeleb Dressel finished second with a 48.85, marking his first time breaking 49 since the 2022 World Championships. Meanwhile, Shaine Casas broke his ‘B’ final win streak, placing sixth in 49.04.

WOMEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE – FINALS

  • World Record: 2:17.55, Evgeniia Chikunova (2023)
  • American Record: 2:19.59, Rebecca Soni (2012)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 2:22.00 Emily Escobedo (2019)
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:20.38, Rebecca Soni (2009)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:31.69

Top 8:

  1. Kate Douglass — 2:21.87
  2. Lilly King — 2:23.98
  3. Kotryna Tetrekova — 2:24.22
  4. Alex Walsh — 2:25.39
  5. Ella Nelson — 2:25.98
  6. Marina Garcia Urzainqui — 2:27.15
  7. Katja Pavicevic — 2:29.51
  8. Lydia Jacoby — 2:32.81

Just like during prelims, Kate Douglass dominated the finals of the women’s 200 breast. Her domestic rival Lilly King touched 0.11 seconds ahead of her at the 50-meter mark, but she was leader for the rest of the race, touching the wall at the finish over two seconds before King.

Douglass’s final time of 2:21.87 was 0.55 off her personal best of 2:21.22 set at Nationals this June, but it was her fourth-fastest performance ever. Meanwhile, King finished off with a time of 2:23.98.

Placing third was Lithuanian swimmer Kotryna Tetrekova, who clocked a 2:24.22.

MEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE – FINALS

  • World Record: 2:05.48, Qin Haiyang (2023)
  • American Record: 2:07.17, Josh Prenot (2016)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 2:09.67, Cody Miller (2019)
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:07.17, Josh Prenot (2016)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:15.99

Top 8:

  1. Matt Fallon — 2:09.49
  2. Cody Miller — 2:09.84
  3. Josh Matheny — 2:10.49
  4. Denis Petrashov — 2:10.61
  5. Lyubomir Epitropov — 2:11.88
  6. Will Licon — 2:12.05
  7. Adam Chillingworth — 2:13.19
  8. Joshua Chen — 2:13.46

Matt Fallon once again proved that he was the best 200 breaststroker in America, touching first in a time of 2:09.49 and breaking Cody Miller‘s U.S. Open meet record from 2019. He raced in typical Matt Fallon fashion, turning at the 50-meter mark in seventh place but then gaining full control of the lead after the halfway point.

In second was Miller himself, who was just 0.04 of a second slower than his morning swim. Josh Matheny, who had been leading in the front half of the race and tied with Fallon at the halfway point, finished third in 2:10.49.

Louisville’s Denis Petrashov was fourth with a time of 2:10.61, clocking his fastest time since he went 2:10.07 at the Tokyo Olympics.

WOMEN’S 200 BUTTERFLY – FINALS

  • World Record: 2:01.81, Zige Liu (2009)
  • American Record: 2:03.86, Regan Smith (2023)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 2:07.20, Susan O’Neill (1999)
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:03.86, Regan Smith (2023)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:13.69

Top 8:

  1. Regan Smith — 2:06.72
  2. Lindsay Looney — 2:09.31
  3. Dakota Luther — 2:10.17
  4. Leah Gingrich — 2:11.35
  5. Charlotte Hook — 2:11.80
  6. Tess Howley — 2:12.04
  7. Sofia Sartori — 2:12.37
  8. Lillie Nordmann — 2:13.00

Regan Smith dominated the women’s 200 fly, taking down her second meet record of the night and wining by nearly three seconds. Her final time of 2:06.72 beat out Susie O’Neil’s 24-year-old standing U.S. Open meet record.

In second was Smith’s ASU training partner Lindsay Looney with a 2:09.31, while Dakota Luther clocked a 2:10.17 for third.

MEN’S 200 BUTTERFLY – FINALS

  • World Record: 1:50.34, Kristof Milak (2022)
  • American Record: 1:51.51, Michael Phelps (2009)
  • U.S. Open Meet Record: 1:54.88, Michal Chmielewski (2023)
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:52.20, Michael Phelps (2008)
  • 2024 Olympic Trials Cut: 2:00.49

Top 8:

  1. Ilya Kharun — 1:54.66
  2. Martin Espernberger — 1:54.69
  3. Trenton Julian — 1:55.59
  4. Michal Chmielewski — 1:56.36
  5. Richard Marton — 1:57.09
  6. Luca Urlando — 1:57.38
  7. Zach Harting — 1:58.01
  8. Gustavo Saldo — 1:58.53

Ilya Kharun led from start to finish in the men’s 200 fly, breaking Michal Chimielewski’s championship record that was set Saturday morning. However, he was challenged by a charging Martin Espernberger, who out-split him on the final 100 and finished just 0.03 seconds behind him in second place.

Espernberger improved on his best time of 1:55.01 set at the Tennessee Invite two weeks ago.

In third was Trenton Julian, while Chmielewski added over a second from prelims and placed fourth.

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Brendan Gaffney
2 months ago

Are there no videos of the 100 free anywhere?

Can Nuck
3 months ago

Oleksiak- Will she ever race again?

Troyy
3 months ago

Temple just broke Liendo’s Commonwealth 100 fly record with 50.25 at Japan Open !!

Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

Lol I almost posted this but thought people would get mad for being off topic. We really need just a random comment thread on SwimSwam for people to post whenever they want.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

It’s big enough news that the peanut gallery isn’t likely to get too triggered.

Summer Love
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Yeah there should be a pinned thread for random comments.

ScovaNotiaSwimmer
Reply to  Summer Love
3 months ago

This site is missing a moderated forum.

fsfd
3 months ago

interesting to see mcintosh in the 2 breast c final (got in as first reserve). won it in 2:30:43 (about 8 tenths off her PB 02:29.64)

Last edited 3 months ago by fsfd
Bruhmoment
3 months ago

Chen and chillingworth werent in the A final. It was jassen yep and chase kaliz who DQd

Summer Love
3 months ago

I can’t believe Susie O’Neill US open record lasted for 24 years 😳

Calvin
3 months ago

Why didn’t summer swim the 2 fly?

Summer Love
Reply to  Calvin
3 months ago

Because she chose to swim 200 back for the day.

Not-so-silent Observer
Reply to  Summer Love
3 months ago

And 200 Br

Alex Wilson
3 months ago

Sun Devil swimmers Regan Smith and Hubert Kos took the woman’s and men’s top individual points awards. Sun Devil Swimming took 1st in both woman’s and men’s team awards and the Team combined team award.

Summer Love
Reply to  Alex Wilson
3 months ago

Bob Bowman is currently the best US swimming coach.

Periodt.

Alex Wilson
Reply to  Alex Wilson
3 months ago

Sun Devil Swimming did the above without top swimmer Leon Marchand who is recovering from illness!

Swim Nerd
Reply to  Alex Wilson
3 months ago

Todd DeSorbo 🤔

Not-so-silent Observer
Reply to  Swim Nerd
3 months ago

Safe to say the US has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to quality coaches.

The hot hand gets passed around and currently Bob is in possession

About Yanyan Li

Yanyan Li

Although Yanyan wasn't the greatest competitive swimmer, she learned more about the sport of swimming by being her high school swim team's manager for four years. She eventually ventured into the realm of writing and joined SwimSwam in January 2022, where she hopes to contribute to and learn more about …

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