2021 Pro Swim Series – Indianapolis: Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2021 PRO SWIM SERIES – INDIANAPOLIS (#5)

The final night of the Pro Swim Series – Indianapolis finishes with four events: the 100 back, 200 breast, 50 free, and 200 IM.

In the women’s 100 back, Regan Smith enters finals seeded nearly two seconds ahead of the field. The competition for second will be tight, with Catie Deloof, Amy Bilquist, Phoebe Bacon, and Linnea Mack all finishing within .3 of each other in prelims.

The 200 breast this morning saw Emily Escobedo cruise to the top seed over Lilly King, who finished nearly three seconds behind her. King will certainly be faster tonight, making a tight race very likely.

The men’s 50 free will see a slew of Olympic hopefuls racing across the two finals. The A-final of the event includes a pair of Olympians competing in the outside lanes, with Nathan Adrian and Ryan Held both looking to improve upon their finishes from prelims. Held is currently tied for the second-fastest American during the Olympic qualifying period in the event with Michael Andrew, who chose to race the 200 IM tonight. The B-final also features the reigning Olympic gold medalist in the event, Anthony Ervin.

Kate Douglass will be in for a double tonight as she enters both the 200 IM as the top-seeded swimmer.

Women’s 100 Back Finals

  • PSS Record: 58.18, Regan Smith (2020)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 1:01.49
  1. Regan Smith – 58.77
  2. Phoebe Bacon – 59.62
  3. Catie Deloof – 59.71

Out .2 faster than her prelims swim, Smith cruised to a win by a wide margin in the 100 back. She was still well off of her best time in the event, a 57.57 that was rattled by Australian Kaylee Mckeon this morning with her 57.63.

Phoebe Bacon had a large drop from her prelims time to take the silver in 59.62. The 2021 NCAA champion in the 200 back and bronze medalist in the 100 back, her best time is from the 2019 US Open where she hit 58.63.

Rounding out the podium in the event was Catie Deloof, who after setting a lifetime best this morning in the event dropped even further during finals. She broke 1:00 in the event for the first time to touch in 59.71.

Men’s 100 Back Finals

  • PSS Record: 52.40, David Plummer (2018)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut:  55.51
  1. Hunter Armstrong – 53.69
  2. Matt Grevers – 54.27
  3. Will Grant – 54.28

Cracking into the top-10 in the world for this year, Hunter Armstrong dropped nearly a second from his swim from prelims to take first ahead of Grevers. He was out fast, hitting the wall at the 50 in 25.97. He now sits as the third fastest American in the event this year, ranked behind Justin Ress and Ryan Murphy. He easily held off 2012 Olympic gold medalist Matt Grevers to take the win with Will Grant of Harvard University rounding out the top three.

Women’s 200 Breast Final

  • PSS Record: 2:20.77, Annie Lazor (2019)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 2:30.49
  1. Lilly King – 2:21.82
  2. Emily Escobedo – 2:22.81
  3. Ella Nelson – 2:26.81

After holding nearly a second lead in the race after the first 50, Lilly King never looked back on her way to winning the event. Escobedo was able to tighten the gap over the last 50 meters, but wasn’t able to catch King, who swam to a season-best time and held her world ranking of 5th.

While she wasn’t able to catch King, Escobedo was able to improve upon her own season-best time, as well as improving her world ranking in the event. She now sits as the 9th fastest this year.

While she well well behind the top two finishers, Ella Nelson easily took third, finishing almost two seconds ahead of 4th place swimmer Bethany Galat.

Men’s 200 Breast Final

  • PSS Record: 2:08.95, Andrew Wilson (2018)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 2:15.28
  1. Alex Evdokimov – 2:12.10
  2. Anton McKee – 2:12.24
  3. Miquel Chavez – 2:12.74

Trailing early in the race, Alex Evdokimov of Pinnacle Racing gained through the back half of the race to take the win over Anton McKee by .14. Entering the turn at the 150, nearly the top five finishers in the event were all roughly the same, with Evdokimov closing the race faster.

Third place in the event went to Mexican National Miquel Chavez competing for Team Elite. A former Division II swimmer at Missouri S&T, Chavez touched in 2:12.74, a new lifetime best of over a second.

After setting the Jordanian national record in the event this morning, Amro Al-Wir took the event out fast, before the being caught by the rest of the field. His national record was set this morning in prelims, when he touched in 2:12.40.

Women’s 50 Free Final

  • PSS Record: 24.17, Sarah Sjostrom (2016)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 25.65
  1. Kate Douglass – 24.54
  2. Erika Brown – 24.87
  3. Catie Deloof – 25.05

In her first event of the night, Kate Douglass cruised to the win in 24.54, easily ahead of Erika Brown and Catie Deloof. That swim knocks over a tenth off of her time from this morning and is a new lifetime best for her in the event. Her time passes Erika Brown to enter the top-10 for all-time American swims, ranking 10th.

Both Brown and Deloof also shaved time off their prelims swims, with Brown dropping nearly half a second for the silver medal. She was still slightly off her best in the event, a 24.57 from the Pro Swim Series in Knoxville last year.

Men’s 50 Free Finals

  • PSS Record: 21.51, Caeleb Dressel (2020)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 22.71
  1. Nathan Adrian – 22.13
  2. Koko Bratanov – 22.25
  3. Michael Chadwick – 22.29

After a slow breakout, United States national team staple Nathan Adrian powered to the win, running down the field over the last 15 meters.

Finishing right behind Adrian was Texax A&M swimmer Koko Bratanov and Michael Chadwick. While Chadwick was slightly off of his best in the event, Bratanov was nearly a half-second faster.

Women’s 200 IM Finals

  • PSS Record: 2:08.66, Katinka Hosszu (2015)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 2:15.26
  1. Alex Walsh – 2:10.67
  2. Kate Douglass – 2:10.74
  3. Beata Nelson – 2:13.01

In her second event of the night, Douglass took the race out fast, touching first after the fly. After falling to 4th during the backstroke. She was able to regain second during the breaststroke leg but ultimately wasn’t able to run down Walsh, who held on for the win. While Walsh was slightly off of her lifetime best, Douglass dropped over half of a second from her lifetime best, a 2:11.47 that she swam this morning in prelims. Beata Nelson rounded out the top three, with the former Wisconsin Badger dropping .36 from her lifetime best from 2019.

Men’s 200 IM Final

  • PSS Record: 1:56.32, Michael Phelps (2012)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 2:03.02
  1. Michael Andrew – 1:56.84
  2. Grant House – 2:00.30
  3. Angel Martinez – 2:00.55

Narrowly missing his lifetime best and only half of a second off of Michael Phelps’ Pro Swim Series record, Michael Andrew won handily, leading the race from start to finish. With his time he now sits as the 4th ranked swimmer in the event worldwide this year.

Following Andrew into the wall was Grant House, who touched just off of his best time of 2:00.05 from 2018. Fromer Texas A&M Aggie Angel Martinez was just behind him, setting a new personal best of 2:00.55. His previous best was 2:01.46 just just two weeks ago.

Women’s 800 Free Final

  • PSS Record: 8:06.68, Katie Ledecky (2016)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 8:44.01
  1.  Ally McHugh – 8:26.24
  2.  Emma Nordin – 8:27:44
  3.  Sierra Schmidt – 8:27.54

After trailing early in the race to Nordin, Ally McHugh broke out over the last 400 meters to win a tight race between the top three and Leah Smith, who took fourth. With her swim, McHugh now ranks as the 11th fastest performer in the world this year.

After leading early, Nordin wasn’t able to keep up as McHugh swam past her in the back half of the race. Nordin was able to hold off Sierra Schmidt, who was just .1 behind her, as well as Leah Smith, who finished only .06 off the podium.

Men’s 800 Free Final

  • PSS Record: 7:49.94, Michael McBroom (2014)
  • Wave II Olympic Trials Cut: 8:08.95
  1. Marwan El Kamash – 7:53.28
  2. Alfonso Mestre – 7:55.69
  3. Zane Grothe – 7:59.33

After Mestre raced to a large lead early on, it was Marwan El Kamash who came back strong, taking the win over Mestre and Grothe in the FINA Olympic A time of 7:53.28. That time is just over a second off of his lifetime best in the race, a 7:52.19 from last November’s US Open.

Although he fell off significantly after leading early, Mestre still was able to shave over a second off of his lifetime best in the event. Zane Grothe, who took 11th in the event at the 2019 World Championships, finished in 3rd.

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Drake
1 month ago

MA 1:54.9 😏

He said what?
1 month ago

You saw Regan tighten about 15-20 meters from the wall. She needs rest and then the easy speed will come.

Swimmerj
Reply to  He said what?
1 month ago

Agreed. I’m not too worried about her, she looked like she got hit by a truck after that race, seems exhausted

MX4x50relay
Reply to  He said what?
1 month ago

The last bit did look rough

Swimfan
Reply to  MX4x50relay
1 month ago

And yet she still goes 58.77 what a stud!!!

Awsi Dooger
Reply to  MX4x50relay
1 month ago

Last bit has looked rough virtually every race since the world championship finals. Lots of assuming going on that a magic button will be pushed. In 2019 Regan was on ascend. Nothing was out of reach at that point. She was totally relaxed. I thought the interview the other day was very revealing, when asked if the lead up to her first Olympics was everything she expected. The announcer expected yes. But Regan looked emotional and emphasized it was anything but what she expected, given such a difficult year. She may narrowly prevail on talent alone but I don’t think the taper upside is anything close to what some are projecting.

NoFlyKick
Reply to  He said what?
1 month ago

Smoliga just went 58.31 in Atlanta.

Drama King
Reply to  NoFlyKick
1 month ago

Rhyan White 58.43.
Where is Baker ?

Smith-King-Dahlia-Manuel
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

Where is Kathleen Baker?

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Smith-King-Dahlia-Manuel
1 month ago

Probably at home polishing her Olympic medals.

NoFlyKick
Reply to  Smith-King-Dahlia-Manuel
1 month ago

IDK, but Claire Curzan just went 58.82. The ladies are popping off 58s in the 100 LCM bk like it’s eating candy! This event has gone to a whole new level. Definitely gonna be multiple 58 owners that will watch the Olympics on TV.

Swimfan
1 month ago

Smith 58.77!!! Excited for next month trials