2017 Aussie National C’ships Day 3 Finals Live Recap

2017 AUSTRALIAN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

MEN’S 100 BACKSTROKE – FINAL

Although double world champion Mitch Larkin retained his 100m backstroke national title, he did so in a slightly lackluster fashion. Whereas last year’s meet, which served as the nation’s Olympic Trials, saw the now-23-year-old take gold in a time of 52.54, Larkin mustered just a 53.54 here in Brisbane.

Splitting 25.85/27.69, the newly-minted Commercial Swimming Club athlete is now positioned as 3rd fastest in the world rankings, but his outing missed the Aussie-mandated QT of 53.39. Larkin has already qualified for Budapest in the 200m backstroke, a race in which the Olympic silver medalist said he ‘had a hard time finding his groove.’ As such, he could still be discretionarily selected to also swim the 100m backstroke at the 2017 World Championships.

2016-2017 LCM MEN 100 BACK

JiayuCHN
XU
04/12
51.86
2Matt
GREVERS
USA52.2607/30
3Ryan
MURPHY
USA52.3407/26
4Ryosuke
IRIE
JPN52.8007/30
5Evgeny
RYLOV
RUS52.8907/30
View Top 26»

West Coast Swimmer Zac Incerti did his best to keep with Larkin in the race, taking silver in a new personal best of 53.95. For the 20-year-old, tonight marks the first time dipping under the 54-second barrier. For bronze medal winner Joshua Beaver, his time tonight sits just outside the 53.95 he produced in Rio for 13th place at the 2016 Olympic Games.

MEN’S 200 IM – FINAL

  • Swimming Australia QT –1:58.54
  • The Podium:
    • Clyde Lewis – 1:59.24
    • Travis Mahoney – 2:00.62
    • Jared Gilliland – 2:01.18

19-year-old St. Peters Western swimmer Clyde Lewis picked the right time to PB in his specialty event, the men’s 200m IM, taking his new personal fastest beneath the 2-minute mark for the first time in his young career. Lewis took gold tonight in 1:59.24, hacking 3 seconds off of his 2:02.31 morning swim and .85 off of his previous PB of 2:00.09. This represents Lewis’ first senior national title and his outing now checks in as the 7th fastest performance in Australian history.

The 2015 World Junior Champion in this event, Lewis paced his race smartly, leading wire-to-wire and firing off the only sub-26 butterfly leg and 29-second backstroke leg of the field for a swift first half.  Silver medalist in the race tonight, Travis Mahoney of Marion Swimming Club, was just over a second behind, stopping the clock at 2:00.62, while bronze medalist Jared Gilliland earned 2:01.18 in the race.

Lewis already earned bronze in the 200m backstroke this meet, so the kid is racing hot in Brisbane. The bad news for him, however, is that his new 200m IM PB falls short of the 1:58.54 QT needed to make the Budapest roster in this event.

On the whole, with Japanese, American, Chinese and other swimmers well under the 2-minute barrier and into the 1:56 and 1:57 range, the green and gold have quite a lot of work to do in this event to have any kind of impact on an international level.

2016-2017 LCM MEN 200 IM

ChaseUSA
KALISZ
07/27
1.55.56
2Phillip
HEINTZ
GER1.55.7606/16
3Kosuke
HAGINO
JPN1.56.0107/27
4Wang
SHUN
CHN1.56.1604/14
5Max
LITCHFIELD
GBR1.56.6407/26
6Abrahm
DEVINE
USA1.56.7907/01
7Jeremy
DESPLANCHES
SUI1.56.8607/26
8Daiya
SETO
JPN1.56.9009/09
9Haiyang
QIN
CHN1.57.06*WJR07/27
10Josh
PRENOT
USA1.57.1407/01
View Top 26»

WOMEN’S 200 FREESTYLE – FINAL

  • Swimming Australia QT –1:56.95
  • The Podium:
    • Emma McKeon – 1:55.68
    • Ariarne Titmus – 1:58.11
    • Kotuku Ngawati – 1:58.24

The reigning Olympic bronze medalist in this event, Emma McKeon, got the job done tonight in Brisbane, crushing the competition with her Budapest-qualifying mark of 1:55.68. This makes 2 individual national titles for the 22-year-old St. Peters Western star, as McKeon already notched a win in the 100m butterfly, while also scoring a silver in the 100m freestyle. As such, McKeon is slated to attack a potential 6-event line-up at the 2017 World Championships, consisting of the aforementioned trio of individual races, in addition to 3 Aussie relays.

With her result tonight, McKeon checks in as the 2nd fastest swimmer in the world this season, just .04 off of Sweden’s Michelle Coleman. McKeon has now won the 200m freestyle at the last 4 consecutive Australian National LCM Championships.

2016-2017 LCM WOMEN 200 FREE

KatieUSA
LEDECKY
07/25
1.54.69
2Federica
PELLEGRINI
ITA1.54.7307/26
3Emma
McKEON
AUS1.54.9907/25
4Veronika
POPOVA
RUS1.55.0807/25
5Sarah
SJOSTROM
SWE1.55.5108/08
View Top 26»

16-year-old Ariarne Titmus made the most of the opportunity to snag a minor medal with 3 of last year’s top 8 finishers – Maddie Groves, Tamsin Cook and Bronte Barratt – out of this year’s competition. The Tasmanian teen already shocked the Brisbane audience earlier this meet, stealing the 800m freestyle victory in a World Championship-qualifying time. Now tonight, Titmus rocked a new personal best in this event, taking her morning 1:59.40 even lower to 1:58.11 to represent the only 2 occasions she has dipped under the 2:00 threshold.

A new personal best was also clinched by tonight’s bronze medalist Kotuku Ngawati. Entering these championships, the 22-year-old’s lifetime quickest was the 1:59.77 notched at the 2015 NSW Championships. Tonight she scored her first 1:58 mark, touching just .13 behind Ariarne for the bronze in 1:58.24.

Note that 100m freestyle world record holder Cate Campbell originally claimed the 8th seed in this event, but decided to scratch, giving Kiah Melverton a shot at the final. Melverton moved up a spot to finish 7th in 1:59.73.

WOMEN’S 50 BACKSTROKE- FINAL

29-year-old Rockingham athlete Holly Barratt proved again that age is just a number, earning the first Australian national title of her career. Barratt already qualified for Budapest via her silver medal-garnering 100m backstroke performance last night, but followed that up with a swift 50m backstroke time of 27.60 for gold. That bumps Barratt into the number one spot in the world rankings in this event.

2016-2017 LCM WOMEN 50 BACK

2Yuanhui
FU
CHN27.1507/27
3Aliaksandra
HERASIMENIA
BLR27.2307/27
4Emily
SEEBOHM
AUS27.3707/27
5Kathleen
BAKER
USA27.4807/26
View Top 27»

Brisbane Grammar’s Emily Seebohm was impressive as usual, cranking out a 27.78 for silver. She and Barratt were the only 2 27-point swimmers, with 15-year-old USC Spartans swimmer Kaylee McKeown claiming bronze in 28.11.

MEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE – FINAL

  • Swimming Australia QT –59.75
  • The Podium:
    • Daniel Cave – 1:00.45
    • Matthew Wilson – 1:00.54
    • Tommy Sucipto – 1:00.95

A pair of 18-year-olds finished 1-2 in the sprint breaststroke tonight, led by Melbourne Vicentre’s Daniel Cave. Improving immensely on his 1:01.81 prelims outing, Cave dropped down to 1:00.45 to edge runner-up and 200m breaststroke national champion Matthew Wilson by just .09 of a second.

While Wilson’s personal best rests at the 1:00.23 national age group record he set earlier this year, Cave has never ventured beneath the 1:01 barrier, but did so in a big way with his time tonight. However, with the Aussie-mandated QT sitting at 59.75 and even the FINA A cut at 1:00.35, no one directly qualified for this event individually, although Wilson may be discretionarily selected to race it in Budapest since he is already on the roster.

Rockingham’s Tommy Sucipto, the All Comers Record holder in the short course version of this event, settled for bronze in 1:00.95.

WOMEN’S 50 BUTTERFLY – FINAL

After a quiet 100m freestyle earlier in the meet, Olympic relay gold medalist Brittany Elmslie scored a victory in the 50m butterfly. Touching in 26.48, the 22-year-old Brisbane Grammar athlete scored the win, beating 50m backstroke winner Holly Barratt. Barratt’s back was earlier this session, so the 29-year-old threw down a double and went 2-for-2 in medals.

Bronze tonight went to Commercial’s Sara Saal, the 30-year-old who touched just about a tenth of a second off of her personal best in this event.

 

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39 Comments on "2017 Aussie National C’ships Day 3 Finals Live Recap"

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mannnnnnnnn

53.44 100BK for Rylov in Russian Championships

Apart from Emma Mckeon, the women’s 200m free times were average.

as expected with the absence of a few of the big names. Titmus and Ngawati showed impressive improvements, Neale a bit down on 2016 times, McKeon as usual.

Slow

Australia’s qualifying standards seem counter productive. Especially after the team showing in Rio, shouldn’t they be pushing for MORE international, high-pressure competition? Take anyone who makes the FINA A cut so they get the experience of being at Worlds, and in 2019 they’ll be better equipped to perform.

commonwombat
I’d agree with you IF: 1) they’re just missing these times and/or 2) its the younger swimmers who are finishing 1/2 and swimming PBs in doing so BUT, in all too many cases so far; this hasn;t been the case and a number of these “misses” have not been fractions of seconds but by multiple seconds.Furthermore its those with Olympic experience missing the QTs (W400IM, 100FLY, 200FR, 100BRS, M100FLY) with perhaps M200IM & M100BRS the only cases so far warranting the “pick them for the experience” approach. Hopefully there will be more but overall a large percentage of the Rio ‘carryovers’ still don’t appear to have got back into gear and so far only a handful of juniors are really… Read more »

It does seem that one of the root problems for Aussie swimmers is lack of high quality, high pressure racing to make them race-tough.

In Rio, most winners were those who had raced a lot or too young to have any fear/pressure.

commonwombat
Tradtionally, a major issue has been that AUS is in many ways a prisoner of its own geographic isolation being on opposite seasons to the bulk of the major swimming nations. Furthermore, unlike Europe, N.America & even northern Asia; there are no other really strong swimming nations as neighbours (NZL generally only have maybe a handful of intl class competitors at any given time). This has meant the AUS competitive season completely at odds with the rest of the world with most competition being domestic plsu the odd intl competitor training Down Under. Evan at its strongest point, AUS has never had depth across both programs but rather certain core strengths that vary over time. Another factor HAS been the… Read more »
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About Loretta Race

Loretta Race

Loretta grew up outside Toledo, OH, where she swam age group and high school. Graduating from Xavier University, she stayed in the Cincinnati, OH area and currently resides just outside the city in Northern KY.  Loretta got back into the sport of swimming via Masters and now competes and is …

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