Siobhan Haughey Withdraws from 50 Free Semis with Hip Injury

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

Update: Hong Kong media originally called the injury a back injury, but her coach has confirmed that it is her hip.

Hong Kong swimmer Siobhan Haughey will withdraw from the semifinals of the women’s 50 free on Saturday morning with a hip injury, according to her coach Rick Bishop

Bishop says that she felt a pull in the side of her hip during prelims of the 100 free.

“It bothered her a little in the semi and final, but it’s the Olympic Games, so she kept going.”

Bishop says that the hip was clearly bothering her, and after the 50 free it really hurt her. She swam the prelims of the women’s medley relay “for the team” and then scratched her from semi-finals of the 50 free.

That will conclude her meet. Bishop says he’s not concerned about the injury long-term, but that they’re going to be smart about it with rest and rehab.

Start lists have confirmed the news. Finland’s Fanny Teijonsalo, 25, moves up to take the spot for her first Olympic semi-final.

Haughey finished 15th in prelims in 24.75, while Teijonsalo finished 17th in prelims in 24.79.

Both swimmers are the national record holders in their respective countries, with Haughey having a best of 24.59 from May and Teijonsalo swam a 24.77 at the Mare Nostrum, also in May.

Haughey has already risen to sporting-icon status in Hong Kong with her performance in the 100 and 200 freestyles so far at this meet. She won a silver medal in both the 100 and 200 free. Besides earning her almost $650,000 in medal bonuses directly from the federation, that result will make her hero status in her home country, with further endorsements sure to follow.

Haughey’s 2 Olympic medals are among 3 that Hong Kong has won so far in Tokyo across all sports and represent a third of Hong Kong’s all-time, all sports medals at the Olympic Games. Much as we’ve seen with swimmers like Joseph Schooling in Singapore or Ous Mellouli in Tunisia, medalists from countries that don’t win many Olympic medalists have another level of fame and influence in their home countries, and Haughey has entered that new stratosphere.

The 23-year old Haughey attended college in the United States at the University of Michigan. She continued training there, along with countrymate Jamie Yeung, as a post-grad. She has been home in Hong Kong for most of the pandemic training at the national training center, though Rick Bishop, her primary coach at Michigan, has continued to direct her training from a distance before joining the team for their pre-Olympic training camps.

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mills
1 month ago

It’s likely the $650k in her back pocket that’s throwing off her posture and causing issues 😛

B1Guy!
1 month ago

Nooooo! She’s been having one heck of a meet. Congrats on some stellar performances!

Shadia
1 month ago

oh no 🙁 what a fantastic meet shes had though

BadShoulder
1 month ago

Probably not a huge loss as far as she’s concerned, since her 50 free is relatively weak compared to her 100 and 200.

Coach
1 month ago

Brilliant meet for her. Congratulations, and heal up quickly!

Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

Good on her for swimming the relay though despite the pain.

Oof
1 month ago

I’m guessing it’s not a slipped disk

Ragnar
Reply to  Oof
1 month ago

Could be sciatica, normal comes from weightlifting but the wrong start could’ve just as easily angered the nerve

Jay Ryan
Reply to  Oof
1 month ago

Hopefully not a torn labrum

Boobstroke
1 month ago

52.27 in an Olympic final on a hip injury – which she had for over a day and a half between 100 prelims and finals!! Truly amazing. She’s had a great meet although this isn’t the ideal way to end she has rly performed above and beyond

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Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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