Pro Swim Series – San Antonio: Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2022 TYR PRO SWIM SERIES SAN ANTONIO

SATURDAY FINALS HEAT SHEET

The last Finals Session of the San Antonio Pro Swim Series will feature the 1500 free, 200 IM, 200 back, and the 100 free.

The men’s 200 IM will feature a dual between Tokyo 2020 Olympians Michael Andrew and Leon Marchand. Andrew placed 5th in Tokyo in the 200 IM, but is the #3 all-time American performer in the event (1:55.26) behind Olympic icons Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte.

Not only does that A-Final include Andrew and Marchand, but Shaine Casas, who’s the #4 performer all-time in the 200-yard IM. In addition, Chase Kalisz, the 2017 World Champion in the 200 IM, is also in the mix.

Toyko Olympians Erika Brown and Claire Curzan tied this morning in the 100 freestyle prelims at 54.84. Brown’s 54.1 from the Westmont Pro Series secures her a top-5 spot in the world, but Curzan looks to enter the Global Top 5 tonight in yet another event.

On the men’s side,  Zach Apple is the top seed in the B-Final after losing a swim-off for 8th place earlier this morning. No swimmers in the A-Final broke 49 seconds in prelims, but several high-profile athletes boast personal bests from 46.9-47.9, so we hope to see a few athletes crack into the 48-second barrier before the International Team Trials.

WOMEN’S 1500 FREESTYLE 

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Sierra Schmidt (SAC) – 16:35.94
  2. Jillian Cox (TXLA) – 17:13.12
  3. Abby Grottle (TAMU) – 17:15.92
  4. Frederica Kizek (UN) – 17:30.21
  5. Mollie Wright (TAMU) – 17:35.55
  6. Annabelle Corcoran (UN) – 17:40.56
  7. Ximena Conde Merlos (SASA) – 18:51.56

Sierra Schmidt has great pacing, taking the first 500 meters out in 5:28.8 and bouncing between :32/:33 for the final 1000 meters. She maintained the lead through the entire race, eventually building a lead of over 50 meters. Schmidt blew kisses to the crowd as she finished in 16:35, the 9th-fastest time in the world for 2022.

Jillian Cox also maintained her 2nd-place position throughout the 1500, finishing just off her personal best in 17:13.12

MEN’S 1500 FREESTYLE 

  • World Record: 14:31.02 – Sun Yang (2012)
  • American Record: 14:39.48 – Connor Jaegar (2016)
  • US Open Record: 14:45.54 – Peter Vanderkaay (2008)
  • Jr World Record: 14:46.09 – Franko Grgic (2014)
  • Pro Swim Series Record: 14:53.12 – 14:53.12 – Jordan Wilimovsky (2016)

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Tommy Camblong (UN) – 15:23.33
  2. Marwan Aly Elkamash (ISC) – 15:34.05
  3. Mikey Calvillo (IU) – 15:35.31
  4. Aryan Nehra (UN) – 15:44.67
  5. Ben Cote (UN) – 15:54.73
  6. Advait Page (UN) – 16:02.42
  7. Jackson Carlile (IU) – 16:29.93
  8. Tommy Erwin (AAAA) – 16:37.31

Tommy Camblong led from start-to-finish, winning the 1500 in 15:23.33, good enough for 7th in the world for 2022.

Marwan Aly Elkamash started to make his move at the 600-meter mark and was able to overtake Aryan Nehra by 800 meters in.

Indiana took 2-3 as Elkamash (15:34.05) and Mikey Calvillo (15:35.31) raced home for the finish.

WOMEN’S 200 IM

  • World Record: Katinka Hosszu (HUN, 2015): 2:06.12
  • American Record: Ariana Kukors (USA, 2009): 2:06.15
  • US Open Record: Kathleen Baker (USA, 2018): 2:08.32
  • Junior World Record: Rikako Ikee (JPN, 2017): 2:09.98
  • Pro Swim Record: Katinka Hosszu (HUN, 2015): 2:08.66

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Melanie Margalis (SPA) – 2:12.39
  2. Leah Polonsky (UN) – 2:12.85
  3. Beata Nelson (WA) – 2:13.56
  4. Diana Petkova (BAMA) – 2:16.11
  5. Mackenzie Looze (IU) – 2:18.29
  6. Gabriela Grobler (UN) – 2:19.79
  7. Lindsay Looney (UN) – 2:21.08
  8. Nicole Frank Rodriguez (AZFL) – 2:21.56

Beata Nelson led the way on the fly leg, taking out her 200 IM in 27.8. Margalis was sitting in 3rd at the 100-meter mark, but had a great breaststroke (37.7) leg to put herself within .3 of Nelson. Margalis used her clutch freestyle leg and caught Nelson, very reminiscent of how she closed at the 2016 Olympic Trials to secure a 200 IM spot.

Margalis was just off her season best of 2:12.0, finishing on top with a time of 2:12.39. Leah Polonsky was able to pass Nelson over the final 25 meters, finishing 2nd (2:12.85) and moving up to 7th in the world for 2022.

MEN’S 200 IM

  • World Record: Ryan Lochte (USA, 2011): 1:54.00
  • American Record: Ryan Lochte (USA, 2011): 1:54.00
  • US Open Record: Ryan Lochte (USA, 2011): 1:54.56
  • Junior World Record: Haiyang Qin (CHN, 2017): 1:57.06
  • Pro Swim Record: Michael Phelps (USA, 2012): 1:56.32

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Shaine Casas – 1:56.70
  2. Leon Marchand – 1:56.95
  3. Chase Kalisz – 1:57.10
  4. Michael Andrew – 1:59.11
  5. Sam Stewart – 1:59.44
  6. Jay Litherland – 2:01.44
  7. Joaquin Gonzalez Pinero – 2:02.08
  8. Matheo Mateos – 2:03.31

We knew going into this race that it was going to fast, as the A-Final featured 5 of the 10 top performers for 2022.

Casas was out in 24.59, with Andrew only .02 behind. Casas maintained his lead through the 100, splitting 54.2 compared to Andrew’s 55.1. Casas had a solid breaststroke leg, still continuing to maintain his lead through 150 meters, however Leon Marchand threw down an incredible breaststroke split. That 3rd leg, in addition to his monster underwater kickout, allowed Marchand to pull even with Casas. Casas had to dig deep the last 25, as Marchand and Kalisz were now hot on his tail.

Casas was able to secure the win, obliterating his best time and setting the #1 time in the world for 2022 in 1:56.70. Marchand finished just behind, also setting a new personal best of 1:56.95, which is 2nd in the world. Kalisz overtook Andrew on the last leg to finish 3rd, and 4rd in the world. Andrew finished 4th (1:59.11), dropping nearly a full second from his prelims swim.

WOMEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE

  • World Record: Regan Smith (USA, 2019): 2:03.35
  • American Record: Regan Smith (USA, 2019): 2:03.35
  • US Open Record: Missy Franklin (USA): 2:05.68
  • Junior World Record: Regan Smith (USA, 2019): 2:03.35
  • Pro Swim Record: Regan Smith (USA, 2020): 2:05.94

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Rhyan White (BAMA) – 2:07.92
  2. Phoebe Bacon (UN-01) – 2:09.52
  3. Aviv Barzelay (TAMU) – 2:10.79
  4. Hali Flickinger (SUN) – 2:11.23
  5. Gabby Deloof (CW) – 2:13.16
  6. Barbara Schaal (UN) – 2:17.42
  7. Anna Peplowski (IU) – 2:18.80
  8. Anna Freed (IU) – 2:18.84

Rhyan White took complete control of the race, winning the race in 2:07.92 and moving up to #3 in the world for 2022. The Tokyo Olympians took 1-2, as Phoebe Bacon finished in 2:09.52. Israeli Olympian Aviv Barzelay finished 3rd in a time of 2:10.79: missing her own personal best by .03 seconds.

MEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE

  • World Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA, 2009): 1:51.92
  • American Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA, 2009): 1:51.92
  • US Open Record: Aaron Peirsol (USA, 2009): 1:53.08
  • World Junior Record: Kliment Kolesnikov (RUS, 2017): 1:55.14
  • Pro Swim Record: Xu Jiayu (CHN, 2017): 1:55.04

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Anze Erzen (TAMU) – 2:00.96
  2. Yeziel Morales (AZFL) – 2:03.18
  3. Mikita Tsmyh (UN) – 2:03.77
  4. Joe Radde (IU) – 2:06.70
  5. Jay Baker (ECA) – 2:07.02
  6. Kellen Russell (TAC) – 2:07.63
  7. Mikey Calvillo (IU) – 2:07.94
  8. Tristan Dewitt (IU) – 2:08.29

WOMEN’S 100 FREESTYLE

  • World Record: Sarah Sjostrom (SWE, 2017): 51.71
  • American Record: Simone Manuel (USA, 2019): 52.04
  • US Open Record: Simone Manuel (USA, 2018): 52.54
  • Junior World Record: Penny Oleksiak (CAN, 2016): 52.70
  • Pro Swim Record: Sarah Sjostrom (SWE, 2016): 53.12

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Claire Curzan (TAC) – 53.68
  2. Erika Brown (TNAQ) – 54.08
  3. Natalie Hinds (UN) – 54.30
  4. Katie Ledecky (UN) – 54.93
  5. Mallory Comerford (CARD) – 54.95
  6. Paige Madden (UN) – 54.96
  7. Kelly Pash (TEX) – 55.55
  8. Cloe Stephanek (TAMU) – 55.58

Claire Curzan was out fast, 25.60 to the feet, to be exact. No one was within .3 of her at the 50, and she maintained her lead through the finish. Curzan won the 100 (53.68), with Brown finishing 2nd (54.08) and Hinds 3rd (54.30).

Curzan broke Amanda Weir’s pool record and tied for 3rd in the world with Maddie Wilson (53.68).

MEN’S 100 FREESTYLE

  • World Record: Cesar Cielo Filho (BRA, 2009): 46.91
  • American Record: Caeleb Dressel (USA, 2019): 46.96
  • US Open Record: Ryan Held/Caeleb Dressel (USA, 2019): 47.39
  • Junior World Record: Andrew Minakov (RUS, 2020): 47.57
  • Pro Swim Record: Nathan Adrian (USA, 2016): 48.00

Top 8 finishers:

  1. Caeleb Dressel (GSC) – 49.13 / Andrej Barna (CARD) – 49.13
  2. —-
  3. Ryan Held (NYAC) – 49.20
  4. Drew Kibler (TEX) – 49.30
  5. Maxime Rooney (PLS) – 49.38
  6. Carter Swift (UN) – 49.66 / Aleksey Tarasenko (TENN) – 49.66
  7. —-
  8. Brett Pinfold (SHAC) – 49.80

Barna was out first in 23.3, but Dressel was following close behind with his 23.5 split to the feet. Dressel used Lane 1 as an advantage as he outside-smoked the entire field and tied Barna for the win.

Unfortunately, no one hit the 48-mark, but it was nice to see a tight field with over half the field finishing in 49.3 or under. Ryan Held was able to get his hand on the wall ahead of Kibler and Rooney, who all flipped within hundredths of each other but didn’t have the closing speed that Held had.

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Meathead
4 months ago

Michael Andrew just can’t finish a 200 im. He had the slowest free split in the final. Flashback to him dying in the olympics. Wonder if it’s his training or him not being world class at the event

Yozhik
Reply to  Meathead
4 months ago

How do we call a swimmer who has a problem swimming long distance at high speed he/she is capable of. We call those swimmers a SPRINTER. And we have a plenty of examples of such biological feature. And very often we prioritised such an ability as the most impressive one and the most entertaining to watch.
Then why MA’s difficulties to complete strongly 200m race is treated like a failure?

Last edited 4 months ago by Yozhik
anonymous
Reply to  Meathead
4 months ago

His best time is 1:55.2 regardless of how he swims it that is world class time

Aleks
4 months ago

The jr wr 200 IM is wrong. Hubert Kos went 1.56,99 at europeans 2021, unless it doesn’t count yet due to not being ratified.

Last edited 4 months ago by Aleks
Admin
Reply to  Aleks
4 months ago

FINA still lists Kos’ 1:56.99 as “pending.” Given that it has been pending for 11 months, I’m skeptical that it will ever be ratified.

(This is why FINA’s World Junior Records are a travesty. They should really just stop tracking them).

Yozhik
4 months ago

Never seen Ledecky so hurt by tough training. That was probably the reason of short races selection at this meet. 150m was already too much. She is probably 8:20+ at 800 and 15:50 at 1500 now. For the first time in her career I heard from her during on-deck interview that she is anxious to get some rest next weeks. She is 25 already and should be careful with overloading. Recovery time is much longer now than when she was 15-19. We have already a super star who overtrained (official version) and disappeared completely from the horizon. Nobody knows where she is and what she is doing now and what her prospects are.

Last edited 4 months ago by Yozhik
Cate
4 months ago

These guys are so unknown they should be in the witness protection program,

H2P
Reply to  Cate
4 months ago

If you don’t know Tommy Camblong,
Marwan Aly Elkamash,
Mikey Calvillo, then you just aren’t paying attention and being rude for no reason

Troyy
4 months ago

Only three days until the trials seasons really kicks into gear with British and Canadian trials.

Former Big10
4 months ago

Was hoping for a bit faster in the men’s 100… nothing to say about the 200 back? Lol

Pacific Whirl
4 months ago

Why did you compare the greatest female swimmer in history with mediocre swimmers? It didn’t make sense.

Last edited 4 months ago by Pacific Whirl
Nathan Dragon
Reply to  Pacific Whirl
4 months ago

Because men are much faster than women

Swammer22
Reply to  Pacific Whirl
4 months ago

It’s a pro meet. We expect more than mediocre.

Cate
Reply to  Swammer22
4 months ago

Not if mediocre swimmers are the guys who entered the event.

Swimfan
4 months ago

Anyone knows what Comerford’s best time was in 2017 heading in to US world trials?

Troyy
Reply to  Swimfan
4 months ago

54.40 2017-03-02 2017 Pro Series – Indianapolis
53.91 2017-03-02 2017 Pro Series – Indianapolis <- best time
54.62 2017-04-13 2017 Pro Series – Mesa
54.22 2017-04-13 2017 Pro Series – Mesa
54.95 2017-05-05 2017 Pro Swim – Atlanta
54.59 2017-05-05 2017 Pro Swim – Atlanta
54.47 2017-06-02 2017 IN IU Bucceto Open
54.46 2017-06-02 2017 IN IU Bucceto Open
53.26 2017-06-27 2017 Summer Nationals
52.81 2017-06-27 2017 Summer Nationals <- trials

Former Big10
Reply to  Troyy
4 months ago

She was so “on” for a solid 1.5 years, hoping for a rebound, but USA women are deep. Lotta women fighting for 4-6. Honestly a bit surprised she hasn’t tried a change of scenery.

coach
Reply to  Former Big10
4 months ago

If you want to look at women’s sprint depth, look at Australia.

Last edited 4 months ago by coach
Former Big10
Reply to  coach
4 months ago

Yep, they’re better, especially at the top end. I maybe could have phrased it better, and said, “there will be a lot of women at 53.5-54.0.”

Canswim13
Reply to  Former Big10
4 months ago

Yeah , the US woman aren’t deep in terms of time .. they just have a lot of individuals stuck in the 54 low/53 high range fighting for spots

Gotta get a few of them to 53 flat start to even consider competing with the aussies

So wouldn’t say deep, just clustered