2021 Australian Olympic Trials: Day 3 Finals Live Recap

SWIMMING AUSTRALIA OLYMPIC TRIALS

The third day of competition is underway at the Swimming Australia Olympic and Paralympic trials. Yesterday saw Kaylee McKeown break the world record in the 100 backstroke and Ariarne Titmus coming with .50 seconds of Katie Ledecky‘s world record in the 400 freestyle.

Both swimmers will be competing tonight and earned top seeds at this morning’s preliminary session. McKeown cruised to a 2:13.19 in the 200 IM to lead the field by over a second. With a 2:08.23 from December, she should have a lot more left in the tank tonight. Titmus swam a 1:55.72 in the 200 freestyle to lead all swimmers. The Australian women hold the world record in the 800 freestyle relay and their depth in this event is on full display. It took 1:58.05 to make the finals heat tonight and the top six swimmers were all under 1:57.00 this morning. Emma McKeonwho broke the Australian record in the 100 butterfly on night one, is the third seed at 1:56.52.

If the men’s 400 freestyle from the first day is any indication, the 800 freestyle tonight should be a great race. Jack McLoughlin, the runner up in the 400, is the top seed in the event at 7:42.64. The winner of the 400, Elijah Winnington has scratched, leaving the door open for  Thomas Neill at 7:48.65. Olympic veteran Mack Horton is the fifth seed at 7:52.65. McLoughlin is seeded within four seconds of Grant Hackett‘s Australian record.

Women 200 Meter IM – Finals

  • World Record: 2:06.12 – Katinka Hosszu (HUN), 2015
  • Australian Record: 2:07.03 – Stephanie Rice, 2009
  • Commonwealth Record: 2:06.88 – Siobhan-Marie O’Connor (GBR), 2016
  • World Junior Record: 2:09.64 – Yu Yiting (CHN), 2021
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Katinka Hosszu (HUN) – 2:06.58
  • Olympic Qualifying Time: 2:10.49

Podium:

  1. Kaylee McKeown – 2:08.19
  2. Tessa Wallace – 2:11.79
  3. Meg Bailey – 2:12.88

McKeown, to no surprise, was out to the early lead, turning at the first 50 in 27.71. McKeown extended her lead after backstroke, turning in 1:00.37. Tessa Wallace would move up on the breaststroke leg, turning second behind McKeown with a 50 left. McKeown would finish in 2:08.19 in a personal best time, dropping .04 from her world-leading time from December. Wallace’s time of 2:11.79 is her first time under 2:12 and off the qualifying time for Tokyo. Bailey put up a best time as well, dropping .40 off her previous best of 2:13.28.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

Men 12&O 150 Meter IM MC, SM2-SM4 Finals

Podium:

  1. Ahmed Kelly – 3:00.70
  2. Grant Patterson – 3:06.18

Kelly and “Scooter” Patterson faced off for the second time today as both swimmers are in the same classification. Patterson had early speed in the first 50, touching in 56.99 after the backstroke leg. Kelly moved ahead on breaststroke and opened-up a three second lead heading into the freestyle leg. Kelly would take the win as both swimmers would be under the qualifying time and put themselves into position to qualify for Tokyo.

Women 12&O 200 Meter IM MC, SM5-SM14 – Finals

Podium (by points):

  1. Jasmine Greenwood – 903
  2. Tiffany Thomas Kane – 744
  3. Poppy Wilson – 740

As a contrast to the previous event, the women’s 200 IM multi-class event had swimmers from different classifications. 16-year old Jasmine Greenwood would set the Australian record in the SM10 classification twice today as she swam 2:29.93 this morning then dropped another .10 seconds tonight as she swam 2:29.83.

Men 12&O 200 Meter IM MC, SM5-SM14 – Finals

Podium (by points):

  1. Tim Hodge – 964
  2. Matthew Levy – 896
  3. (tie) Liam Schulter and Jesse Aungles – 856

Tim Hodge, the top finisher this morning, dropped over a second from his prelims swim of 2:17.03 to finish in 2:15.25 and under the qualifying time. Matthew Levy, a 4-time Paralympic qualifier, set an Australian record in the S7 classification this morning with a time of 2:35.99. Levy was a bit slower this evening but achieved a qualifying time in prelims.

Men 200 Meter Butterfly – Finals

  • World Record: 1:50.73 – Kristof Milak (HUN), 2019
  • Australian Record: 1:54.46 – Nick D’Arcy, 2009
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:52.96 – Chad le Clos (RSA), 2012
  • World Junior Record: 1:53.79 – Kristof Milak (HUN), 2017
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1:53.36
  • Olympic Qualifying Time: 1:56.25

Podium:

  1. Matthew Temple – 1:55.25
  2. David Morgan – 1:55.40
  3. Bowen Gough – 1:55.88

Matthew Temple, the top qualifier this morning was out quick in 24.91 in the first 50, well faster than his prelims swim. Bowen Gough moved up the second 50 and touched with the lead at the halfway point. Gough would continue to lead at the 150. The last 50 would turn into a 3-way race with Gough, Temple, and David Morgan moving up on the field. Temple came back to win in a personal best time of 1:55.25 followed by Morgan in 1:55.40 and Gough in 1:55.88. All three swimmers under the OQT; as only two swimmers can make the team in each event, Temple and Morgan will be competing in Tokyo.

Women 200 Meter Freestyle – Finals

  • World Record: 1:52.98 – Federica Pellegrini (ITA), 2009
  • Australian Record: 1:54.27 – Ariarne Titmus, 2019
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:54.27 – Ariarne Titmus, 2019
  • World Junior Record: 1:55.43 – Junxuan Yang (CHN), 2019
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Katie Ledecky (USA) – 1:53.73
  • Olympic Qualifying Time: 1:56.82

Podium:

  1. Ariarne Titmus – 1:53.09
  2. Emma McKeon – 1:54.74
  3. Madison Wilson – 1:55.68
  4. Leah Neale – 1:56.08

Six swimmers in prelims would have made finals at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Aside from individual qualification, there are relay spots at stake tonight. Eyes will be on the battle between Titmus and McKeon.

McKeon was out fast, and built lead of half a body length at the first 50 as she turned in 26.22. McKeon would hold the lead ahead of Titmus at the 100 as she turned in 55.27 with both under world-record pace. Titmus made her move on the third 50, splitting 29.09 to McKeon’s 29.96 to lead at the 150 in 1:24.64. Titmus was battling the WR line with 10 meters left and would finish in 1:53.09 for a new Australian and Commonwealth record and the second fastest time in history. Only Federica Pellegrini from 2009 is faster at 1:52.98.

The top four Australian women combine for a 7:39.59, which is nearly two seconds faster than the current world record in the 800 freestyle relay of 7:41.50 held by Australia. This does not account for relay exchanges and any additional drops that will happen between now and Tokyo.

Titmus split of 28.45 on the final 50 was her second-fastest 50 of the race, out-splitting McKeon by over a second. Titmus’ swim puts her over a second ahead of Katie Ledecky for number one in the world this year. McKeon moves up to fourth in the world rankings.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

 

Men 12&O 50 Back MC, S1-S5 – Finals

Podium:

  1. Grant Patterson – 58.02

Scooter Patterson was in the pool for his second event of the day. Patterson was swimming solo and had the strength of the crowd behind him. His time of 58.02 was a bit slower than his 57.85 from this morning and missed the qualifying time in the event. Patterson is stronger in other events and has already put up two qualifying swims at the meet.

Men 800 Meter Freestyle – Finals

  • World Record: 7:32.12 – Lin Zhang (CHN), 2009
  • Australian Record: 7:38.65 – Grant Hackett, 2005
  • Commonwealth Record: 7:38.65 – Grant Hackett, 2005
  • World Junior Record: 7:45.67 – Mack Horton (AUS), 2013
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: N/A (New Olympic event in 2021)
  • Olympic Qualifying Time: 7:48.12

Podium:

  1. Jack McLoughlin – 7:42.51
  2. Thomas Neil – 7:48.97
  3. Samuel Short – 7:56.81

Through the first 200 it was a race between McLoughlin and Neil as they opened-up a body-length lead on the field. The two would swim together stroke for stroke over the second 200. McLoughlin held the lead at the 400 with a split of 3:50.50 with Neill just behind at 3:50.71. McLoughlin began to pull away over the fifth 100 as he led Neil by over a second at the 500 meter mark. McLoughlin continued to expand his lead over the final 300 meters to finish in 7:42.51, just under his previous best of 7:42.64 from the 2019 World Championships.  Neill, who has already qualified for the 800 freestyle relay, faded over the last 50 to finish second in 7:48.97 and outside of the OQT.

McLoughlin has qualified for his second individual event for Tokyo, after finishing second in the 400 freestyle on Saturday. He ranks second in the world this season in the 800, just behind Gregorio Paltrinieri’s 7:41.96.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

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Oceanian
1 month ago

Splash!

Swimfan
1 month ago

1:53 from titmus this morning i think, with her fast 400 i wouldnt be suprised

Oceanian
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

I’m almost more interested in what the teenagers can do behind(??) the top trio tonight. Hoping both of them can make the team and don’t have a let-down after big PBs in the morning heats.

Last edited 1 month ago by Oceanian
Troyy
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

I suspect Harris was maxed in the prelim but not sure about O’Callaghan.

commonwombat
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

You might be onto something. At Nats, she PB’d sub 54 in the 100 heats but failed to replicate in the final whereas O’Callaghan was sub 54 in both. Will be interesting to observe both in this event and the 100.

Oceanian
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

Speaking of O’Callaghan, I wonder if she and her coach might consider 200IM next season. Guess it might depend on how much she hates swimming breaststroke.

Robbos
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

Looking forward to the 200 free, Titmus v McKeon. Then the relay spots. Exciting stuff.

Stephen
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

McKeown doesn’t seem like she really pushes the back in that medley…..I’m sure there’s .5 of improvement

Texas Tap Water
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

Give me tomorrow’s winning lotto numbers!

Miss M
1 month ago

Great interview with Chris Mooney

Stephen
1 month ago

4am starts are killing me……Thank god these swimmers are making it very enjoyable.

Troyy
Reply to  Stephen
1 month ago

At least it’s only the US prelims in the middle of the night for us. The US finals are at 10am.

M d e
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

Where are you watching them? I’d love to watch.

Troyy
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago
Rob
Reply to  Stephen
1 month ago

2:00 am start time in California, and it’s a work day !! So excited to see the super fast Aussies.

maverick1993
1 month ago

so much easier than trying to find a link for the US trials lol

M d e
1 month ago

That swim was a little disappointing tbh. I thought she would go a 2:07 for sure.

Her BK in her IM isn’t as good as it probably should be. Gotta think she should be closer to WR pace at the 100.

Contrary to the commentators opinion though Kaylees brst is pretty good.

Last edited 1 month ago by M d e
Miss M
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Her breaststroke has improved out of sight in the last 2 years.

M d e
Reply to  Miss M
1 month ago

Yep 100%. It’s not world class breaststroker level, but very, very solid.

She will have one of the better brst legs in the 2IM at Tokyo.

Last edited 1 month ago by M d e
Jamie5678
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

For me, her 400IM PB is the surprise. Very few swimmers can cover 100-400 at world class level and the combination of skills, endurance and speed required to do that would suggest that her 200IM should really be where all those assets comes together.

M d e
Reply to  Jamie5678
1 month ago

Her 400 IM is very good.

Taylor had a lot of potential as a 400 IMer as well, but moved to more full time brst (I assume) due to the weakness in that stroke nationally.

Mooney always has his athletes conditioned well, not afraid of doing some work.

Last edited 1 month ago by M d e
Troyy
Reply to  Jamie5678
1 month ago

Also very close to the WR in the 50 back.

commonwombat
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

To all intents and purposes, this event is currently below her 2 backstroke events on her priorities and one that, to date, she has raced less often ……. and the 400IM very rarely. With that in mind, its understandable there are some areas that can be tidied. WILL these priorities be reassessed post Tokyo ……

Boring name
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

No crossover turn either

Oceanian
1 month ago

Can’t complain about a new PB for Kaylee. She probably lost a few tenths being so close to lhe lane rope for her back leg too. We didn’t expect any others to make the mark, but hopefully the youngsters can improve over the next year or so.

Sapnu puas
1 month ago

God SMOC’s commonwealth record really is unreal. Forever sad how illness has curtailed her career since Rio

Dee
Reply to  Sapnu puas
1 month ago

I was thinking jesus how did Hosszu go 2.06.1, but yep, the Commonwealth record is pretty insane too.