2021 Australian Olympic Trials – Day 4 Finals Live Recap

SWIMMING AUSTRALIA OLYMPIC TRIALS

The fourth day of competition at the Australian Olympic and Paralympic trials is underway in Adelaide. Tonight schedule will feature the finals of the men’s 200 breaststroke, women’s multiclass 100 breaststroke, men’s multiclass 100 breaststroke, women’s 200 butterfly, men’s multiclass 100 freestyle, women’s multiclass 100 freestyle, the men’s 100 freestyle, and the women’s 1500 freestyle.

The men’s 200 breaststroke should be a two-man race between Matthew Wilson and Zac Stubblety-Cook. The two are separated by less than a half-a-second after prelims and are over two seconds faster than the rest of the field. Both swimmers will need to drop around two seconds to meet the qualifying time of 2:08.28.

Elizabeth Dekkers was the only swimmer under 2:10 this morning in the 200 butterfly. Her time of 2:08.49 just missed the qualifying time of 2:08.43. The 17-year old Dekkers swam a 2:07.25 back in April and should be under the qualifying time tonight. The race will be for second as behind Dekkers are Brittany Castelluzzo (2:10.21), Brianna Throssell (2:10.25), and Meg Bailey (2:10.75). Of those three, only Throssell has been under the qualifying time.

Kyle Chalmers leads the field in the men’s 100 freestyle. The gold medalist from 2016 swam a 48.58 this morning, slower than his season best of 48.04 from April. It took 49.16 to qualify for finals and three other swimmers besides Chalmers were under 49 seconds this morning. Chalmers should meet the qualifying time of 48.33 and eyes will be on field to see if a second swimmer can dip below that mark.

The women’s 1500 freestyle should be a good race to watch as four swimmers are seeded under the qualifying time with only two available spots for Tokyo.

The qualifying criteria for Tokyo are not quite as black and white as other countries, but swimmers will need to finish in the top two tonight whilst swimming under the Australian Olympic Qualifying Time (equal to 8th place at the 2019 World Championships) to earn an individual spot. For relay consideration, swimmers need to swim in the A-final of the respective event.

The Multi-Class swimmers do not automatically qualify to the Paralympic Games. Australia has a roster cap of 32 swimmers and can only take 17 men and 15 women to Tokyo.

MEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE – FINAL

Podium:

  1. Zac Stubblety-Cook – 2:06.28
  2. Matthew Wilson – 2:08.52
  3. Daniel Cave – 2:09.62

Wilson was quick off the start and was first to the 25 meter mark. Wilson would continue to hold his lead and turned first at the 50 in 28.85. Zac Stubblety-Cook moved up the second 50 but Wilson remained in front, turning at the 100 mark in 1:01.35, a full second under world-record pace. Stubblety-Cook made his move over the third 50 and took the lead at the 150 mark 1:34.24. Stubblety-Cook would shake the world-record over the last 50, hitting the wall in 2:06.28 for a new Australian and Commonwealth record and second fastest time ever. Only Anton Chupkov’s world record of 2:06.12 has been faster. Wilson finished second in 2:08.52, missing the qualifying time by .24 seconds.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

WOMEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE MC, SB5-SB14 – FINAL

Podium (by points):

  1. Tiffany Thomas Kane – 831
  2. Ashley Van Rijswijk – 815
  3. Kiera Stephens – 792

Swimmers are competing against the qualifying time in their own classification. The goal is to get as close to the world record in their classification as possible. Kiera Stephens (1:18.26) and Tiffany Thomas Kane (1:33.75) both swam under the qualification time in their respective qualification and improved upon their times from this morning.

MEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE MC, SB5-SB14 – FINAL

Podium (by points):

  1. Jake Michel – 1028
  2. Matthew Levy – 835
  3. Timothy Disken – 830

Jake Michel‘s time 1:04.35 set a new Australian record for the SB14 classification and met the qualification time for Tokyo. Joining him with a qualifying swim was Blake Cochrane (SB7) who swam a 1:17.26, a bit faster than his 1:17.55 this morning. Paralympic veterans, Matthew Levy and Rick Pendleton, both seeking to qualify for their fifth games, did not meet their qualifying times.

WOMEN’S 200 BUTTERFLY – FINAL

  • World: 2:01.81 12/10/2009 Liu Zige, CHN
  • Commonwealth: 2:03.41 30/07/2009 Jessicah Schipper, AUS
  • Australian: 2:03.41 30/07/2009 Jessicah Schipper, Commercial
  • All Comer: 2:05.41 7/04/2015 Madeline Groves, SPW
  • OQT: 2:08.43

Podium:

  1. Brianna Throssell – 2:07.63
  2. Elizabeth Dekkers – 2:08.57
  3. Laura Taylor – 2:08.74

There was a group four swimmers together as they approached the first 50 wall with Brianna Throssell in the lead at 28.51 followed closely by Elizabeth Dekkers at 28.56. Dekkers would move up on the second 50, turning at 1:00.72 followed by Throssell in 1:01.09. Dekkers would maintain her lead, turning at at the 150 meter mark in 1:33.62, .23 seconds ahead of Throssell. This is where the veteran Throssell made her move. She would find a second gear on the last 50 to split 33.78 to move ahead of Dekkers and finish in 2:07.63. After falling short in a couple of events this week, Throssell is on her way to her second Olympic games. Dekkers would fade over the last 50 to finish outside the qualifying time.

MEN’S 100 FREE MC, S3-S14 – FINAL

Podium (by points):

  1. Rowan Crothers – 928
  2. Ben Popham – 922
  3. Braedan Jason – 873

Compared to the Olympic events, Paralympians can qualify through swimming a qualification time in a B-Final. Not all classifications have the 100 free but swimmers in those classifications are racing for relay spots. Braedan Jason would set an Australian record in 53.27. Ben Popham met a qualifying time swimming 57.37. Paralympic veteran Matthew Levy, who had yet to swim a qualifying this week, swam a 1:02.55 to meet the qualifying time in his final swim.

WOMEN’S 100 FREE MC, S4-S14 – FINAL

Podium (by points):

  1. Jasmine Greenwood – 868
  2. Natalie Shaw – 816
  3. Ellie Cole – 813

Jasmine Greenwood broke her own Australian record, in 1:02.03 for the S10 qualification. Greenwood set the record this morning in 1:02.36.

MEN’S 100 FREE – FINAL

Podium:

  1. Kyle Chalmers – 47.59
  2. Matthew Temple – 48.32
  3. Cameron McEvoy – 48.49
  4. Zac Incerti – 48.51

Aside from the individual spots in the 100 freestyle, swimmers are vying for relay spots for Tokyo.

Kyle Chalmers showed that he is ready to defend his Olympic title. Still a young man, Chalmers led early on, turning at the 50 mark in 23.05. Chalmers’s long strokes would pull ahead of the field as he would finish nearly a body length ahead of the field in 47.59. Finishing second behind Chalmers was Matthew Temple at 48.32, who dipped under the qualifying time by .01 seconds. Temple’s set a best of 49.01 in prelims and had a cracking swim in finals. Australian record holder Cameron McEvoy finished in third to put his name into contention for a relay spot in Tokyo and his third Olympic games. Finishing fourth was Zac Incerti who broke 49 for the first time in his career.

Chalmers now ranks fourth in the world this season in the 100 free, behind Kliment Kolesnikov’s 47.31.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

WOMEN’S 1500 FREE – FINAL

  • World: 15:20.48 17/05/2018 Katie Ledecky, USA
  • Commonwealth: 15:40.41 04/08/2015 Lauren Boyle, NZL
  • Australian: 15:52.17 04/08/2015 Jessica Ashwood
  • All Comer: 15:28.36 24/04/2014 Katie Ledecky, USA
  • OQT: 16:02.75

Podium:

  1. Maddy Gough – 15:46.13
  2. Kiah Melverton – 15:57.14
  3. Moesha Johnson – 15:59.96

Through the first 200 meters, there was a pack of four women with Maddy Gough leading the way in 2:05.34. Gough extended her lead slightly over the next 300 meters to lead at the 500 meter mark in 5:15.39. Followed by Gough was Kareena Lee in 5:16.82, Moesha Johnson in 5:17.04, and Kiah Melverton in 5:17.34. Gough would assert her lead over the second 500 as the race would be between the trio of Lee, Melverton, and Johnson for the second spot. At the 1000 meter mark, Gough would have a five second lead as she turned at 10:31.26,  Lee fell off the pace as the the race for second was now between Johnson and Melverton. Melverton, who was slightly behind Johnson throughout the race, made her move on the last 100 to finish in second  and qualify for Tokyo. The Australians showed their depth in this event as the top four swimmers were all under the qualifying time.

Maddy Gough put in a dominating swim to break the Australian record in the event by over six seconds. Gough swam a very even race with 500 splits of 5:15.39/5:15.87/5:14.87. This puts her third in the world this season in the women’s 1500 freestyle.

RANKING SEARCH RESULTS

 

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Oceanian
1 month ago

Hoping the pool is extra fast tonight and we can get two reps in each of the five events on the card.

M d e
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

There is only 4 events isn’t there (plus the handful of MC)?

Oceanian
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

5 if u count the M4x100 free lol

Last edited 1 month ago by Oceanian
M d e
1 month ago

Curious to see how Kyle looks tonight. Looked pretty slow (relative to his standards) this morning so will be interested to see where he is at. His 200 was pretty good so no reason to think he can’t be 47-low tonight.

Hopefully Dekkers and Throssel get the job done.

And god I hope Wilson hits the time. I don’t even care if he wins, I will just be so disappointed for him if he places top 2 but misses the time. I think Zac is going 2:06

Joel
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Oh no. Wilson ….

Littlefin
Reply to  Joel
1 month ago

Heartbreaking reaction. I don’t know what’s going on with him – it looks like more than just nerves?

M d e
Reply to  Littlefin
1 month ago

Sometimes you just don’t have it.

He had a bad meet at the worst possible time.

SBOmega
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

he’s not been off for a while. it was curious in may when he put up a heats time but then scratched the 200m in the finals…

Oceanian
1 month ago

I’d also like to see the whole 100m free field take at least 0.5 from their heat swims.

Kris
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

Interested to see if Cartwright can step up

Wenton
Reply to  Kris
1 month ago

He’s been injured for months

Notanyswimmer
1 month ago

King Kyle is the consummate racer in swimming. I think he’ll break the world record in Tokyo and obliterate Dressel (who might not even make Team USA) even if he only goes 48 here.

Troyy
Reply to  Notanyswimmer
1 month ago

You’ve gotta be the most boring troll ever.

Stephen
1 month ago

So no Titmus McKeown McKeon or.Campbell this morning………what can the Aussies produce

Oceanian
Reply to  Stephen
1 month ago

Perhaps a King instead of those Queens

M d e
Reply to  Stephen
1 month ago

Zac lighting it up.

What an animal.

Jackman
1 month ago

I need Matt Wilson to make this team.

Jackman
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

and misses it by essentially the same margin. Surely the selectors can use some discretion for the former WR holder.

Oceanian
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

If he had been 2nd in the 100 he would rated a much better chance

M d e
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

Given he has the best 100 PB and is former WR and placed 2nd in the 200 it wouldn’t be the most out there decision. It makes sense to me to an extent.

But this might just be wishful thinking.

commonwombat
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

His 200 time IS a FINA A so that is certainly in his favour. His time DOES stand up OK internationally. Do, however, agree that finishing 2nd in the 100 would’ve strengthened his case exponentially.

Auzzie
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

Not sure that the 2nd qualifier in the 100 breast made the Fina A time? Maybe Wilson is a possibility as he made the Fina time?

Auzzie
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

Dependent on how many spare spots they have for relay only swimmers once the dust settles.

Drama King
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Does he has the A standard in 100.

M d e
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

I am near certain he has hit the A standard in both the 100 and 200.

commonwombat
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

S-Cook was the only one to make the FINA A in the 100.

M d e
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

I meant his best time sorry, not at this meet. Was slow at this meet.

commonwombat
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Best time of 59.17 at 2019 Worlds which IS within qualifying period under FINA rules. I can certainly agree that there IS a case to be made for his inclusion, as for Cooper & Dekkers. Team numbers (and relay considerations) may/may not go in their favour(s).

Kris
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

I would like to see some discretion applied

Oceanian
1 month ago

Soooooooo close to the WR!!!!!

Jackman
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

Perfect swim from Zac

M d e
1 month ago

I feel so bad for Matt Wilson, but Zac absolutely smashed him.

Zac might go 2:05 in Tokyo.

nuotofan
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Stubblety-Cook at WR level was my hope, since Worlds 2019. A great sign also for breaststroke itself: it doesn’t need to be super-powerful to excel.

Last edited 1 month ago by nuotofan
M d e
Reply to  nuotofan
1 month ago

Zac is incredible, brilliant technically and very efficient. He had to spend a lot of his career, even as an age grouper, in Wilson’s shadow, so it’s good to see him break out over the last few years.

But I feel so bad for Wilson.

Robbos
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Great comment M d e.

nuotofan
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

The nightmare in Olympic years continues for Wilson. What happened in this season is incredible considering how fast was Matthew Wilson two years ago and all the improvements made since 2017.