2020 Women’s Ivy League Championships: Up/Mid/Downs Day 3

2020 Women’s Ivy League Championships

  • Wednesday, February 19 – Saturday, February 22
  • Katherine Moran Coleman Aquatics Center – Providence, RI (Eastern Time Zone)
  • Prelims: 11:00 AM/Finals: 6:00 PM
  • Defending Champion: Harvard (2x – results)
  • Live results
  • Fan Guide
  • Championship Central

For those unfamiliar with swimming terminology, the concept of “Ups” and “Downs” is a good way to track which teams performed best at prelims. In prelims, swimmers qualify for one of three finals heats: the top 8 finishers make the A final, places 9 through 16 the B final and places 17 through 24 the C final. In finals, swimmers are locked into their respective final, meaning a swimmer in the B heat (spots 9-16) can only place as high as 9th or as low as 16th, even if they put up the fastest or slowest time of any heat in the final.

With that in mind, we’ll be tracking “Ups,” “Mids” and “Downs” after each prelims session. “Up” refers to swimmers in the A final, “Mid” to swimmers in the B final and “Down” to swimmers in the C final.

Harvard swept the top qualifying spots in all 5 individual events on Friday morning. Freshman Felicia Pasadyn, who won the 200 IM on Thursday, posted the top time in the 400 IM with 4:11.71. Senior Miki Dahlke clocked a field-leading 52.71 in the 100 fly. Junior Kennedy Quist and defending champion Samantha Shelton qualified 1-2 in the 200 free with 1:46.06 and 1:46.71, respectively. Junior Jaycee Yegher took down the Brown pool record in the 100 breast, qualifying first with 59.39. And freshman Addie Rose Bullock touched in 53.74 to lead the field in the 100 back.

Princeton and Brown each placed 18 swimmers in the various finals. Princeton led the morning overall with 10 A finalists, 6 B finalists, and 2 C finalists. Although the 1000 is not included in the tables below, it is worth mentioning that the Tigers have three of the top 8 seeds. They will be swimming in the fastest heat in tonight’s finals session. Harvard’s top entrant, seeded 14th, will compete in the afternoon heats. Princeton is projected to take the lead from Harvard in tonight’s final and set up a showdown for Day 4.

Columbia, Brown, and Penn, separated only by 6 points at the conclusion of Day 2 finals, are locked in a tight battle for 4th through 6th. Brown and Penn came out on top this morning and have pulled ahead of Penn, but the race for 4th is still intense.

Dartmouth had a stellar morning, beating their psych sheet seedings by 49 points.

Women’s Ups/Downs – Day 3

Does not include 1000 free or 400 medley relay

Team Up Mid Down Total
Brown 3 8 7 18
Columbia 6 1 5 12
Cornell 0 5 6 11
Dartmouth 2 3 7 12
Harvard 9 4 3 16
Penn 3 6 6 15
Princeton 10 6 2 18
Yale 7 7 2 16

400 IM

Up Mid Down Total
Brown 1 2 1 4
Columbia 2 0 0 2
Cornell 0 1 0 1
Dartmouth 0 0 3 3
Harvard 2 2 1 5
Penn 0 1 1 2
Princeton 2 1 0 3
Yale 1 1 0 2

100 fly

Up Mid Down Total
Brown 1 1 1 3
Columbia 0 0 1 1
Cornell 0 1 1 2
Dartmouth 0 0 1 1
Harvard 2 0 1 3
Penn 1 3 0 4
Princeton 3 1 1 5
Yale 1 2 2 5

200 free

Up Mid Down Total
Brown 0 2 1 3
Columbia 1 1 2 4
Cornell 0 2 2 4
Dartmouth 2 0 2 4
Harvard 2 0 0 2
Penn 0 1 0 1
Princeton 3 0 1 4
Yale 0 2 0 2

100 breast

Up Mid Down Total
Brown 0 1 2 3
Columbia 2 0 1 3
Cornell 0 1 1 2
Dartmouth 0 1 0 1
Harvard 1 0 1 2
Penn 1 1 3 5
Princeton 1 3 0 4
Yale 3 1 0 4

100 back

Up Mid Down Total
Brown 1 2 2 5
Columbia 1 0 1 2
Cornell 0 0 2 2
Dartmouth 0 2 1 3
Harvard 2 2 0 4
Penn 1 0 2 3
Princeton 1 1 0 2
Yale 2 1 0 3

 

Team Scores After Day 2

  1. Harvard 510
  2. Princeton 508
  3. Yale 352.5
  4. Columbia 287
  5. Brown 284
  6. Penn 281
  7. Dartmouth 248
  8. Cornell 219.5

Projected Standings

DOES include 1000 free and 400 medley relay, by seed

Team Day 2 Standings Day 3 Prelims Day 4 Psych Final Projected Standings
Brown 284 289.5 250 840.5
Columbia 287 232 176 720
Cornell 219.5 135 155 532.5
Dartmouth 248 163 177 602
Harvard 510 398 507 1448
Penn 281 229 272 866
Princeton 508 429 607 1645
Yale 352.5 345.5 441 1204

 

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DOWN ON UP-DOWN

I have never liked the “Up Mid Down” classification. For one thing, some swimmers are thrilled just to make it back at night, score some points, so a “B Final” or “C Final” gets that done. “C Final” is not always a “Down” result. For another thing, most of the time it gets used, the author feels the need to explain what it means just in case someone is “unfamiliar”. If you always have to explain it, maybe that’s a sign. An easy way to describe how many swimmers made “A Finals” and “B Finals” and “C Finals” would be … wait for it: “A” “B” “C”. This article does a great job of giving the perfunctory explanation, then going… Read more »

96Swim

Every time I see the up/down thing I think it will be a comparison to seeds with some sort of analysis of whether a given team outperformed their seeds.

Down

This is a sport, the c final does not score and provides nothing to the team. It is classified as down for a reason. I’m sorry if you feel as if this is too hard for your soft mind.

LOL

Haha haha! DOWN, maybe you should think or read before you type and are rude to someone. C final scores at this championship meet – they do matter and they do contribute.

Konner Scott

We used this terminology on my high school and college teams back in the day before I ever saw it on SwimSwam.

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swim/swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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