Carson Foster Delves into 400 IM Pain, World #1 Swim with 4:08.46

In the SwimSwam Podcast dive deeper into the sport you love with insider conversations about swimming. Hosted by Coleman HodgesGarrett McCaffrey, and Gold Medal Mel Stewart, SwimSwam welcomes both the biggest names in swimming that you already know, and rising stars that you need to get to know, as we break down the past, present, and future of aquatic sports.

We sat down with Carson Foster, the 19-year-old who just put up the #1 time in the world in the 400 IM from Austin, Texas. Foster breaks down what went right in his swim, what didn’t go so right in his finals swim at the 2021 Olympic Trials, and what he thought when watching the 400 IM Olympic final. Foster gives a lot of insight into what the men in that 400 IM final went through to get to the top 8 and why the times may not have accurately portrayed the effort being put out.
Foster also provides insight into the work he’s been doing since coming back to Austin from the Olympic Trials, including 10×100 (suited) on 1:10 best average, where he held 57s, the time he would want to come home in at the end of a 400 IM. Foster says getting the feeling of that ‘400 IM pain’ on numbers 5,6,7,8 gave him confidence heading into the sectional meet this weekend.

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Coach Rob
1 month ago

Pain.

Sophie
1 month ago

Happy to see that he’s not too upset from his Trials performance, and he’s just letting all of this motivate him further. More great things to come from Carson Foster in the near future!

TeamLedecky
1 month ago

Would’ve won Olympic gold, wish the US would maybe use a different system on electing swimmers to team

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

You can’t say that. He would have had a chance of course but he had to learn the lesson he talked about in the video. Imagine if he had a striaght pass to the Olympics he might have just made the same mistake and blown up on the last 50.

I would like to see 3 per country or wildcards for world ranked top 16 swimmers but that is another conversation.

M d e
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
1 month ago

I think world champs should have wildcard entries, or even QTs plus allowances for smaller/weaker nations to enter swimmers.

I’m one with 2 per nation for olympics, but I want to see the best X swimmers in the world at World Champs, even if half are American.

Marmot
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

He’s got a bit of a history with underperforming under big pressure. He’ll learn from this. There’s no evidence saying he’d go the 4:08 at the Olympics. Most of his splits were close to his Trials splits, except freestyle, where he crumbled after Chase’s breaststroke split

LBSWIM
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

No. He probably wouldn’t have made finals. Then again we will never know. But we do know USA won gold and silver with two men who could handle the pressure when it counted.

Scotty P
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

Yooooo, although we mutually feel bad for the kid (myself being from Ohio so you know…..) part of swimming is winning the race itself and getting it done on race day. He didn’t get it done at trials.

………..He’ll be back though.

crispr ai
Reply to  Scotty P
1 month ago

did u just drop a 3:42 in your local 400 free or something? how u gonna call him a kid? i get that he’s young but you just appear insecure in trying to assert an authoritative tone and i think it’s ugly.

Doconc
Reply to  crispr ai
1 month ago

Oh cMon. Lighten up

LBSWIM
Reply to  crispr ai
1 month ago

Lighten up, kid.

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  crispr ai
1 month ago

Pot meet kettle.

PenguinMan
Reply to  crispr ai
1 month ago

wtf dude🤨

Yup
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

still wouldn’t matter if he doesn’t go 4:08 until AFTER the team is selected……

Not Tapered 🏊
Reply to  Yup
1 month ago

Doesn’t matter for the Olympics in 2021, but is something to build off of. If the kid would have gone a 4:10 we wouldn’t be talking about that swim, but he threw down the fastest time in the world. I’m guessing that’s exactly one more time than 99% of all swimmers and comment experts.

Dudeman
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

Being able to cruise in the morning is a massive advantage, in the Olympic environment, having to go 4:09-4:10 to make it back I don’t think he would’ve gone 4:08. It’s a great swim and a painful “what if” but we’ve seen how he swims when he goes 4:10 in the morning and then races again 12 hours later. He will have his time soon enough

Charge
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

I think Carson realizes his 408 isn’t quite equitable since he didn’t have to work hard 14 hours earlier in a prelim swim

He actually states that in the interview

Good for the kid, this is what I was hoping he would take away from this experience, he is a very real shot at being thick of things in 2024 in 2028

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  TeamLedecky
1 month ago

Let’s see him do a 4:08 after doing a 4:09 in prelims. He faltered at NCAAs and Trials in the finals. He just needs experience.

The unoriginal Tim
1 month ago

Carson Foster seems like a really nice guy. Always interesting to hear what top level swimmers think about thier swims.

Tomek
1 month ago

Wishing you all the best Carson Foster!

James Bogen
1 month ago

I think this shows how focused he was on learning from his OT experience. Among other things it also looks like he swam this race smarter. There are more great things on the way for him. Great job & keep it up!

James Bogen
Reply to  James Bogen
1 month ago

He also shows a lot of maturity and a great perspective in this interview. He expressly said he’s not thinking he should’ve been there winning the Olympic final (he gave a well-reasoned explanation of how the times possibly ended up the way they did without trying to make himself look good), and he was pumped for Kalisz and Litherland going 1-2.

Hswimmer
1 month ago

I really do think they should have 3 per country.. track does it why can’t swimming?

Alo
Reply to  Hswimmer
1 month ago

I believe they changed the rule after the 1976 Olympics, where the US men won all but one event (2BR) and went 1-2 in 9/11 and 1-2-3 in 5/11 individual events. Something about parity in the sport?

Edit: They first let only 2 compete from each nation at the 1984 games. The 1980 Moscow games (boycott) showed the USSR in a similar 1-2-3 podium sweep position.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alo
Gogo bibi
1 month ago

Alright , let me say it one more time :
TOKYO O.G -> MORNING FINALS , PRESSURE, FIERCE COMPETITORS

All the swimmers have to passe
these barriers to perform well. Chalisz did the job no matter who went faster than him outside of Tokyo. Fostah couldn’t handle OT’s pressure, He will be a lot more dangerous in 3 years.

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