Northwestern Picks Up Verbal from Colorado 4A Champion Ryan King

Ryan King of the Montrose Marlins Swim Club in Colorado has verbally committed to the Northwestern Wildcats. He will be part of new head coach Jeremy Kipp and staff’s first recruiting class, which already consists of Marcus Mok of Hong Kong and Ethan Churilla of Indiana on the men’s side.

I want to first thank everyone who has gotten me this far in my swimming and academic career: my coach, my family, my friends and all the coaches I’ve talked to throughout the process. And secondly, I am proud to announce my verbal commitment to swim and study at Northwestern University! Go ‘Cats!

King specializes in distance freestyle, and he was the 500 free champion at the 2018 Colorado 4A Championships, where he also placed 4th in the 200 free representing Montrose High School.

TOP TIMES

  • 200y free – 1:41.71
  • 500y free – 4:29.53
  • 1650y free – 15:22.33
  • 800m free – 8:17.29
  • 1500m free – 15:54.55

Northwestern recently had huge success in distance free with the development of Jordan Wilimovsky, an NCAA All-American, Rio Olympian, and 2018 U.S. Nationals champion in the 1500 free.

King’s best time in the mile would’ve scored 17th at the 2018 Big Ten Champs, right behind his future teammate DJ Hwang (15:16.73), who was 16th.

If you have a commitment to report, please send an email with a photo (landscape, or horizontal, looks best) and a quote to [email protected].

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Anonymous
3 years ago

Too bad Jordan’s coach (a really really great guy) was fired.

Dan
Reply to  Anonymous
3 years ago

Too bad this comment is really really random

Jim Nickell
3 years ago

This is GREAT – Have fun Ryan – have fun Liam!

szk
3 years ago

Can’t wait to see what Northwestern will be able to do in the coming years! Go ‘Cats!

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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