Santi Corredor Returns to Transfer Portal, Looks to Transfer to South Carolina

Santi Corredor is in the NCAA transfer portal after a season with the Florida State Seminoles. Corredor went to high school in Florida and is a dual citizen in the United States and Colombia.

Corredor began his career at the University of Florida in his home state, then transferred to the University of Southern California for his junior season (the 2019-20 season). He didn’t compete with USC, though, then left the school due to “financial complications.” He hopes to transfer to South Carolina, which would be his fourth school.

He’s outlined his situation in a petition to the NCAA in hopes he can transfer and not have to sit out a season, which includes his claim that his transfer is for mental health reasons due to his experiences at FSU.

“South Carolina is the only school I would swim for. From personal experience as a swimmer under them, Jeff Poppell and Robert Pinter are two outstanding coaches with great team culture values. I would love the chance to have Coach Poppell as my head honcho.”

TOP TIMES (SCY)

  • 200 free – 1:37.06
  • 500 free – 4:18.57
  • 1650 free – 15:19.74
  • 200 back – 1:45.08
  • 200 fly – 1:45.45
  • 200 IM – 1:47.63
  • 400 IM – 3:44.85

Corredor has represented his home nation of Colombia internationally; he raced at the 2019 Pan American Games, placing eighth in the 400 free and 400 IM. In yards, his lifetime bests in the freestyle events, and the 200 back and 400 IM, are all from 2018 while he was a freshman at Florida. He hit a 200 fly PR earlier in 2021 with FSU, while his 200 IM PR is from high school. He scored in the 500 free B-final and 200 fly C-final at the 2021 ACC Championships with the Seminoles.

Jeff Poppell was the Florida women’s head coach while Corredor was with the Gators, and Poppell’s currently taking over the South Carolina program as the Florida program is combining genders under Anthony Nesty.

As the Gamecocks rebuild under Poppell’s new direction, Corredor would be a big get for the Gamecocks, who had nobody under 4:20 in the 500 free this past season; in fact, he would’ve been their best swimmer in all of the events on his top times list except for the 200 free.

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distance swimmer, not by choice
1 month ago

at some point its you dawg

Yaboi
1 month ago

Transferring that many times has got to take a toll on someone

JeahBrah
1 month ago

Yet another report of a toxic culture/coach… this seems way more prevalent than I would have imagined. How do these people rise to division 1 coaching roles?

Common sense
Reply to  JeahBrah
1 month ago

It’s different than a program like auburn that had a ton of transfers… if it’s one guy he’s probably the problem not the coaches

Move Fishhh get out the way
Reply to  Common sense
1 month ago

There are 6 people in the transfer portal leaving FSU. Several for mental health reasons…

Anonymous
Reply to  JeahBrah
1 month ago

You fail to realize that this is this swimmers 3rd transfer in as many years

Faster_Than_Uzbek_Scoreboard
Reply to  JeahBrah
1 month ago

Is that a toxic culture at USC or FSU?

watergirl2
Reply to  Faster_Than_Uzbek_Scoreboard
1 month ago

from what I’ve heard from others swimming there ive heard both are pretty bad

Anonymous
Reply to  JeahBrah
1 month ago

From experience the UF coach/culture is very overrated and it’s an overall bad time. Fsu has terrible coaches and south californi was too expensive. Like you mention, this toxic issue is more prevalent than people imagine.

MickeyMouse
Reply to  Anonymous
1 month ago

I’d love to see an anonymous survey done across the Power 5 teams and beyond and see how many swimmers are truly happy where they are.

Anonymom
Reply to  MickeyMouse
1 month ago

I can tell you that my swimmer, at FSU, couldn’t be happier. Swimming fast, on the Deans list, loves the coaches, and truly enjoying the great team culture.

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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