Santi Corredor Returns to Transfer Portal, Looks to Transfer to South Carolina

Santi Corredor is in the NCAA transfer portal after a season with the Florida State Seminoles. Corredor went to high school in Florida and is a dual citizen in the United States and Colombia.

Corredor began his career at the University of Florida in his home state, then transferred to the University of Southern California for his junior season (the 2019-20 season). He didn’t compete with USC, though, then left the school due to “financial complications.” He hopes to transfer to South Carolina, which would be his fourth school.

He’s outlined his situation in a petition to the NCAA in hopes he can transfer and not have to sit out a season, which includes his claim that his transfer is for mental health reasons due to his experiences at FSU.

“South Carolina is the only school I would swim for. From personal experience as a swimmer under them, Jeff Poppell and Robert Pinter are two outstanding coaches with great team culture values. I would love the chance to have Coach Poppell as my head honcho.”

TOP TIMES (SCY)

  • 200 free – 1:37.06
  • 500 free – 4:18.57
  • 1650 free – 15:19.74
  • 200 back – 1:45.08
  • 200 fly – 1:45.45
  • 200 IM – 1:47.63
  • 400 IM – 3:44.85

Corredor has represented his home nation of Colombia internationally; he raced at the 2019 Pan American Games, placing eighth in the 400 free and 400 IM. In yards, his lifetime bests in the freestyle events, and the 200 back and 400 IM, are all from 2018 while he was a freshman at Florida. He hit a 200 fly PR earlier in 2021 with FSU, while his 200 IM PR is from high school. He scored in the 500 free B-final and 200 fly C-final at the 2021 ACC Championships with the Seminoles.

Jeff Poppell was the Florida women’s head coach while Corredor was with the Gators, and Poppell’s currently taking over the South Carolina program as the Florida program is combining genders under Anthony Nesty.

As the Gamecocks rebuild under Poppell’s new direction, Corredor would be a big get for the Gamecocks, who had nobody under 4:20 in the 500 free this past season; in fact, he would’ve been their best swimmer in all of the events on his top times list except for the 200 free.

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distance swimmer, not by choice
4 months ago

at some point its you dawg

Yaboi
4 months ago

Transferring that many times has got to take a toll on someone

JeahBrah
4 months ago

Yet another report of a toxic culture/coach… this seems way more prevalent than I would have imagined. How do these people rise to division 1 coaching roles?

Common sense
Reply to  JeahBrah
4 months ago

It’s different than a program like auburn that had a ton of transfers… if it’s one guy he’s probably the problem not the coaches

Move Fishhh get out the way
Reply to  Common sense
4 months ago

There are 6 people in the transfer portal leaving FSU. Several for mental health reasons…

Anonymous
Reply to  JeahBrah
4 months ago

You fail to realize that this is this swimmers 3rd transfer in as many years

Faster_Than_Uzbek_Scoreboard
Reply to  JeahBrah
4 months ago

Is that a toxic culture at USC or FSU?

watergirl2
Reply to  Faster_Than_Uzbek_Scoreboard
4 months ago

from what I’ve heard from others swimming there ive heard both are pretty bad

Anonymous
Reply to  JeahBrah
4 months ago

From experience the UF coach/culture is very overrated and it’s an overall bad time. Fsu has terrible coaches and south californi was too expensive. Like you mention, this toxic issue is more prevalent than people imagine.

MickeyMouse
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

I’d love to see an anonymous survey done across the Power 5 teams and beyond and see how many swimmers are truly happy where they are.

Anonymom
Reply to  MickeyMouse
4 months ago

I can tell you that my swimmer, at FSU, couldn’t be happier. Swimming fast, on the Deans list, loves the coaches, and truly enjoying the great team culture.

Jim
4 months ago

No good reason for the NCAA to deny this. Let the man swim

swimapologist
Reply to  Jim
4 months ago

No good reason? Wait until NIL is passed. You’re going to see athletes in football/basketball hopping schools every year if there’s no check on it.

I agree – give someone one freebie. By the second one, it seems like there oughta be some kind of a cooling-off period.

samulih
Reply to  swimapologist
4 months ago

coaches can leave whenever they like, so no.

Jim
Reply to  swimapologist
4 months ago

But ultimately why shouldn’t they be able to hop around however they want? I personally wouldn’t want to but if that’s what an athlete wants to do/how they can best make a living they should be allowed to

Swimmer9905
4 months ago

Santi Corredor is a stand up dude. Hard worker and always a pleasure to be around. Hopefully everything works out for him and he ends up at South Carolina with a good coaching situation via Jeff Poppell.

Hswimmer
Reply to  Swimmer9905
4 months ago

Then why is this his 4th school? That’s ridiculous no matter what kind of person you are.

CACrushers
Reply to  Hswimmer
4 months ago

It might not be as bad as you think if he left SoCal because of financial reasons and then Jeff Poppell comes out and says he has scholarship money that was left on the table…

Anonymous
4 months ago

Just another batch of FSU swimmers entering the transfer portal. Turning into an annual tradition.

Anon
4 months ago

Ok cool but it’s probably time to look in the mirror at this point

Last edited 4 months ago by Anon
Anonymous
Reply to  Anon
4 months ago

Time to look in the mirror from which side of the story? Obviously something is up with the swimmer that’s made him transfer this many times. The atmosphere at florida state is a very stressful one coming from a swimmer at the program. The fact that they recruit 20-30 swimmers a year doesn’t help that. The yearly cuts at the infamous garnet and gold meet just add onto the stress the swimmers face on the daily.

Personally I liked the coaching staff, however the one of the coaches Dan Kessler seems to be a great guy and I love him for being the chef he is, he has a very biased opinion towards different swimmers on the team based… Read more »

Anonymous
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

Dan Kesler cares about all his swimmers. I’m sorry but when you have a swimmer in general who doesn’t care whatsoever it’s not the coaches job to get them to care. Swimmers choose this lifestyle for a reason because they love to swim and compete at the highest level possible. It only seems fair that you would cut swimmers who don’t care and just wanna be part of the team. When it comes to college sports, their are no participation ribbons. And to top it all off, the people that transfer are the toxic swimmers just making up excuses and blaming the coaches for not improving when in reality it’s on the swimmer itself.

If you can't handle the heat, get out of the oven.
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

Get this Dan Kesler slander out of here. I was a low-profile swimmer at ASU who faced cuts as well so I understand that situation is stressful, but that’s what you get when you sign up for a power 5 program. Dan has high expectations about attitude and work ethic and is straightforward in communicating when you fall short of those expectations, which not everyone can handle. Your poor experience with him was likely a reflection of your own attitude. He was the most impactful coach I had in my swimming career – both in and out of the pool. My only gripe with Dan was that he put too much onion on one of the pizzas he made for… Read more »

swimfast
4 months ago

Santo Condorelli: switches nationalities; lives in US, is from Canada, then becomes Italian

Santi Corredor: transfers 3 times

Roch
Reply to  swimfast
4 months ago

Not gonna lie, when I first saw the headline my brain misread it as Santo Condorelli and I thought “oh I didn’t know they had a transfer portal for international representation” 😂

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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