Looking Back at Day 4 of the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials

It’s June 24th, and today was originally supposed to be Day 4 of the 2020 US Olympic Trials. Although the Tokyo Olympics have been postponed to 2021, we still want to honor the would-have-been Day 4 of the 2020 Olympic Trials, by reliving Day 4 of the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Trials. So without further ado, let’s go back and remember what was going on during the 4th day of the Olympic Trials back in 2012 and 2016.

2016

PHELPS QUALIFIES FOR 5th OLYMPIC TEAM, SCRATCHES 100 FREE

After scratching out of prelims of the 200 free on Day 2, Michael Phelps scratched out of the 100 free prelims on Day 4 as well. Phelps was the 2nd seed behind only Nathan Adrian, giving him what we thought was a good chance at earning a spot in the individual 100 free, and certainly a great chance at making the 400 free relay. Despite the scratches in the 100 and 200 free, Phelps could still be named to the 400 and 800 free relays by head men’s Olympic coach Bob Bowman. Notably, Michael Phelps‘ freestyle hadn’t looked quite the same since coming back after his 2012 retirement.

Michael Phelps pulled off an incredibly rare feat in finals of the 200 fly on Day 4. The G.O.A.T. won the men’s 200 fly to qualify for his 5th Olympic Team, making him only the 14 swimmer in history to ever make 5 Olympics. Additionally, only 384 athletes had ever made 5 Olympics in the history of the modern Olympics.

LOCHTE CONTINUES TO HAVE A ROCKY MEET

After missing qualifying for the Olympic Team in both the 400 IM and individual 200 free, veteran Olympic superstar Ryan Lochte will be missing out on the 100 free as well, after scratching out of semi-finals of the men’s 100 free on Day 4. Lochte put up a decent performance in prelims, taking 6th with a 49.13. Although he could still be named to the 400 free relay by Bob Bowman, it seems likely there will enough swimmers faster than his 49.13 that they will merit the relay spots. Ryan Lochte at the time was the 7th-fastest American 100 freestyler in history with his personal best 48.16.

With this scratch, Lochte now has the 200 back, 200 IM, and 100 fly left on his schedule for this meet.

MISSY FRANKLIN BOUNCES BACK IN 200 FREE

After a rough start to these Trials with a disappointing 100 back, 2012 Olympic superstar Missy Franklin bounced back in finals of the 200 free, taking the 2nd spot to punch her ticket to Rio. Franklin swam a smart racing, turning in 4th at the 100 meter mark, and surging past Simone Manuel and Allison Schmitt on the back half. Franklin swam a 1:56.18, finishing 2nd behind Katie Ledecky, who won the race in 1:54.88.

With the swim, Franklin will be representing the Stars and Stripes in Rio in the 200 free, as well as the 800 free relay. Back at the 2012 Olympics in London, Franklin placed 4th in the 200 free, and earned Gold in the 800 free relay.

MAYA DIRADO QUALIFIES IN SECOND EVENT

Versatile Stanford grad Maya DiRado picked up her 2nd Rio qualification by winning the women’s 200 IM on Day 4. DiRado was also the 400 IM champion, and will be going on to represent the US in both IMs in Rio. She was the only swimmer in the women’s 200 IM final to crack the 2:10 barrier. DiRado swam a 2:09.54, just off the U.S. Nationals Record of 2:09.34.

Melanie Margalis came in 2nd after a tight race with Caitlin Leverenz.

2016 OLYMPIC TEAM QUALIFIERS DAY 4

2012

ALLISON SCHMITT CRUSHES AMERICAN RECORD IN 200 FREE

Much like she did in the 400 free, Allison Schmitt took the 200 free out hard, only this time, she didn’t fade down the stretch. Schmitt posted a blistering 1:54.40 to crack the American Record, which stood at 1:54.96. She was out in a blistering 55.61 on the first 100, taking the lead and holding it through the entire race. Schmitt is now up to 3 events for London, where she’ll be competing in the 400 free, 200 free, and the 800 free relay.

Allison Schmitt is now the 2nd-fastest 200 freestyler in history heading into London.

TARWATER OUT AGAIN, PHELPS TAKES 200 FLY

It was another heart-breaker for Davis Tarwater, and it looked so promising early on. Tarwater was out with unbelievable speed, splitting 53.66 on the first 100. Michael Phelps took over the lead at the 150 mark, but Tarwater was still holding on to that Olympic qualifying spot. Unfortunately, Tarwater faded on the last 50 of the race, finishing in 4th. It was Tyler Clary who ended up charging late and taking the 2nd Olympic roster spot in the event.

Michael Phelps made the Olympic roster again, winning his signature event – the 200 fly. He swam a 1:53.65, a time which nobody other than Phelps has been faster than in textile.

FIRST-TIME OLYMPIANS REPRESENTING U.S. IN WOMEN’S 200 IM

A pair of first-time Olympians punched their tickets to London in the women’s 200 IM. Caitlin Leverenz, who made her first Olympic roster on Day 1 in the 400 IM, won the women’s 200 IM on Day 4 with a 2:10.22. 200 IM World Record holder Ariana Kukors came in 2nd in the event, swimming a 2:11.30. Kukors holds the World Record at 2:06.15, which she swam back at the 2009 World Championships in Rome. Despite being the fastest women’s 200 IM’er in history, Kukors has just now qualified for her first Olympic team. Even though she was 2nd at the U.S. Trials, she will surely be considered among the medal contenders in London by virtue of her World Record.

2012 OLYMPIC TEAM QUALIFIERS DAY 4

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Nswim
5 months ago

Tarwater was added as a 7th place finisher? Don’t see that happening to often

Admin
Reply to  Nswim
5 months ago

Yep. I remember getting that news as I was getting out of my Uber at the Omaha airport getting ready to fly back to Houston. Pulled out my iPad and reported it while standing in line to get through security.

Samesame
5 months ago

384 athletes in 5 olympics . That’s a lot . Swimming . (5 people) Equestrian ? Rowing ? In what other sports has anyone gone around 5 times

Mediocre Swammer
Reply to  Samesame
5 months ago

This only lists all the 6-time athletes, but there are a lot of sports represented: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_athletes_with_the_most_appearances_at_Olympic_Games#Multiple_appearances

Admin
Reply to  Samesame
5 months ago

Shooting disciplines notoriously have athletes compete in lots of Games. As do fencing and table tennis, sailing, fencing and luge/bobsled events in the winter Olympics. Cross country skiing, canoeing, and rowing do too, which were a bit surprising to me.

Some of that list includes athletes who have competed in both Winter and Summer Olympics, which condenses the 5 Games into a much shorter period of “peak” performance.