2024 Canadian Olympic & Paralympic Trials: Day 2 Finals Live Recap

2024 CANADIAN OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC TRIALS

Day 2 Finals Heat Sheet 

Hello everyone! Welcome back for the second of seven finals sessions at the 2024 Candian Olympic and Paralympic Trials. The athletes racing at the Torono Pan Am Sports Centre hit the ground running — we saw plenty of fast swimming on Day 1 and if this morning’s prelims are any indiciation, we are in store for more tonight.

Day 2 Finals Live Stream, courtesy CBC

Day 2 Finals Order of Events

  • Men’s Open 400 IM
  • Women’s Open 200 Free
  • Men’s Open 100 Back
  • Women’s Open 100 Breast
  • Women’s Para 100 Breast (SB4-SB9, SB11-SB14)
  • Men’s Para 100 Breast (SB4-SB9, SB11-SB14)

After the medal ceremonies, there will be ‘B’ and junior finals of the day’s events

As you can see, it’s a short but sweet finals session. The evening kicks off with the men’s 400 IM. Tristan Jankovics locked up the top time of the morning in a lifetime best 4:15.68. He and Lorne Wigginton–who owns the fastest PB in the field–were battling during the first half of their prelims heat, but Wigginton seemed to shut it down on the back half. Wigginton coasted safely into the final in 2nd place (4:19.74), seemingly saving up for the final tonight. Wigginton finished 7th at 2024 Worlds in this event and his lifetime best 4:12.81 is just .31 seconds off the Olympic Qualifying Time, which he will surely be aiming for tonight.

Then, we’re shifting over to the women’s 200 freestyle. Summer McIntosh, who qualified for Paris in the 400 freestyle yesterday–leads after prelims with a 1:56.78. Mary-Sophie Harvey, who’s swum multiple bests in this event this season, negative split her heats swim to touch second in 1:57.65. Harvey qualified for her first individual Olympic event last night (100 fly) and looks likely to add another here. But it’s going to be a tight race for the relay spots. There’s less than a second separating the third (Julie Brousseau, 1:58.25) and sixth (Sienna Angove, 1:59.22) place qualifiers. Rebecca Smith, Penny Oleksiakand Katerine Savard are lurking as well, hoping to pull off outside smoke upsets.

Led by Blake Tierney in 53.93, four swimmers in the men’s 100 backstroke are within a second of the Olympic Qualifying Time. Tierney has already been under the OQT this year and was the only man in the field under 54 seconds this morning. Aiden Norman put up a lifetime best 54.16 in prelims and could push Tierney if he’s got another drop in him, as could Raben Dommann and Javier AcevedoEven if the winner is off the OQT, they could still earn a nomination to the team for the 4×100 medley relay.

There are three straight events of 100 breaststroke to close the session. First up is the women’s 100 breast and this could be one of the closest races of the meet. After years of missing a breaststroker, there are suddenly an influx of Canadian women pushing the pace. Sophie Angus, one of three who have already been under the OQT, went 1:07.12 to lead prelims. Tokyo Olympian Kelsey Wog sits a tenth behind her in second. Shona Branton (1:07.23), Sydney Pickrem (1:07.29), and Alexanne Lepage (1:07.32) all put themselves in solid position heading into finals.

Then, we shift to the women’s and men’s para 100 breaststroke. We’ll been on Canadian record watch in both events. On the women’s side, Tess Routliffe was just three-tenths off her own S7 Canadian Para Record with a 1:31.81. She’ll be looking to break that mark tonight and put herself in position to be named to Canada’s Paralympic team. The same is true for Nicholas Bennett. Bennett broke the S14 Canadian Para Record in the men’s 200 freestyle last month and now has his eye on his own 100 breast record. In prelims, he missed his 2023 standard by just two-hundredths, swimming 1:04.43.

MEN’S 400 IM – Final

  • World Record: 4:02.50 – Leon Marchand, France (2023)
  • Canadian Record: 4:11.41 – Brian Johns (2008)
  • 2021 Champion: Collyn Gagne – 4:18.65
  • OLY Qualifying/Consideration Standards: 4:12.50/4:13.76

Top 10:

  1. Tristan Jankovics (RCAQ) — 4:11.74 *Olympic Qualifying Time*
  2. Lorne Wigginton (HP-CON) — 4:13.60 *Olympic Consideration Time*
  3. Collyn Gagne (LOSC) — 4:16.90
  4. Eric Brown (PCSC) — 4:18.29
  5. Benjamin Cote (KSC) — 4:20.67
  6. Jordi Vilchez (BTSC) — 4:21.00
  7. Carter Scheffel (BRANT) — 4:25.78
  8. Jacob Gallant (FAST) — 4:27.30
  9. Sebastian Barboza (CAMO) — 4:31.73
  10. Eduard-Daniel Rusu (CAMO) — 4:32.13

What a swim for Tristan Jankovics, who–per the CBC broadcast–has qualified to be the first Canadian man to swim the men’s 400 IM at the Olympics since 2012. After swimming the top qualifying time out of the prelims in a personal best 4:15.68, Jankovics oblierated that time. He posted an Olympic Qualifying Time of 4:11.74, qualifying for his first Olympic Games.

Jankovics, who swims for Ohio State, made his move on the backstroke leg. After letting Lorne Wigginton and Benjamin Cote take the top two spots after the butterfly leg, Jankovics took the lead at the halfway mark, flipping in 2:01.88 to Wigginton’s 2:03.17.

Jankovics did not surrender the lead again, maintaining a lead of over two seconds on Wigginton with just the freestyle remaining. He held off Wigginton and earned the win in 4:11.74. Jankovics came into the meet with a personal best of 4:17.40, which means that he has dropped 5.66 seconds over the course of the day.

Wigginton finished second in 4:13.60, outside of the Olympic Qualifying Time. That’s a huge blow to his hopes to make the Olympic team; this is his best event and his personal best is just .31 off the OQT standard. He also scratched out of the 400 freestyle final yesterday to focus on this event.

WOMEN’S 200 FREESTYLE — Final

  • World Record: 1:52.85 – Mollie O’Callaghan, Australia (2023)
  • Canadian Record: 1:53.65 – Summer McIntosh (2023)
  • 2021 Champion: Summer McIntosh – 1:56.19
  • OLY Qualifying/Consideration Standards: 1:57.26/1:57.85

Top 10:

  1. Summer McIntosh (UN-CAN) — 1:53.69 *Olympic Qualifying Time*
  2. Mary-Sophie Harvey (CAMO) — 1:55.44 *Olympic Qualifying Time*
  3. Julie Brousseau (NKB) — 1:57.60 *Olympic Consideration Time*
  4. Emma O’Croinin (HP-CVN) — 1:57.86
  5. Ella Jansen (HP-CON) — 1:58.25
  6. Brooklyn Douthwright (CNBO) — 1:58.49
  7. Sienna Angove (UN-CAN) — 1:58.53
  8. Rebecca Smith (CASC) — 1:59.14
  9. Penny Oleksiak (TSC) — 2:00.18
  10. Katerine Savard (CNQ) — 2:00.24

Though Summer McIntosh may end up bowing out of the indivudal 200 free at the Olympic Games, she still put up a world-contending time here in the championship final. McIntosh just missed her own Canadian record by four-hundredths with a 1:53.69 that ranks her second in the world this season. It’s the second sub-1:54 this season and sits only behind world record holder Mollie O’Callaghan.

The 17-year-old led the entire way, opening in 26.37. She flipped at the 100 in 55.43–a 28.70 split–then followed that with 29.38/28.88 on the back half of her race.

Behind McIntosh, there was the tight race that we expected for the relay spots. Penny Oleksiak was second at the 100-meter mark in 56.70, but couldn’t hang with the rest of the field on the second 100 and finished outside of relay consideration in 9th. After flipping in 5th at the halfway point, Mary-Sophie Harvey made her move on the third 50; she split 29.13 to move up into second place with 50 meters to go.

Harvey came home in 28.62, meaning that she split 57.69/57.75 over her race, essentially even-splitting her race after she negative split her morning swim. She touched second in 1:55.44–another personal best and Quebec Provincial record this season–earning another individual event for Paris.

After just missing the OQT in the 400 freestlye on Day 1, Julie Brousseau finished third, securing a nomination for the 4×200 freestyle relay. Like yesterday, Brousseau swam another personal best but just missing the OQT. She was still pleased in her post-race interview after clocking her 1:57.60. Emma O’Croinin joins her in earning a nomination to her first Olympic team, rounding out what will likely be Canada’s 4×200 freestyle relay with a personal best 1:57.86. For both Brousseau and O’Croinin, those swims appear to be their first sub-1:58 outings.

MEN’S 100 BACKSTROKE – Final

  • World Record: 51.60 – Thomas Ceccon, Italy (2022)
  • Canadian Record: 53.35 – Markus Thormeyer (2019)
  • 2021 Champion: Markus Thormeyer – 53.40
  • OLY Qualifying/Consideration Standards: 53.74/54.01

Top 10:

  1. Blake Tierney (GOLD) — 53.48 *Olympic Qualifying Time*
  2. Javier Acevedo (AJAX) — 53.55 *Olympic Qualifying Time*
  3. Aiden Norman (UCSC) — 53.99 *Olympic Consideration Time*
  4. Raben Dommann (HP-CVN) — 54.06
  5. Cole Pratt (CASC) — 55.17
  6. Benjamin Winterborn (KBM) — 55.78
  7. Matthew Driscoll (UN-CAN) — 55.80
  8. Parker Deshayes (CASC) — 55.95
  9. Andrew Herman (TSC) — 57.03

DSQ: Paul Dardis

It was a close race in the men’s 100 backstroke but at the touch it was Blake Tierney who took the win–qualifying to be nominated for his first Olympic Games. Tierney, who finished 18th in this event at the 2024 World Championships, led the entire race. He flipped in 25.89–the only one in the field out under 26 seconds.

He came home in 27.59, holding off a charge from veteran Javier Acevedo for the win in a personal best 53.48. That undercuts his personal best 53.65–which he swam leading off Canada’s medley relay in Doha–and puts him within sight of Markus Thormeyer‘s Canadian record.

After turning second in 26.14, Acevedo held on that position and qualified to be nominated to his third Olympics. He stopped the clock at 53.55–his first personal best in this event since 2017. Since that year’s Trials, Acevedo’s best has stood at 53.64 but he broke through tonight with a .09 second drop.

Aiden Norman continued to drop time. After swimming a 54.16 personal best in prelims, the University of Florida commit went sub-54 for the first time, squeaking under that barrier with a 53.99 for third place.

WOMEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE – Final

  • World Record: 1:04.13 – Lilly King, USA (2017)
  • Canadian Record: 1:05.74 – Annamay Pierse (2009)
  • 2021 Champion: Kelsey Wog – 1:06.77
  • OLY Qualifying/Consideration Standards: 1:06.79/1:07.12

Top 10:

  1. Sophie Angus (HP-CON) — 1:06.96 *Olympic Consideration Time*
  2. Kelsey Wog (UMAN) — 1:07.00 *Olympic Consideration Time*
  3. Sydney Pickrem (TSC) — 1:07.27
  4. Shona Branton (WES) — 1:07.54
  5. Alexanne Lepage (UCSC) — 1:07.59
  6. Katja Pavicevic (TSC) — 1:08.72
  7. Avery Wiseman (OSC) — 1:09.56
  8. Kathryn Ivanov (LAC) — 1:10.16
  9. Ashley McMillan (GO) — 1:10.33
  10. Nina Kucheran (SLSC) — 1:10.54

After nearly quitting the sport in 2022, Sophie Angus has likely earned her spot on Canada’s Olympic team after winning a close race in the women’s 100 breaststroke. Though she missed the Olympic Qualifying Time (1:06.79), Canada needs a breaststroker for their medley relay, so Angus will likely make the team as a Priority 2 swimmer in the official team announcement at the end of the meet.

Angus was tied with Kelsey Wog for third at the 50 (31.57) behind Sydney Pickrem (31.46) and Shona Branton (31.50). The four women–with teenager Alexanne Lepage just behind and trying to get in on the action–pushed each other all the way to the final touch. Angus split 35.39 to get the job done in 1:06.96. She’s already been 1:06.66 this season at the 2024 World Championships.

Wog finished just four-hundredths behind Angus in 1:07.00–a season best for her. She was clearly disappointed to miss the OQT and the team but like many other swimmers in this field, she’ll have another chance to hit the standard in the 200 breaststroke later in the meet.

After turning first, Pickrem took third in 1:07.27. Branton fell back to fourth in 1:07.54, just holding off Lepage’s 1:07.59.

WOMEN’S PARA 100 BREASTSTROKE  – Final

  • Canadian Para Records/Paralympic MSQ/MET Standards:
    • SB5: 2:01.19 – Valerie Drapeau (2017)/2:01.79/2:11.48
    • SB6: 1:42.80 – Camille Berube (2021)/1:42.59/1:50.45
    • SB7: 1:31.31 – Tess Routliffe (2024)/1:43.34/1:47.16
    • SB8: 1:19.44 – Katarina Roxon (2016)/1:28.79/1:31.61
    • SB9: 1:16.93 – Jessica Sloan (2000)/1:22.51/1:25.25
    • SB13: 1:17.12 – Kirby Cote (2002)/1:23.39/1:27.57
    • SB14: 1:24.04 – Justine Morrier (2018)/1:23.30/1:25.29

Top 10:

  1. Tess Routliffe (UL) — 1:30.47 (1030 Para Points) *New Canadian SB7 Para Record and Paralympic MSQ*
  2. Katarina Roxon (AASC) — 1:25.71 (877 Para Points) *SB8 MSQ*
  3. Abi Tripp (CNQ) — 1:40.42 (790 Para Points) *SB7 MSQ*
  4. Maxine Lavitt (UMAN) — 1:25.79 (681 Para Points) *SB13 MET*
  5. Emma Van Dyk (BROCK) — 1:31.10 (567 Para Points)
  6. Ruby Stevens (RCAQ) — 2:09.80 (546 Para Points) *SB5 MET*
  7. Ella Tucker (MTA) — 2:11.30 (531 Para Points) *SB5 MET*

After missing her record in prelims, Tess Routliffe took down the mark tonight. Routliffe broke her own SB7 Canadian Para record by .84 seconds. She swam 1:30.47, putting herself in a strong position to be named to the Paralympic team at the conclusion of the meet. Routliffe split 42.39 on the opening 50, then came back in 48.08.

Katarina Roxon and Abi Tripp also hit the MSQ cuts in their respective classifications. Swimming in SB8, Roxon earned 877 Para Points with her 1:25.71 time while Abi Tripp earned 790 thanks to her 1:40.42.

MEN’S PARA 100 BREASTSTROKE – Final

  • Canadian Para Records/Paralympic MSQ/MET Standards:
    • SB8: 1:23.12 – Joseph Barker (2010)/1:14.84/1:18.71
    • SB9: 1:08.56 – James Leroux (2019)/1:12.19/1:14.06
    • SB14: 1:04.41 – Nicholas Bennett (2023)/1:08.69/1:10.03

Top 10: 

  1. Nicholas Bennett (RDCSC) — 1:03.71 (1049 Para Points) *New Canadian Para SB14 Record and Paralympic MSQ*
  2. James Leroux (UL) — 1:12.43 (803 Para Points) *SB9 MET*
  3. Fernando Lu (LOSC) — 1:12.87 (790 Para Points) *SB9 MET*
  4. Charle Giammichele (GHAC) — 1:23.49 (770 Para Points)

That’s two Canadian Para records in two events. Nicholas Bennett was even closer to his SB14 record in prelims than Routliffe was to her’s. In prelims, Bennett clocked 1:41.43, missing his mark by two-hundredths. He was well under his standard tonight, shattering the mark with a 1:03.71.

Bennett was out faster than he was in the morning–29.61 at the turn in finals compared to 30.03 in the heats. He was three-tenths faster on his second 50 as well, splitting 34.10 to get his hands on the wall and break 1:04 for the first time. The time puts Bennett in a good position to be named to his second Paralympic team.

In This Story

191
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of

191 Comments
newest
oldest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
TomDeanBoxall
12 days ago

McIntosh out of the 100 BK as per the startlist: https://results.swimming.ca/2024_Olympic_Paralympic_Trials/StartList_10.pdf

Interesting as to why she might’ve scratched, surely it would’ve been a good simulation for her heavy load in Paris?

Greg P
Reply to  TomDeanBoxall
12 days ago

She said she was disappointed with her 400.

So maybe now she just wants to focus on her Olympics events to swim scorching time in 200/400 IM and 200 fly to send signal to her competitors.

ScovaNotiaSwimmer
Reply to  TomDeanBoxall
12 days ago

Maybe she planned to have an extra chance to test her speed if needed but felt her speedy 200 Free was enough of a benchmark.

TomDeanBoxall
Reply to  ScovaNotiaSwimmer
12 days ago

Makes sense. Was looking forward to seeing her swim on all days of Trials though!

Jonathan
12 days ago

Looks like the Canadian women will be fighting for bronze in the women’s 800 free relay in Paris, maybe silver if someone on USA has a bad split.

Greg P
Reply to  Jonathan
12 days ago

Doubtful.

The podium will be AUS, USA, and China.

KRB
Reply to  Jonathan
12 days ago

I think the Bronze is out of reach.

Hard to believe but several years ago, I thought Smith, Sanchez, Ruck and Oleksiak would be peaking their careers in Paris, with a medal in the 4X200 almost guaranteed, and it now looks like none of them will be even swimming it.

bob
Reply to  KRB
12 days ago

Gotta love that HPC Toronto…great coaches..no?

"we've got a boilover!"
Reply to  KRB
12 days ago

Totally, all of the 2000/01 era…

ooo
Reply to  KRB
12 days ago

I tought exactly the same. They were so far away from the rest of world then.

Sub13
Reply to  Jonathan
12 days ago

I think Canada will be lucky to get bronze. China is signficantly faster based on flat starts, and USA will probably be 5+ seconds faster than Canada after trials.

Sherry Smit
12 days ago

So here’s the thing. Oleksiak was out 26, 29, then went 30, 32. She has the speed, and if she’s out 26 in a 200, I hope/believe she can potentially be out at a 25 high maybe 26 low in the 100. I see her getting a relay spot in the 100, but not anywhere close to her PB of 52.5

Greg P
Reply to  Sherry Smit
12 days ago

“she can potentially be out at a 25 high maybe 26 low

She may be out in 25 high, but super highly unlikely she come back in 26 low.

In w100 free final in Fukuoka, only MOC came back in 26, the rest came back in 27 or 28.

I’m sorry, but Oleksiak is not MOC.

Oleksiak may still qualify for relay, but she won’t come back in 26.

Random123
Reply to  Greg P
12 days ago

the comment says she can be out in 26 low, not come back

Troyy
Reply to  Greg P
12 days ago

They’re talking about her front half being 25 high or 26 low.

Sherry Smit
Reply to  Greg P
12 days ago

Thats not what I meant. I mean that she may be able to go out in a 25.7-26.2.

CanuckSwimFan
Reply to  Sherry Smit
12 days ago

also imho 100fr is not as competitive as 200fr. I think if Penny gets under 54 she’s likely top 5. Given current form is there anyone else other than Summer, Mac Neil, Ruck, MS Harvey that are likely under 54?. Although Harvey has yet to get under 54 in a flat race I’d have to think in her current form she’s quite likely to do it here.

54’s aren’t going to win us a medal in the 4×1. The relay splits will likely need to average very low 53 to have any hope of a bronze medal in Paris.

Greg P
Reply to  CanuckSwimFan
12 days ago

Right now, w4x100 free podium is the same as w4x200:

AUS, USA, China

hanqihao
Reply to  Greg P
12 days ago

China’s women’s relay three events can win MEDALS is very good results, can win silver is a surprise

Troyy
Reply to  Sherry Smit
12 days ago

I always thought of Penny as one of those swimmers whose 100 is built off their 200 training so will be interesting see what she can produce.

MTK
Reply to  Sherry Smit
12 days ago

Yeah, wouldn’t surprise me if she’s in form enough to go like 53.5-53.9. That will definitely make relay. TBD it that gets her an individual swim.

NUSwimFan
12 days ago

Will be interesting to see the discretionary picks. Jansen has an A cut at an approved meet in the 400 free and taking her for the 4×200 prelims might be beneficial to resting MSH and Summer. Do you take either Branton or Lepage since they both have an A cut to give you more options in the 4×100 medley in case one of them can step ahead of Angus? More of these questions with other swimmers surely coming in the next couple days too

CanuckSwimFan
Reply to  NUSwimFan
12 days ago

Too early to worry about discretionary pics too many events left to come especially the 100 free. See who gets on with the first priority then fill in behind. Also a few weeks ago the criteria was updated to address more specifically how 12 relay only spots might be delegated.

Albertaswimfan
Reply to  NUSwimFan
12 days ago

commentator said they may take a second male breastroker but that seems unlikely

Admin
Reply to  Albertaswimfan
12 days ago

May come down to how many other events Finlay races. If all he’s got is prelims/finals, a 2nd breaststroker seems like overkill.

Besides that, they’ll need close-to their top squad in prelims to be sure they make the final given no Thormeyer, no Gaziev…

phelpsfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
12 days ago

Knox isn’t that good of a breaststroker, and besides Canada probably won’t make the final anyways.

Last edited 12 days ago by phelpsfan
Rafael
Reply to  Braden Keith
11 days ago

what would happen if they bring 2 Relay Only breaststroker and one did not swim because the team didn´t final?

Sceptic
Reply to  NUSwimFan
12 days ago

How a 1.58 swimmer might be useful to the team in 4 x 200? If mentality is Ella’s main challenge, then on top of a questionable PB, a crumbling in prelims might jeopardize their chances to qualify for the final, doesn’t it?

Troyy
Reply to  Sceptic
12 days ago

The women’s relay prelims are less cut-throat than the men’s so a 1:58 swimmer should be fine.

Sub13
Reply to  Sceptic
12 days ago

Canada had 3 1:58s and a 1:59 in Fukuoka and qualified 6th, almost 3 seconds ahead of 9th.

Women’s 4×200 is not deep internationally

Rafael
Reply to  Sub13
12 days ago

They wont try that in Paris and that would be risky now if NZ, germany and Brazil go all out on prelims

Drew Christensen
12 days ago

MSH is killing it, what a meet so far. Pretty shocked Oleksiak/Savard didn’t pull through in the 200, but the 4×200 relay still looks to be pretty damn strong

CanSwimFan
Reply to  Drew Christensen
12 days ago

Strong as in fourth or fifth place.

swimswimaus
Reply to  CanSwimFan
12 days ago

who do u picture in front of them, other than the aussies and americans?

Gen D
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

Chinese

commonwombat
Reply to  Gen D
12 days ago

On paper, it certainly reads that way. The X factor may relate to how this recent fracas regarding 2021 positive tests continues to play out and any psychological impacts on the team.

yamatake
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

Chinese very likely. GB probably.

CanuckSwimFan
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

China is other likely medalist… 4th could be between GB and Canada.. to be in contention for medal our 3rd and 4th swimmers would likely have to average low 1:56. Assuming MS Harvey can replicate mid 1:55 and summer high 1:53.

Just Keep Swimming
Reply to  CanuckSwimFan
12 days ago

China ahead of Canada. GB nowhere near Canada if you’re looking at time add ups from trials.

CanuckSwimFan
Reply to  Just Keep Swimming
12 days ago

You are correct using trials results Canada would be ahead of them. Their top swimmer (Freya Anderson I think) was recovering from illness or injury. She proved fitness in the 100fr. They added her to team. I’m not sure strictly adding up trials time though necessarily shows likelihood of finish. In Canada’s case I think all 4 scored PBs so that certainly is positive.

Troyy
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

China

Weinstein-Smith-Ledecky-Sims
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

People’s Republic of China

Yang Junxuan – 1:54.37 (lead-off leg)
Li Bingjie – 1:54.39 (2024 split)
Ai Yanhan – 1:55.57 (2023 split)
Liu Yaxin – 1:55.46 (2023 split)
Tang Muhan – 1:55.00 (2021 split)
Zhang Yufei – 1:55.66 (2021 split)

Yang Junxuan matched her lead-off leg split from the Tokyo Olympics at the 2024 Chinese National Swimming Championships.

Southerly Buster
Reply to  swimswimaus
12 days ago

China has 7 women in the Top 30 of the 200 Freestyle season rankings; Canada has 2.

The Chinese have 1 x 54, 1 x 55, 2 x 56 and 3 x 57-lows. Those seven all have faster times than Brousseau, the 3rd ranked Canadian.

TomDeanBoxall
Reply to  Southerly Buster
12 days ago

Top 4 from Trials for CAN and CHN are:
CAN: 7:44:59
CHN: 7:44:07

Surprisingly Can is only half a second behind, but China has more depth which is very important for this relay in particular. Can are going to have to rely on McIntosh dropping a 1:53 though the 4×2 is in the same session as the 2 fly final. In Fukuoka, McIntosh split 1:53:97 after the 2 fly.

I think it will take a 7:40 to podium?

Troyy
Reply to  TomDeanBoxall
12 days ago

Li Bingjie split 1:54.5 in Doha earlier this year which is much faster than the 1:56 she went at nationals (she was already selected based on swims in Fukuoka and Doha).

Rafael
Reply to  Troyy
12 days ago

Also consider yufei on the relay

Greg P
Reply to  TomDeanBoxall
11 days ago

“I think it will take a 7:40 to podium?”

2023 Worlds 7:44.40

2022 Worlds 7:44.76

2019 Worlds 7:44.35

2020 Olympics 7:41.29

Probably 7:41 – 7:42 will get to podium.

2020 was extremely fast: China broke WR, USA American Record, Australia Oceania Record

TomDeanBoxall
Reply to  Greg P
11 days ago

Yeah, sorry I was thinking of Tokyo too much. Didn’t realise how much of an outlier it was.

Weinstein-Smith-Ledecky-Sims
Reply to  Drew Christensen
12 days ago

You realize Li Bingjie posted a relay split of 1:54.59 in the women’s 4 x 200 meter freestyle relay at the 2024 World Aquatics Championships? Toss in a lead-off leg split of 1:54.37 from Yang Junxuan and China is in strong contention for a medal in the W 4 x 200 FR-R at the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Ploki
12 days ago

Summer McIntosh just withdrew from the 100 back (source: trust me bro)

No but actually it’s on SplashMe and probably on the live results

danjohnrob
12 days ago

I don’ t understand. If Sophie Angus has made the team as a relay participant and made the consideration time, why can’t she swim the individual race? Doing so would not increase the number of swimmers in the meet overall, and it’s not like there won’t be slower athletes from less developed swimming nations!

commonwombat
Reply to  danjohnrob
12 days ago

Via a very simple workaround. Angus has the WA A QT from Doha so Swim CAN use that as her entry time.

Greg P
Reply to  danjohnrob
12 days ago

Who said Sophie Angus can’t swim 100br in Paris?

She has A time from Doha and she’s already in the team.

canada clears
Reply to  danjohnrob
12 days ago

swimming canada selects those with the A cut at any time in the qualification period as long as they finish in the top 2, since angus has 1:06.66 from doha, she will swim individually

CanuckSwimFan
12 days ago

MS Harvey seems to be having the meet of her life so far. 2 races 2 big pbs. If I’m Pickrem I might be concerned about my spot in the 200 IM. Although Pickrem’s pb is about 1.5 seconds faster in the IM, Harvey shaved 0.7 off her 100m butterfly pb & 1.4 from her 200 free pb. Given the 200 IM is the last day it could come down to who has the most energy left.

Albertaswimfan
Reply to  CanuckSwimFan
12 days ago

Also 2 other women who have LB under OQT, going to be super interesting

Admin
Reply to  Albertaswimfan
12 days ago

By the letter of the priority, they shouldn’t get to go in the individual event unless they were top two.

However, the “to enhance relays” priority (#4) is at the discretion of the High Performance Director, and that gives him a little more flexibility. Presumably if they’re taken to enhance relays they could then swim the individual.

"we've got a boilover!"
Reply to  CanuckSwimFan
12 days ago

Very true. A few months ago I would have said her best shot would have been 200fly based on her 4IM endurance and 100fly speed. But she is showing her age group versatility in amazing ways across multiple events, almost a “Summer light”. She could have, might come away with berths in 100/200 free, 2/4 IM, 100 fly. And remarkably it was her Backstroke from 50-200 that stood out in her ISL years!

Bill G
Reply to  "we've got a boilover!"
12 days ago

And MSH held the 15-17 national age group record in the 200m breasstroke back in the day (beating Allison HIgson’s record from 1988).

ScovaNotiaSwimmer
Reply to  "we've got a boilover!"
12 days ago

I’ve always said that she’s not recognized enough for her pure versatility. She might not have the world-leading times in her best events (if you can even select “best”‘events for her!) like Douglass, MacIntosh or McKeown, but I truly believe she could swim basically any event on a world stage and be in the conversation for finals. That’s what made her perfect for an ISL-type league.

About Sophie Kaufman

Sophie Kaufman

Sophie grew up in Boston, Massachusetts, which means yes, she does root for the Bruins, but try not to hold that against her. At 9, she joined her local club team because her best friend convinced her it would be fun. Shoulder surgery ended her competitive swimming days long ago, …

Read More »