Watch Michael Andrew Break the 100 Breast American Record at 58.19

2021 U.S. OLYMPIC SWIMMING TRIALS

  • When:
    • Wave I Dates: June 4-7, 2021
      • Wave II Dates: June 13-20, 2021

During heat 6 of the men’s 100 breast, 22-year-old Michael Andrew downed Kevin Cordes‘ 2017 American record of 58.64 by nearly a half second at 58.19, easily taking the top seed heading into semi-finals. MA’s former personal best was at 58.67, just 0.03s off the former AR.

Along with now being the fastest American in event history, Andrew is now the 3rd-fastest performer all-time, only sitting behind Dutchman Arno Kamminga (57.90) and world record-holder Adam Peaty of Great Britain (56.88). Andrew also cracked the top-25 performances list in history, where Peaty holds 22 of the 25 swims. Kamminga currently holds the No. 16 and No. 19 performances of 57.90 and 58.10 from this past spring. Andrew’s swim this morning registers as the No. 23 performance of all-time.

All-Time Top Performers: Men’s 100 BR LCM

  1. Adam Peaty (GBR), 56.88 – 2019
  2. Arno Kamminga (NED), 57.90 – 2021
  3. Michael Andrew (USA), 58.19 – 2021
  4. Ilya Shymanovich (BLR), 58.29 – 2019
  5. Nicolo Martinenghi (ITA), 58.37 – 2021
  6. Cameron van der Burgh (RSA)/James Wilby, 58.46 – 2012/2019
  7. Brenton Rickard (AUS), 58.58 – 2009

Andrew’s time this AM also would have either won or placed second in the last three Olympic finals. During the 2016 Olympic final, South African Cameron van der Burgh placed second at 58.69 to Peaty’s then-world record of 57.13. Rewind to the 2012 Olympics, van der Burgh took the Olympic title with a then-world record of 58.46. Diving back to the 2008 Beijing Olympic final, Japanese Kosuke Kitajima won the title with a world record time of 58.91.

Split Comparison

Split Michael Andrew, 2021 U.S. Olympic Trials – Prelims Kevin Cordes, 2017 World Championships
50m 27.05 27.41
100m 31.14 31.23
Final Time 58.19 58.64

2020-2021 LCM Men 100 Breast

AdamGBR
Peaty
04/14
57.39
2Arno
Kamminga
NED57.8007/24
3Michael
Andrew
USA58.1406/13
4Nicolo
Martinenghi
ITA58.2807/24
5Ilya
Shymanovich
BLR58.4605/17
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Swimmer
1 month ago

But how much money does his dad make?

swimmer
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

Apparently he is only able to afford training in a community pool and doing dryland with used gym equipment because of his “financial upbringing”

Cate
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

Lol.

monsterbasher
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

Bruh. Considering that a lot of top talent comes from the Bethesda MD and McClean VA area (ex. Ledecky, Seliskar), which are areas occupied predominantly by upper-middle-class to upper-class families, I don’t think Michael Andrew is an outlier within the socio-economics of swimming considering his family’s background. Even though i’m a hardcore swimming fan, I don’t know how the community deludes themselves thinking that swimming as a whole is NOT a privileged sport.

Last edited 1 month ago by monsterbasher
bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

Well, don’t all sports require some level of privilege to perform at a decent/high level?

monsterbasher
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

I don’t know mate. Ronaldo, Messi, and Lebron did well considering their extremely poor family background. Swimming is an extreme example within the economics of sports because of the exorbitant costs attached to club membership fees, tech suits, and other equipment. You’ll be hard-pressed to find swimmers receive college scholarships from just a high-school swim level training with a cheap speedo, unlike basketball or soccer where most of the upfront cost is from the clothing and shoes.

Last edited 1 month ago by monsterbasher
bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

From what I know club membership fees can be reduced or nullified through a scholarship if an individual’s family qualifies. I know that’s very rare but it’s still a thing for those who cannot afford a club membership. Also, I never really realized how cheap of a sport soccer is. It’s a bit ironic considering the big bucks the major professionals make.

SuperSwimmer 2000
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

They are super talented, physically gifted athletes. That in itself is a privilege. No amount of money is going to buy me another 7-8 inches in height and a 40-inch vertical.

monsterbasher
Reply to  SuperSwimmer 2000
1 month ago

Money buys you a facility, coach, lzr suit, and meet fees.

Sophie
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

It’s very hard to think of very successful swimmers that come from a low-income background – or perhaps they just do not talk about growing up in that situation very much.

The only one I can think of off the top of my head is Dagny Knutson, but her story tends to be one of tragedy.

While swimming is by no means the most expensive sport (e.g. tennis, skiing, etc.), it also is not the cheapest and by no means accessible to everyone. It seems like swimming tends to be so location and situation dependent, with specific areas of the country producing the vast majority of talent.

swimfast
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

No. Not at all

swimfast
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

Swimming has a relatively extremely expensive price tag to even join a club team. Then factor in all the traveling one does monthly just to stay remotely competitive + cost of suits which corrode very easily in a noxious chemical + amount of food consumption given the aerobic nature of our sport (compared to others) + gas cost considering many swimmers don’t have the luxury of living super close to a competitive swim club. Even if you didn’t even belong to a club team the cost to merely swim at a crappy public pool is no less than $4 a day. Some charge as much as $20 per entry no matter how good you are.
By comparison football can… Read more »

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  swimfast
1 month ago

I’m assuming you mean professional swimmers because I don’t know of many age group club swimmers that have to travel monthly in order to stay competitive, but maybe my point of view is too narrow. Also, I wasn’t specifically talking about privileges in terms of wealth but just overall. I definitely agree with club swimming being pretty expensive in comparison to other sports. I think soccer is even cheaper than football because don’t you eventually need gear to play football on a team? For soccer, all you need is a ball.

Jack
Reply to  bobthebuilderrocks
1 month ago

I think it was in a Malcolm Gladwell book where he cited studies why swimming requires more money than track and field, it’s not the swimming trunks but the pool and infrastructure around training

Fluidg
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

Truly pathetic comment. An 8 course meal of crow is being prepared for you and all the other haters. You know who you are.

Beverly Drangus
Reply to  Fluidg
1 month ago

In defense of Swimmer, I think his comment was a sarcastic one in reference to an article on this site the other day that gratuitously implied that Michael owes his success to his family’s money. I think the reactions to this comment demonstrate how inappropriate that article was.

Alo
Reply to  Swimmer
1 month ago

How is that relevant?

Emg1986
1 month ago

That start was utterly outrageous.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
Reply to  Emg1986
1 month ago

Wow, half a body length just on the start.

HJones
Reply to  Emg1986
1 month ago

His start was always decent but holy cow when did it get THAT good? Might not be quite Dressel-level on the start, but that was some serious speed.

Fluidg
Reply to  HJones
1 month ago

1/2 body length lead on the breakout. That start was Dressel level stuff.

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Fluidg
1 month ago

Until he comes up half a body length behind Dressel in the 50 free.

Swimlikefishdrinklikefish
Reply to  Emg1986
1 month ago

Is it start or pull out? I can see him getting a lot stronger on the pull out over the last few years

Emg1986
Reply to  Swimlikefishdrinklikefish
1 month ago

Pull out is particularly impressive I think. Unfortunately, the camera angle isn’t ideal.

Dan
1 month ago

Wish the people doing the production would have better video coverage and more underwater videos, but maybe when it comes to showing the highlight replays they can have more and better underwater videos. I know this is for the mainstream audience, but some more video of starts/turns and a few strokes underwater would be nice.

Cate
Reply to  Dan
1 month ago

The mainstream audience is what is getting this on TV at all.

Dan
Reply to  Cate
1 month ago

Well, it isn’t really on TV, or at least not as in other parts of the world.
Remember that for the 1996 Olympics I figured I was going to be able to watch most swimming live as I remember that was possible in Europe before 1996 (and is still possible) and with the Games being in Atlanta, GA, USA I thought it would have been better here. Guess how surprised I was when people call me from Europe (even during finals) and told me what they saw on TV before I could see it here (have not got much better since).

Fluidg
Reply to  Cate
1 month ago

Dumbing down coverage for a “mainstream” audience is a huge mistake. It makes the sport (any sport) far less interesting for everyone. What would truly help improve swimming coverage and grow the audience is more astute analysis in the commentary.

Deep end
Reply to  Fluidg
1 month ago

I think you forget how dumb Americans are. We love being talked down at and fluffed up especially those over 50 which are the ppl watching the tele these days.

Give it 20-30 years. The world is changing (I think). Imagine an Olympics where everyone has rights. So a swimswam broadcast, NBC broadcast, me on twitch broadcast sayin some real crazy stuff (you’ll love it just you wait!!).

Tupperware
1 month ago

I mean, too early to tell, but that should secure the mens medley gold, no? Assuming the US’s backstroke prowess doesnt completely disappear

Philip Johnson
Reply to  Tupperware
1 month ago

I’ve been told over and over and over the Brits will unequivocally win gold so I’m just going to go with that

College swimmer
Reply to  Philip Johnson
1 month ago

If Murphy/casas can beat larkin by a few tenths on back, dressels fly should have a spread equivalent to peaty in breast, so basically it comes down to held or whoever our freestyler is holding off Scott. If MA, can go sub 50 in fly, it could be worth going Wilson breast, MA fly, and Dressel free, but I haven’t ran the numbers

Dan
Reply to  College swimmer
1 month ago

I think Larkin is Australian, might be Greenbank for GB with a PB of 53.3

Horninco
Reply to  Tupperware
1 month ago

Brits and Russians will have something to say for sure, but if USA gets anything close to or sub 52.0 and 58.0 dressel will put it out of reach of anything save sub 46

Big Poppa Pump
1 month ago

Reece Whitley with the Oof of the meet so far. 29th sheesh

ArtVanDeLegh10
Reply to  Big Poppa Pump
1 month ago

I’d say Zane Grothe, the top seed in the 400 Free, might trump Reece.

Joris Bohnson
1 month ago

Nice swim Michael Andrew

Mustangswimdad
1 month ago

I hope he gets his Chipotle sponsorship. He obviously needs the money.

rice
Reply to  Mustangswimdad
1 month ago

I unironically want to see this happen. It would be like Kitajima being sponsored by coca cola

Xman
Reply to  rice
1 month ago

I wish they sold a coca cola wim club cap and suit.

The Japanese used to have cool suits with nest colors and their sponsors.

SwimReason
1 month ago

I love to watch swimmers get excited about a prelim swim. Awesome swim, Michael Andrew!

Last edited 1 month ago by SwimReason

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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