2022 Australian Trials: Day 2 Prelims Live Recap

2022 AUSTRALIAN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Follow along below for a live recap and analysis of the day 2 prelims session at the 2022 Australian World Champs Trials. On the docket today in the women’s 100 fly, the men’s 50 fly, the women’s 50 breast, the men’s 200 freestyle, the women’s 400 IM, women’s 50 backstroke, and the men’s 200 breaststroke.

Women 100 Fly Prelims

  • World Record: 55.48 – Sarah Sjostrom (2016)
  • World Junior Record: 56.46 – Penny Oleksiak (2016)
  • Australian Record: 55.72 – Emma McKeon (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: 55.59 – Maggie MacNeil (2021)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 58.33

Top 8:

  1. Brianna Throssell – 58.25
  2. Alexandria Perkins – 58.69
  3. Gemma Cooney – 59.15
  4. Elizabeth Dekkers – 59.34
  5. Lily Price – 59.44
  6. Brittany Castelluzzo – 59.56
  7. Laura Taylor – 59.85
  8. Rebecca St Vincent – 1:00.02

In the first heat of the night, Brianna Throssell put up the fastest time with a 58.25 to undercut the FINA A cut right away. Throssell raced this event for Australia at the Tokyo Olympics and wound up placing 12th in semis with a 57.59. We’ll see if she can get down towards her lifetime best of 57.02 during finals. She swam that PB at the 2019 World Championships.

Throssell’s training partner Alexandria Perkins was the victor of heat 2, dipping under 59 seconds with a 58.69. Her PB in this event is slightly faster than this swim and sits at a 58.61. That means it will take a PB during finals for her to get under the FINA A.

In heat 3, Gemma Cooney was the only one under a minute when she won the heat with a 59.15 to beat her entry time of 59.59.

Those winners of the first three heats mark the top 3 swimmers from the heats. Elizabeth Dekkers was 4th overall with a 59.34, while Lily Price (59.44), Brittany Castelluzzo (59.56), and Laura Taylor (59.85) each got under a minute as well.

3rd seed Abbey Webb was disqualified from this event, having entered with a 59.09 behind Perkins’ 58.61.

Men 50 Fly Prelims

  • World Record: 22.27 – Andriy Govorov (2018)
  • World Junior Record: 23.05 – Andrei Minakov (2020)
  • Australian Record: 22.73 – Matt Targett (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record: 22.73 – Matt Targett (2009)

Top 8:

  1. Kyle Chalmers – 23.42
  2. Isaac Cooper – 23.75
  3. Ben Armbruster – 23.76
  4. William Yang – 23.78
  5. Cody Simpson – 23.79
  6. Lewis Burras* – 23.88
  7. Grayson Bell – 23.92
  8. Joseph Jackson / James Bayliss – 24.20

After finishing second in the men’s 100 butterfly on day 1 of the meet, Olympic champion Kyle Chalmers was the quickest man in the heats of the 50 butterfly. He put up a 23.42 to slightly beat his entry time of 23.48. 100 fly champion Matthew Temple didn’t race this event.

Isaac Cooper was around 0.3 slower than Chalmers with a 23.74 to jump up from his 8th place seed of 24.17. Behind Cooper, a group of 6 men swam between 23.76 and 23.92. Ben Armbruster was the #3 man here with a 23.76, which is also an improvement on his 11th placed seed of 24.28.

Among the others were presumptive World Championships qualifiers in the 100 butterfly, Cody Simpson, and the 50 freestyle, Grayson Bell. Additionally, William Yang and Lewis Burras got into the top 7 with a 23.78 and 23.88, respectively.

There was a tie here for 8th place between Jospeh Jackson and James Bayliss who both hit a 24.20, but they will both advance into the A final as Lewis Burras of England isn’t eligible for the A final.

Women 50 Breast Prelims

  • World Record: 29.30 – Benedetta Pilato (2021)
  • World Junior Record: 29.30 – Benedetta Pilato (2021)
  • Australian Record: 30.16 – Sarah Katsoulis (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record: 29.72 – Lara van Niekerk (2022)

Top 8:

  1. Chelsea Hodges – 30.22
  2. Jenna Strauch – 31.14
  3. Mikayla Smith – 31.55
  4. Abbey Harkin – 31.62
  5. Mia O’Leary – 31.68
  6. Talara-Jade Dixon – 31.77
  7. Felicity Chan – 31.91
  8. Matilda Smith – 31.93

After placing third in the 100 breaststroke on day 1 and missing the World Championships team, Chelsea Hodges put up the top time of the prelims in the 50 breaststroke. She hit a 30.22 in the event to get within 0.06 seconds of the Australian record held by Sarah Katsoulis.

This swim for Hodges is just off her best time of 30.17. While Hodges will advance into the final in first place, the 50 breaststroke is not a qualification event for the World Championships.

100 breaststroke qualifiers Jenna Strauch and Abbey Harkin went 2-4 in the 50 breaststroke heats with a 31.14 and 31.62, respectively. Mikayla Smith got into the top 3 with her swim of 31.55 after placing 7th overall in the 100 breast.

Men 200 Free Prelims

  • World Record: 1:42.00 – Paul Biedermann (2009)
  • World Junior Record: 1:44.62 – Hwang Sun-woo (2021)
  • Australian Record: 1:44.06 – Ian Thorpe (2001)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:44.06 – Ian Thorpe (2001)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 1:47.06

Top 8:

  1. Zac Incerti – 1:46.84
  2. Flynn Southam – 1:47.39
  3. Charlie Hawke – 1:47.56
  4. Elijah Winnington – 1:47.60
  5. Mack Horton – 1:47.80
  6. Samuel Short – 1:47.85
  7. Matthew Temple – 1:48.30
  8. Kai Taylor – 1:48.40

Charlie Hawke delivered an outside smoke performance in the first heat of the men’s 200 freestyle when he posted the heat-winning time of 1:47.56 from lane 8. That was a solid drop from his PB of 1:50.44 and was enough to out-touch Elijah Winnington‘s 1:47.60.

Two more men got under 1:48 in the heat in the form of 400 freestyle runner-up Mack Horton (1:47.80) and the man who Horton narrowly beat out in the 400 freestyle, Samuel Short (1:47.85).

In heat 2, 16-year-old Flynn Southam overtook the #1 position with a 1:47.39. His morning swim here is a bit slower than the 1:46.77 swim that he unleashed earlier this year. No one else in that heat cracked 1:48, but James Koch finished second to Southam with a 1:48.86.

It wasn’t until heat 3 that we saw our first 1:46 in the field, but Zac Incerti powered to a 1:46.84 to crack the FINA A cut and get into first place. Incerti has been as fast as a 1:46.18 before but has only been under 1:47 3 times in his career.

Interestingly, Incerti has swum a 1:46.18, 1:46.64, and 1:46.89 (and now a 1:46.84), but has never swum a 1:47 in his career. His 5th-best time is a 1:48.49 from 2021. Incerti won a bronze medal at Tokyo 2020 in the 4×200 free relay, splitting a 1:45.75 for Australia.

Women 400 IM Prelims

  • World Record: 4:26.36 – Katinka Hosszu (2016)
  • World Junior Record: 4:36.71 – Mio Narita (2022)
  • Australian Record: 4:29.45 – Stephanie Rice (2008)
  • Commonwealth Record: 4:29.12 – Summer McIntosh (2022)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 4:43.06

Top 9:

  1. Kaylee McKeown – 4:42.40
  2. Jenna Forrester – 4:43.02
  3. Mya Rasmussen* – 4:43.07
  4. Kiah Melverton – 4:45.49
  5. Ella Ramsey – 4:46.32
  6. Kayla Hardy – 4:46.80
  7. Francesca Fitzhenry – 4:50.12
  8. Madeline Snell – 4:51.13
  9. Emilie Muir – 4:51.35

Kaylee McKeown had a seemingly relaxed performance in the first heat of the women’s 400 IM, delivering a 4:42.40 to place first in her heat. She was under the FINA A cut, which bodes well for her upcoming finals efforts.

Mya Rasmussen of New Zealand was second in the first heat with a 4:43.07 but won’t swim the A final as she’s not Australian.

The winner of heat 2, Jenna Forrester was a few seconds slower than her entry time of 4:39.46 with a 4:43.02 which will be enough to get her into the A final. World Championships gold medalist in the 4×200 freestyle relay Kiah Melverton placed second in heat 2 with a 4:45.49.

Ella Ramsey and Kayla Hardy put up a pair of 4:46s, which gets them into the final. It’ll take a drop, however, for them to have a shot at getting into the top 2 and under the FINA A. Outside of the top 6, no one cracked 4:50 and Francesca Fitzhenry was 7th with her 4:50.12. Considering that Rasmussen is ineligible, the 9th-fastest woman, Emilie Muir, will get into the final with her 4:51.35.

Women 50 Back Prelims

  • World Record: 26.98 – Liu Xiang (2018)
  • World Junior Record: 27.49 – Minna Atherton (2016)
  • Australian Record: 27.16 – Kaylee McKeown (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: 27.16 – Kaylee McKeown (2021)

Top 8:

  1. Mollie O’Callaghan – 27.80
  2. Bronte Job – 27.86
  3. Madi Wilson – 28.25
  4. Hannah Fredericks – 28.59
  5. Holly Barratt – 28.66
  6. Minna Atherton – 28.71
  7. Alyssa Burgess – 28.88
  8. Layla Day – 29.04

100 freestyle champion Mollie O’Callaghan showed her backstroke strength here in the 50 back prelims, delivering a 27.80 to make herself the top seed heading into finals. She’s been as quick as 27.75 before back in 2020. While the 50 backstroke isn’t a World Championships qualifying event, O’Callaghan could be nominated to race this event at World considering that she’s already qualified in the 100 freestyle.

O’Callaghan will also race the 100 backstroke later on in the week and is the 2nd overall seed to Olympic champion Kaylee McKeown with a 58.86.

Bronte Job was the only other woman under 28 seconds in this event and, like O’Callaghan, holds a PB of 27.75. Madi Wilson qualified for Worlds in the 4×100 freestyle and has placed third overall here into the final with a 28.25.

Behind 4th place, Hannah Fredericks, and 5th place Holly Barratt, world junior record holder Minna Atherton was more than a second off her best time of 27.49 with a 28.71.

Men 200 Breast Prelims

  • World Record: 2:06.12 – Anton Chupkov (2019)
  • World Junior Record: 2:09.39 – Qin Haiyang (2017)
  • Australian Record: 2:06.28 – Zac Stubblety-Cook (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: 2:06.28 – Zac Stubblety-Cook (2021)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 2:10.32

Top 8:

  1. Zac Stubblety-Cook – 2:10.14
  2. Joshua Yong – 2:11.69
  3. Matt Wilson – 2:12.07
  4. Adam Selwood – 2:13.09
  5. Angus Menzies – 2:14.25
  6. David Schlicht – 2:14.92
  7. Alex Milligan – 2:15.36
  8. Cooper van der Laan – 2:15.57

The heavy favorite to win this event is reigning Olympic champion Zac Stubblety Cook who swam an Australian record-breaking swim of 2:06.28 to win this event in Tokyo. Stubblety-Cook hasn’t raced a lot this season but announced himself as a medal contender yet this year when he swam a 2:08.22 in April.

Stubblety-Cook was off his PB and season-best, but he didn’t need a best time to get into the final and will have the potential for improvement during the final. Joshua Yong was entered with a 2:14.18 and got down to a 2:11.69 to make the second seed heading into the final behind Yong.

In order to get onto the team, Yong will need to get down to the FINA A cut of 2:10.32 and will need to hold off 3rd seed and former world record holder Matt Wilson. Wilson swam a 2:06.67 back in 2017 to crack the world record, which Anton Chupkov broke later that day.

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Franco
1 month ago

can’t wait to see kaylee mckeown

Last edited 1 month ago by Franco
commonwombat
1 month ago

Very little noteworthy from this session.

W100FLY: Throssell should not be troubled beating this field. Whilst it would be nice to see a sub57, I’m not expecting one. A second qualifier is possible but not guaranteed.

M50FLY: Nothing significant to report and not really expecting anything earthshattering tonight given Temple’s absence.

W50BRS: Hodges …. daylight. Would suprise to see anyone else below 31sec. A possible selection scenario MAY arise should Hodges throw down a barnstormer tonight; ie not only break the NR but smash it. Think it may need something sub30; but a time that would scream potential World medal may pose a question for selectors.

M200FR: Times were respectable but not spectacular. Neill missing final is a shock; Southam… Read more »

Jackman
1 month ago

Wilson will attempt to qualify for Worlds after missing the Olympic team last year.

Wilson did make the Olympics last year, and I’m really rooting for him to get back to form.

Jason
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Well technically he missed the FINA qualifying time and during the meet was told he wouldn’t be attending, until I believe it was the last day of trials and they offered a compassionate spot. I’m with you though Jackman, I hope he gets back to 2.06 and can compete again with the best in the world.

Troyy
Reply to  Jason
1 month ago

He got the FINA qualifying time but not the tighter Australian one.

August
1 month ago

Is Kyle going to Worlds? He just posted World champs bound with my brother Matt on Instagram stories

Jackman
Reply to  August
1 month ago

Good catch! He said only a couple days ago on Brett’s podcast that he wasn’t. Bruno’s story that he reposted seemed to be trying to convince him to come to Budapest.

Troyy
1 month ago

I thought after age champs that Petric might be saving his taper for trials and he just missed the 200 breast final nearly 3 seconds off his PB.

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyy
Sub13
1 month ago

No Minna Atherton?

Negative Nora (they/them)
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

She’s into the 50BK final in 6th, 28.7. Still not approaching her 2019 form, like Matt Wilson. I think she moved coaches one or twice since Trials last summer as well, so she still seems hungry.

Sub13
Reply to  Negative Nora (they/them)
1 month ago

Oh thanks. I’m not watching, just following MeetMobile and it doesn’t have a time for her so I assumed she must have scratched

commonwombat
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Atherton has had a pattern of having an “on year” followed by a few “off years”. Little evidence so far that 2022 is the former rather than the latter.

Oceanian
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

She sure has more ‘off’ years but then again so did Lani Pallister until a day or two back.

commonwombat
Reply to  Oceanian
1 month ago

2015 & 2016 (just missed Rio selection) “on” then “off” 2017-2019. Definitely “on” 2019, 2020 – ?, 2021 – mostly “off”. Window of opportunity is still there even if we see MOC backstroke mirror her freestyle as MOC will need to make choices re event priorities/race schedules. However, if another young backstroker seriously enters the selection equation then it does get precarious for Atherton. Maybe looking more to the 200 may work for her.

Troyy
Reply to  commonwombat
1 month ago

15 yo Barclay went 1:00.16 at age champs so you’d have to think she’ll be wanting to transition to senior competition over the next couple of years. She’s still got until the end of the year before she ages up.

Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

Mollie O’Callaghan is who Americans wish Claire Curzan was

Miss M
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

Has anyone seen Mollie swim fly?

Troyy
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

That’s just unnecessary and probably not even true.

Mako
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

Exactly. Why can’t we celebrate these exceptionally talented athletes for who they are without comparing them to each other?

Robbos
Reply to  Mako
1 month ago

Exactly, I have huge respect for American swimmers & I think Curzan will have her time.

new york’s battle leader
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

talk to me when mollie can easily translate into the 1fly and go below a 56.35 and 56.20

therealAJC
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

Mollie is Mollie…Claire is Claire…both exceptional young swimmers

baddies
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

why pit two bad bitches against each other?

Swimswamswum
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

That’s nice, but

Gretchen Walsh is still the most talented female sprinter ever!

JimSwim22
Reply to  Swimswamswum
1 month ago

EVER? Hahahaha

Taa
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

Curzan is closer to a world record than Mollie.100fly vs 100fr. Curzan wins in the backstroke. Curzan is better in the 50fr than Mollie in the 200fr(each persons best secondary event) 24.17 is better than a 1:55,. Curzan is world class in 3 strokes Mollie only 2. Curzan is younger. Okay its pretty close 100 free is a glamour event so people give it more weight but I think Curzan is heading sub 56 in her fly and sub 53 in the free. We shall see. I think if Mollie does some stellar anchor duty on the relays at worlds it will really increase her stock.

Troyy
Reply to  Taa
1 month ago

You probably should wait until the end of the meet for such comparisons if at all.

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyy
Awsi Dooger
Reply to  Taa
1 month ago

Curzan needs to find a way to sustain her speed 5 more meters. That was my impression from the first time I saw her. Nothing has changed subsequently. She takes it out fast but not rapid enough to separate on international level. Then during the second 50 the stroke distance and turnover rate diminish when she’s still far enough away from the wall for other ultra elites to go by her. Maybe she’ll find the extra strength and stamina in college. That’s all the difference between gold potential and bronze/4th level. Torri Huske is in the same boat.

Pacific Whirl
Reply to  Taa
1 month ago

Do two months make a significant impact? Curzan is only two months junior than O’Callaghan. Also, Curzan never proves that she can duplicate that mysterious 24.17 outside of her home pool. Mollie swam 1:55 at the OLYMPICS. Curzan went 57s thrice at the Olympics after registering quadruple 56s in the same season.

Last edited 1 month ago by Pacific Whirl
Jason
Reply to  Jacob Whittle 46.90 in Paris
1 month ago

really…. These athletes are so different I don’t get the comparison. Claire is 17, Molly is 18 – both have heaps of improvement in them. They’re babies just starting their elite swimming careers.

Troyy
Reply to  Jason
1 month ago

Mollie’s only 3 months older.

Troyy
1 month ago

It’s Mollie time.

Negative Nora (they/them)
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

Have been excited for her backstroke races – especially the 2BK, really hope she doesn’t scratch it this week. Hasn’t really focused on it at a taper meet before.

Sub13
Reply to  Negative Nora (they/them)
1 month ago

I’m just not sure how likely it is she’ll do 100/200 free, 50/100/200 back, plus 4-5 relays. That’s a huge program for her first senior team swimming individual events. She’ll have to scratch something I would think.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Unless she does a big PB in the 50 back I hope she just does the 100/200 free and 100 back.

Negative Nora (they/them)
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Agreed. I think the 50BK would be a waste of effort for her at this point in her career, especially after the times from US Trials and McKeown ripping down insane 50s in practice prior to Tokyo. 100/200FR & 100/200BK would be feasible, but maybe sticking to 3 of the 4 would be best (if she qualifies in each of the four and actually swims all four here at Trials). 200FR & 100BK clash, so maybe 1/2FR + 2BK unless she throws down a 58flat or something.

Last edited 1 month ago by Negative Nora (they/them)
Taa
Reply to  Negative Nora (they/them)
1 month ago

The 2back really takes the legs out of you. Now do 3 of them