2017 U.S. Open: Michael Andrew, Sharli Brady Scratch A Finals on Day 5

2017 U.S. OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS

There was quite a bit of shuffling in both the women’s and men’s 200 IMs. Sharli Brady, from the University of Missouri, declined her spot in the women’s A final after she finished sixth in prelims with a 2:16.05 (PBx0.32). That means #9 Mia Nonnenberg of Alabama, with 2:17.30, will move into the A final tonight.

Kristin Malone of Texas A&M, whose 2:17.82 was the 10th-fastest swim of the morning, scratched the B final to concentrate on her 50 free final, where she qualified sixth. Likewise, Madison Homovich of Marlins of Raleigh opted to forego her B-final spot in the 200 IM to concentrate on the 1500 free, where she is seeded fifth. Homovich dropped 1.02 in prelims of the 200 IM with 2:18.35 and finished 14th.

The three empty spots in the B final will be taken by #17 Savanna Faulconer of Y-Spartaquatics/University of Florida (2:18.84 in prelims), #18 Beata Nelson from Wisconsin Aquatics (2:19.05), and #19 Christie Jenson of Indiana University (2:19.05).

On the men’s side, Race Pace Club’s Michael Andrew, third this morning with 2:02.35, bowed out of the A final of the 200 IM to concentrate on the 50 free, where he is seeded sixth going into tonight’s final. That moves Gator Swim Club’s Alexander Lebed, ninth out of heats with 2:03.54, into the A final.

In the B final, University of Missouri’s Nick Alexander, 14th with 2:04.08, and Jarrett Jones, 16th with 2:04.43, both scratched. #17 Phillip Willett of Missouri State, whose 2:04.91 was a PBx0.96, #18 Adam Noens of Boilermaker Aquatics/Purdue University (2:05.32, PBx0.09), and #19 Brennan Balogh of Lincoln Select (2:05.34) all move into the B final.

Nary an athlete scratched the A or the B finals of the women’s and men’s 50 freestyles. There were two swim-offs among four women: Alyssa Marsh and Wisconsin Aquatics’ Marissa Berg, tied for 16th with 26.21, competed to see who would swim in tonight’s B final. Berg earned that right with a 25.99-26.09 win. The other swim-off was for 26th. Clare Lawlor of Princeton Piranhas and Jess Unicomb of Wisconsin both went 26.42 in prelims, so in the event there would be enough scratches to move one of them into the C final, they raced again. Lawlor went 25.95 to Unicomb’s 26.73. With no one dropping out of any of the three finals, Lawlor sits alone as the second alternate. However, she leaves East Meadow with a PBx0.50; seeded with 26.45, she went 26.42 in prelims, then 25.95 in the swim-off. Had she done that in prelims she would have qualified 10th overall.

Prelims results:

Women 200 LC Meter IM

  • American: 2:06.15 7/27/2009 Ariana Kukors
  • S. Open: 2:08.66 5/17/2015 Katinka Hosszu
  • US Open Meet: 2:11.06 8/3/2013 Justine Mueller
  1. Margaret Aroesty, LIAC 2:15.11
  2. Nora McCullagh, TXLA 2:15.66
  3. Fantine Lesaffre, FRA 2:15.71
  4. Lisa Bratton, TAMU 2:15.87
  5. Vanessa Pearl, MTRO 2:15.97
  6. Sharli Brady, UMIZ 2:16.05
  7. Meaghan Raab, NAC/UGA 2:16.69
  8. Kelly Fertel, GRSC 2:16.85

Men 200 LC Meter IM

  • American: 1:54.00 7/28/2011 Ryan Lochte
  • S. Open: 1:54.56 7/10/2009 Ryan Lochte
  • US Open Meet: 1:59.26 11/30/2006 Michael F Phelps
  1. Ryan Lochte, TROJ 1:59.82
  2. Sam Stewart, TXLA 2:01.88
  3. Michael Andrew, RPC 2:02.35
  4. Xavier Mohammed, SW 2:02.45
  5. Kyle Maas, MLA 2:03.19
  6. Ross Palazzo, HEAT 2:03.29
  7. Kieran Smith, RAC 2:03.39
  8. Brock Bonetti, TAMU 2:03.40

Women 50 LC Meter Freestyle

  • American: 23.97 7/30/2017 Simone Manuel
  • S. Open: 24.13 5/18/2008 Cate Campbell
  • US Open Meet: 24.90 8/8/2009 Jessica Hardy
  1. Madison Kennedy, MAC 25.42
  2. Marie Wattel, FRA 25.55
  3. Gretchen Walsh, NAC 25.73
  4. Margo Geer, FORD 25.77
  5. Amanda Kendall, UN-IN 25.77
  6. Kristin Mallone, TAMU 25.80
  7. Rebecca Millard, TXLA 25.81
  8. Courtney Caldwell, WOLF 25.88

Men 50 LC Meter Freestyle

  • American: 21.15 7/29/2017 Caeleb Dressel
  • S. Open: 21.14 7/9/2009 Cesar Cielo
  • US Open Meet: 21.73 8/8/2009 Nicholas Brunelli
  1. Brad Tandy, UN-AZ 21.95
  2. Cullen Jones, WOLF 22.17
  3. Tate Jackson, TXLA 22.66
  4. Robert Howard, BAMA 22.67
  5. Brett Ringgold, NTN 22.69
  6. Michael Andrew, RPC 22.70
  7. Kyle Robrock, UN-CO 22.87
  8. BJ Hornikel, UN-SE 22.88

 

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expert coach
4 years ago

Why no mention in any articles of how MA is the ONLY swimmer to make the A final in TWO events? Quite the accomplishment. Congrats!

samuel huntington
Reply to  expert coach
4 years ago

LOL

Cate
Reply to  expert coach
4 years ago

Sarcasm?

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Cate
4 years ago

5 Star sarcasm here

Swimmer?
4 years ago

Bowed out of A final…. or was scared of a guy almost twice his age whooping him.

E Gamble
Reply to  Swimmer?
4 years ago

I didn’t expect Michael Andrew to beat Ryan Lochte in a 200 IM. Ryan could beat most with very little practice.

E Gamble
4 years ago

I just don’t get this. Why would you scratch a 200 IM to focus on a 50 free. Why wouldn’t you do both? It’s practice for Junior Worlds. ?

Speed Racer
Reply to  E Gamble
4 years ago

I believe it was to try and maintain a spot on the National Team. Currently he has a spot in the 50free but is the 5th person. Apple is above him but is also going to WUGs so anything he does at WUGs will not matter really in terms of making the National Team or not. Chadwick is the second spot in the 50 at WUGs and currently NOT on the 50list for the National Team so he could bump MA down to the 6spot with a great WUGs swim. 50Free is such a tight race at any meet. Anyone finishing above him at US Open this evening could have passed him and pushed him off the National Team since… Read more »

Speed Racer
Reply to  Speed Racer
4 years ago

Sorry I had the wrong roster. Held and Virva are going to WUGs. Which really does put him on the bubble since both could best his time and push him off the roster.

Swimmer1
Reply to  Speed Racer
4 years ago

Great post and valid explanation. Thank you.

Billabong
Reply to  Speed Racer
4 years ago

Yes, looks like your were spot on. It looks very tight, but he should manage to stay on the roster. Good management from is coach/father.

Cate
4 years ago

At his age, he should be able to do a double. This makes no sense

Pvdh
Reply to  Cate
4 years ago

He can barely do a 200m IM without collapsing in the freestyle leg. Let alone a double

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Pvdh
4 years ago

no yardage explains a lot to me ………time for a change – when will it come ? we dont know yet

DLswim
Reply to  ERVINFORTHEWIN
4 years ago

Agreed. He needs to start training correctly to take it to the next level, like being an Olympic medalist. He is incredibly talented and it would be a shame if it was wasted.

anonymous
Reply to  Pvdh
4 years ago

How many times has he doubled and tripled and gotten best times?…dozens…but the haters criticize him when he doubles and criticize him when he doesn’t.

Science Geek
Reply to  anonymous
4 years ago

True

Porkchop2244
4 years ago

At this point Its completely fair: who and why would anyone sponsor Michael Andrew? He’s done nothing at the world level…nothing…how are they making even a drop of money

Admin
Reply to  Porkchop2244
4 years ago

Uhhh……he’s a World Champion. At both the World Junior Championships and the senior SC World Championships.

And I know your response is going to be “who cares it was a fake event, not an Olympic event, at meets nobody cares about.”

But…you said nothing twice. By repeating the word, I’m inferring that you meant “nothing.” Which is an inaccurate word to apply to what he’s done at the world level. If you meant something other than “nothing,” the floor is yours to clarify what you meant.

Porkchop2244
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

“Nothing” to warrant a financial sponsor. What I said and what I mean. There is no marketability. Name last winner of a junior world championship without winning an all level world championship that brought a company money. These companies aren’t stupid…he won the 100 IM in short course with an empty field. But let’s say the field was stacked. Name the last person who’s greatest accomplishment was wining a short course 100m IM ONLY who brought a company money. How many viewers watched him win that 100IM. Was it publicized in America on prime time on a major network? Europe for that matter? Did ESPN write an article? No. So yes I stick by nothing. I didn’t say he’s accomplished… Read more »

anonymous
Reply to  Porkchop2244
4 years ago

I read Michael Andrew’s twitter feed the other day and saw he added fins to his starting blocks. So I dropped 2k to get the same. You have no idea what kind of following he has.

Colinb
Reply to  Porkchop2244
4 years ago

Plenty of other metrics to warrant sponsorship, social media traction and name recognition play a huge roll, MA has both. He has not insignificant achievements in the pool and although he has plenty still to accomplish and it remains to be seen whether he can do it, right now he has a presence and is making an impact, at the very least his in pool achievements are worthy of some long term investment. If you don’t believe me just ask Adidas;)

Porkchop2244
Reply to  Colinb
4 years ago

Well see how long that lasts…social media…maybe I’ll grant that in this day and age, but at some point you have to do big things in the pool. He has not. He is a full second behind Dressel in free. Dressel is only 20. Even in hundred breast in which he hasn’t improved in a year, he’s a second behind the best American.

Again I’m not saying he hasn’t accomplished anything. I’m saying he hasn’t accomplished anything big enough to warrant a financial sponsor, at least in the pool. Social Media, maybe, but this is swimming, not a lot of money to be made in social media. Adidas might throw a little money his way for social media and… Read more »

Speed Racer
Reply to  Porkchop2244
4 years ago

At times I do wonder if this is not the swimming version of the Marinovich Project. I feel for the man. To be responsible for a large aspect of your family’s livelihood at such a young age is a little intense.

anonymous
Reply to  Speed Racer
4 years ago

They own an import export business, I believe. I assume MA is not anywhere close to being the main breadwinner.

Becky D
Reply to  Porkchop2244
4 years ago

I don’t understand all the MA antipathy. The guy is running an experiment (sample size: 1) using methods that don’t follow standard swim training orthodoxy. You can choose to observe and draw conclusions from what you see, or you can shout into the wind.

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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