Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Day 6 Prelims Live Recap

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

World record-holders Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel lead events into today’s prelims session at the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Ledecky will kick things off in the 800 free, where she set the world record at the 2016 Olympics. The 24-year-old Ledecky is looking to remain undefeated on the world stage in this event, hoping to add a third-straight Olympic gold to her four consecutive World Championships golds in the 800.

China’s Wang Jianjiahe is the #3 performer of all-time and Italy’s Simona Quadarella the #4 performer of all-time. They’ll chase Ledecky in today’s heats.

Dressel leads the men’s 100 fly, where he broke a Michael Phelps world record at the 2019 World Championships. He’ll battle young risers Kristof Milak of Hungary, Matthew Temple of Australia and Andrei Minakov of Russia.

The women’s 200 back will not feature the world record-holder, as Regan Smith missed out on the U.S. Olympic team. The two swimmers who beat her, Rhyan White and Phoebe Baconwill represent Team USA, but the clear favorite is Australia’s Kaylee McKeownwho is the #3 performer of all-time and within a second of Smith’s world record.

The session will end with new Olympic lineup addition the mixed-gender 4×100 medley relay. Each nation will swim two men and two women in a traditional medley relay order (back/breast/fly/free). The event is one of the most complex, strategically, in the Olympic program, and this morning’s heats will allow a few key nations to test out some strategies while other nations rest their top competitors ahead of the day 7 final.

Keep refreshing this page for live, event-by-event recaps of tonight’s (local time; morning in the U.S.) qualifying heats.

Women’s 800 freestyle – Prelims

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Katie Ledecky (USA) – 8:15.67
  2. Katie Grimes (USA) – 8:17.05
  3. Simona Quadarella (ITA) – 8:17.32
  4. Sarah Kohler (GER) – 8:17.33
  5. Anastasiia Kirpichnikova (ROC) – 8:18.77
  6. Ariarne Titmus (AUS) – 8:18.99
  7. Kiah Melverton (AUS) – 8:20.45
  8. Wang Jianjiahe (CHN) – 8:20.58

The fastest four times came out of the second semifinal, as the field really surged in Katie Ledecky‘s wake. Ledecky went 8:15.67, well off her world record, but still a second and a half up on the field.

15-year-old American Katie Grimes swam an incredible race, trailing Ledecky in second much of the way, falling back behind a few others with 100 to go, then surging past the field again to finish second in the heat and second overall at 8:17.05.

At U.S. Olympic Trials, we noted the eerie similarities between the 15-year-old Grimes and a 15-year-old Ledecky, who both made huge time drops to make the U.S. Olympic team in the 800 free as teenagers. Grimes went 8:20 in 2021; Ledecky 8:19 back in 2012. Ledecky continued to expand her profile that year by dropping to 8:14 while winning gold at the Olympics, but Grimes now put together a big time drop of her own with this morning’s 8:17. She moves past Janet Evans in the all-time 15-16 ranks and trails only Ledecky in that age group.

One more Grimes note: she actually out-split Ledecky on the final three splits in heats, dropping from consistent 31-mids to 31.1/30.8/29.7 over her final 150.

World 1500 free champ Simona Quadarella is into the final in third, finishing tenths behind Grimes in that heat, and Germany’s Sarah Kohler closed in sub-30 to finish a hundredth behind her.

Anastasiia Kirpichnikova blasted a huge Russian record out of the first semifinal, going 8:18.77 to take almost three seconds off her national mark. She chased down 200/400 free gold medalist Ariarne Titmus of Australia to win that heat. Behind Titmus, her countrywoman Kiah Melverton had a big closing split to pass China’s Wang JianjiaheThey all made the final, albeit in spots 5-6-7-8, with Germany’s Isabel Gose the top swimmer left out at 8:21.79. China’s 4×200 free relay gold medal anchor Li Bingjie was 10th in 8:22.49.

Before the circle-seeded heats, 14-year-old Summer McIntosh dropped about four and a half seconds off her best time to re-break Canada’s national age group record for 13-14s. Notably, McIntosh is faster than the United States national age group record, and faster than Ledecky herself was at age 14. Ledecky was 8:30.14 at 14 but had a huge breakout to 8:14.6 as a 15-year-old.

Men’s 100 butterfly – Prelims

  • World Record: Caeleb Dressel (USA) – 49.50 (2019)
  • Olympic Record: Joseph Schooling (SGP) – 50.39 (2016)
  • World Junior Record: Kristof Milak (HUN) – 50.62 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Joseph Schooling (SGP) – 50.39
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Men’s 100 butterfly

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Caeleb Dressel (USA) – 50.39
  2. Kristof Milak (HUN) – 50.62
  3. Jakub Majerski (POL) – 50.97
  4. Andrei Minakov (ROC) – 51.00
  5. Noe Ponti (SUI) – 51.24
  6. Josif Miladiniov (BUL) – 51.28
  7. Luis Carlos Martinez (GUA) – 51.29
  8. Matthew Temple (AUS) – 51.39
  9. Joshua Liendo (CAN) – 51.52
  10. Mehdy Metella (FRA) – 51.53
  11. Nyls Korstanje (NED) – 51.54
  12. Naoki Mizunuma (JPN) / Tom Shields (USA) – 51.57
  13. Szebasztian Szabo (HUN) / Youssef Ramadan (EGY) – 51.67
  14. Sun Jiajun (CHN) – 51.74

Caeleb Dressel was out uncharacteristically slow in heats, sitting just 5th in his heat at the 50 turn in 23.8. Note that at U.S. Olympic Trials, Dressel was out in 23.3 in both heats and semifinals and 23.1 in the final. But even that lack of early speed couldn’t keep Dressel from the #1 spot. He soared back in 26.54 to tie the Olympic record and take the top prelims spot by three-tenths.

He moves into a tie for that Olympic record with his former club teammate Joseph Schooling. The two swam together for the Bolles School Sharks and competed against one another in the NCAA for four seasons. Schooling’s 50.39 won Olympic gold five years ago.

200 fly champ Kristof Milak was 50.62 for second. He went 50.1 at European Championships back in May, and if he and Dressel swim well, it’s possible we see them both challenge the 50-second barrier in semifinals and/or finals. Dressel is the world record-holder and Milak sits #4 all-time behind Dressel, Michael Phelps (49.82) and Milorad Cavic (49.95).

There were a flood of national records in this race. Jakub Majerski took Poland’s record below 51 seconds for the first time ever, going 50.97 for third. Nyls Korstanje broke the Dutch record in 51.54, placing 11th. Youssef Ramadan tied for 14th, setting a new Egyptian record in 51.67.

Outside of the semifinal qualifiers, Tomoe Hvas took a tenth off his own Norwegian record in 52.22. Shane Ryan broke the Irish record in 52.52.

Noe Ponti was just off his own Swiss record in 51.24 – that was good for fifth place and another swim.

Some big names missed the semifinals in a pretty fast event overall. Defending Olympic champ Schooling finished 44th for Singapore in 53.12. Defending Olympic silver medalist Chad le Clos was 18th and should be out barring any scratches. With bronze medalist Laszlo Cseh not on the Hungarian team in this event, that means that we should have three brand-new medalists in this event unless le Clos somehow scratches in.

Great Britain’s James Guy was a no-show, likely saving up to be ready for the British mixed medley relay later in this session.

Women’s 200 backstroke – Prelims

  • World Record: Regan Smith (USA) – 2:03.35 (2019)
  • Olympic Record: Missy Franklin (USA) – 2:04.06 (2012)
  • World Junior Record: Regan Smith (USA) – 2:03.35 (2019)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Maya DiRado (USA) – 2:05.99
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 200 backstroke

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Kaylee McKeown (AUS) – 2:08.18
  2. Ryan White (USA) / Kylie Masse (CAN) – 2:08.23
  3. Phoebe Bacon (USA) – 2:08.30
  4. Liu Yaxin (CHN) – 2:08.36
  5. Taylor Ruck (CAN) – 2:08.87
  6. Peng Xuwei (CHN) – 2:09.03
  7. Emily Seebohm (AUS) / Katalin Burian (HUN) – 2:09.10
  8. Lena Grabowski (AUT) – 2:09.77
  9. Tatiana Salcutan (MDA) – 2:09.98
  10. Margherita Panzier (ITA) – 2:10.26
  11. Laura Bernat (POL) – 2:10.37
  12. Africa Zamorano Sanz (ESP) – 2:10.72
  13. Aviv Barzelay (ISR) – 2:11.13
  14. Sharon van Rouwendaal (NED) – 2:11.24

100 back gold medalist Kaylee McKeown took care of business in heats with a 2:08.18 for the top qualifying spot. The 20-year-old Australian is the #3 swimmer of all-time in this event, though she was nearly four seconds off her best time this morning. It was a pretty casual session of heats for the backstrokers, with 16th place actually half a second slower than 16th place was at the Olympics five years ago.

Both Australians are into semis, with Emily Seebohm tying for 8th. The United States also gets two into the semis with Rhyan White second (2:08.23) and Phoebe Bacon fourth (2:08.30). White tied with Canada’s Kylie Massefresh off an Olympic silver in the 100 back.

There will be a lot of nations with two semifinalists here. China got both Liu Yaxin and Peng Xuwei into the top 8. Canada adds 6th-place Taylor Ruck to Masse. Ruck hasn’t been anywhere near her career-bests this year, but a 2:08.87 today is a nice swim for her and four-tenths faster than her season-best.

Right now, the top 8 features two swimmers each from Australia, the United States, Canada and China. Hungary’s Katalin Burian (tied for 8th with Seebohm) is the lone swimmer outside those countries in the top 8.

Defending Olympic silver medalist Katinka Hosszu missed the semifinals in 20th place. Now 32, the legendary Hosszu has struggled through these Games, and this was her final event entry individually.

Mixed 4×100 medley relay – Prelims

  • World Record: China (Xu, Yan, Zhang, Yang) – 3:38.41 (2020)
  • Olympic Record: N/A
  • World Junior Record: USA (Grant, Matheny, Huske, Walsh) – 3:44.84 (2019)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: N/A
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Mixed 4×100 medley relay

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Great Britain – 3:38.75 ER
  2. USA – 3:41.02
  3. China – 3:42.29
  4. Australia – 3:42.35
  5. Italy – 3:42.65
  6. Netherlands – 3:43.25
  7. ROC – 3:43.73
  8. Israel – 3:43.94

Great Britain pretty much loaded up its best lineup this morning and broke the European record in 3:38.75. That time is just three-tenths of a second off the world record set by China late last year.

Kathleen Dawson led off in 58.50, notably better than her time from the individual 100 back. (She was 58.56 in semifinals of that race and 58.70 for sixth in the final). Adam Peaty crushed a 57.08 split on breaststroke, the major difference-maker here. Based on our best research, that’s the #3 breaststroke split of all-time behind Peaty’s 56.59 from the 2016 Olympics and 56.91 from the 2017 World Championships.

After scratching the 100 fly individually, James Guy split 50.58 – he’s been an absolute relay hero for the Brits so far and had the best fly leg of any swimmer in the heats today. Freya Anderson split 52.59 on the anchor, a solid improvement over her 52.8 split on the 4×100 free relay.

It’s still likely Great Britain swaps her out for Anna Hopkin in the final. Hopkin split 52.6 in heats of the 4×100 free relay and then went 52.7 from a flat start in the individual 100 free. Subbing in Hopkin could be the edge the Brits need to break the world record in the final, which is a full day after heats. The final will take place on Saturday morning local time, Friday night U.S. time, or during Day 7 finals.

The United States gave Regan Smith a shot to lead off this relay, and she delivered with a 57.64. That would rank as the #5 swim of all-time in the 100 back, though only unofficially – leadoffs from mixed medley relays are not eligible for world records due to potential drafting advantages. Still, it’s a breakthrough swim for Smith, who is still just 19 years old and seems to be getting better as the meet goes on and she gets more comfortable in the Olympic spotlight.

Andrew Wilson split 59.0 on breastroke – he’ll probably swap out in the final for either Michael Andrew, Lydia Jacoby or Lilly King. Tom Shields went 50.8 for a solid fly leg coming off of a 51.5 individual 100 fly heats swim not much earlier today. Abbey Weitzeil anchored in 53.4. It’s unclear what the U.S. plans to do for the final, where Andrew and Caeleb Dressel will both have tough doubles. Andrew should swim the 50 free semis right before this relay, and Dressel will likely have the 100 fly final and 50 free semis in that session.

China swam its exact same quartet that broke the world record late last year. They mostly cruised to third in 3:42.29. Xu Jiayu was 52.6, close to his 52.5 time from the 100 back final. Flyer Zhang Yufei can be much faster than her 57.3 split today – she was 55.6 from a flat start while taking silver in the individual 100 fly. But she’s also coming off a brutal 200 fly/200 free double this morning in which she set Olympic records and won Olympic gold in both races, so a slower prelims swim here is pretty understandable. She should really benefit from the full day between heats and finals, making China a real gold medal threat here.

Australia swam a complete off lineup, but still made the final easily. Bronte Campbell was an excellent 52.3 on the anchor leg, and Zac Stubblety-Cook gave both this relay and the men’s medley a big boost by splitting 58.8. Stubblety-Cook was a disappointing 1:00.0 in the individual 100 breast, which probably ruled this relay and the men’s medley out of medal contention. But his bounce-back puts those two Australian relays back in the medal mix.

Italy got a 58.3 breaststroke split from Nicolo Martinenghi, the individual 100 breast bronze medalist. They should get faster by putting Thomas Ceccon on backstroke for the final, where he’s more than a second faster than Simone Sabbioni‘s 53.9 this morning.

The Dutch were also led by a big breaststroke split: 58.1 from 100 breast silver medalist Arno Kamminga. They should swap 53.1 Ranomi Kromowidjojo for Femke Heemskerk in the final. Heemskerk split 51.9 on the 4×100 free relay.

Russia made the final with using 100 back gold medalist Evgeny Rylov or 100 free bronze medalist Kliment Kolesnikov. Maria Kameneva split 53.9 on free.

Meanwhile Israel snuck into the final with a massive national record 3:43.94. That took more than four seconds off the standing national record. Anastasia Gorbenko led off in 59.59 and Gal Cohen Groumi was 51.0 on fly.

Canada gambled on a off-lineup, not using 100 fly champ Maggie MacNeil or 100 free defending champ Penny Oleksiak. They paid the price with a 13th-place finish that missed the final, although Canada probably didn’t have the breaststroke leg to contend for a medal here anyways. They’ll instead save up MacNeil and Oleksiak for the women’s medley relay.

Coming off of a battle with leukemia, Japan’s Rikako Ikee made her second appearance of these home Olympic Games. And for the second time, her relay came up in 9th place and out of the final. Ikee split 53.7 on freestyle here as Japan finished in 3:44.15, just two-tenths behind Israel. Ikee was 53.6 on a 4×100 free relay earlier this week that finished 9th and just 0.3 seconds out of the final.

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Togger
1 month ago

It’s not this session but I’m so excited for Scott vs MA on the last length of that 200 IM.

So much potential drama, MA could have a body length at 15m and it will still be far from over.

Last edited 1 month ago by Togger
Facts
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

At this point the IM is Wang vs Scott given how MA looked in the semis

anonymous
Reply to  Facts
1 month ago

Ohh MA will be in contention no doubt

Pags
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

I agree. He did NOT go full gas in the fly and back legs of the semis. It wasn’t to save it for the free leg (which always sucks for him, no matter what pace he goes out in), it was to save it for the finals.

I don’t know if MA will win, but everyone will have a lot bigger gap to close on the last 50 than they did in the semis.

anonymous
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

Scott split 34.22 in breast slower than the girls coming home in the 100 breast

Bizarre
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

What a weird point. Andrew split 30.6 slower than girls coming home in the 200 free. Even Slower than some girls coming home in the 400 IM.

lol
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

lmao what a pathetic response. MA split 30.6 in free. slower than girls coming home in the 200 free, let alone the 100 free. hell even some girls in the 400 IM had faster last 50s.

swim fan
Reply to  lol
1 month ago

slower than Grimes coming home in the 800…

Little Mermaid
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

MA needs more baking soda intake! That will get him home under 30

Jackman
1 month ago

USA: Smith (F) – Wilson (M) – Shields (M) – Weitzel (F)
AUS: Cooper (M) – Stubblety-Cook (M) – Throssel (F) – B Campbell (F)
GB: Dawson (F) – Peaty (M) – Guy (M) – Anderson (F)
ROC: Tarasevich (M) – Prigoda (M) – Surkova (F) Kameneva (F)
CHINA: Xu (M) – Yan (M) – Zhang – (F) – Yang (F)

AUS, ROC and CHN with Classic MMFF

M d e
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

What’s with Australia’s obsession with trying to get Throssell medals on relay teams she shouldn’t be on?

ice
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

To be fair to Brianna, if they are going with MMFF, she is the next butterflier in line after Emma

Sub13
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Who would you have put in? Can’t swim Emma on the heat because of her loaded program. Temple would be doing a double, and would probably require us to put Kaylee into a double as well.

MMR is weird.

M d e
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

I would have put Neale in and used mollie on the 4×2

swimfan95
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

yeah obviously if we hindsight we would have put her in and changed the order. but you can’t change that now. besides we need a indicator if Throssell can do the prelim of the medley relay bc Emma will be busy doing the 50 free

Last edited 1 month ago by swimfan95
M d e
Reply to  swimfan95
1 month ago

That’s all true I’m just really salty.

swimfan95
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

im upset about it too. the first sign was when we saw the prelim line up and then after that the order of the final :/ we saw it coming before the coaches did

Samesame
Reply to  swimfan95
1 month ago

We saw it coming 24 hours ago exactly

Bizarre
Reply to  Samesame
1 month ago

I mean yeah that’s the point. That’s what hindsight is, are you serious?

M d e
Reply to  Bizarre
1 month ago

It’s not hindsight if you see it before it happens.

Boomer
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Seems like US is going to go Murph-Jacoby-Huske-Dressel in the final, interesting.

For Aus, don’t know if they’ll go MMFF, FMFM or FMMF in the final.

Jackman
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

Might depend on Temple this morning

Sub13
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

I would say one of the following:
Mitch/ZSC/Emma/Cate
Kaylee/ZSC/Emma/Kyle
Kaylee/ZSC/Temple/Cate

Zac is really the only sure thing.

Robbos
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

No it be Kaylee/ZSC?Temple/Emma for sure.

Verram
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

TFor finals id prefer kaylee Zac Emma then Kyle Chalmers to anchor so she can overcome the British and Chinese for medals

Nlm78
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

You’d thank to think it will also depend on how much energy Kaylee uses up in her 200m backstroke, since if she goes as expected the relay would be after the SF.

Drama King
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

With those 46.6, 46.4 splits , i put Chalmers into the conversation.
Kayler, Zac, Emma, Chalmers

Nlm78
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

That was actually the four I thought we would originally go in with, but then I remembered Kaylee also has the 200m back in the same session, so it might put a question mark over her.

Stephen
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

thats gotta be the team, that’s the 3.38 low team

Stephen
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Wow that’s different ….Aussie may not have selected their relay finals team yet.
Judging by last evening. They selected the team 5 weeks ago.

Stephen
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

When you use a female for the Breast. You open the door for other nations.

Stephen
Reply to  Stephen
1 month ago

That’s why the Brits feel they are in it big time…with Peaty

Tea rec
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

I think Apple on anchor. Caeleb has 2 individuals that session

Togger
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Peaty and Guy in the heats? We really want this one.

Peaty presumably because Wilby swam earlier but they could have swum Murdoch.

Boomer
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

Yeah weird. Maybe they wanted to practise their changeovers too, it being different from a regular medley relay

Togger
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

Maybe, makes sense for Dawson to Peaty. But assuming they sub in Hopkin for the final, given Peaty’s handed over to Guy numerous times and Jimmy has the individual, why swim him given Peters isn’t far behind?

Probably feel burned by the men’s 4×100, but I think they did the right thing there.

Thomas Selig
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

I think Peaty was always going to swim this: Wilby’s had three rounds of both 100 and 200, and Murdoch’s not been on great form so far. I do think they’d ideally they’d have wanted to go Litchfield and Stephens/Jones instead of Dawson and Guy, particularly with the 100 fly heats very shortly before this. But Litchfield being badly off form has scuppered that (Stephens/Jones haven’t been great either), and Greenbank obviously is resting up ahead of the 200 final tomorrow, so no real choice. I suspect the heats of this being so close to the heats of the 100 fly is why they went with Guy instead of Peters: go for that extra experience.

CY~
Reply to  Thomas Selig
1 month ago

Yeah Guy has shown that he’s able to back it up. May actually be faster in his split than Peters’ flat start today 🤷🏻‍♀️

Dee
Reply to  Togger
1 month ago

Adam said he has felt cold in the medleys because he has such a big wait between them and the 100br in the past – Probably wanted the heats swims to get warmed up.

Thomas Selig
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Some interesting calls there: does Weitzel swimming mean that they’re thinking of going Dressel on free in the final? So Huske-Dressel as back-half? Surely if they were going F on free Weitzel would be straight in for the final, with Manuel/Brown/whoever in the heats? Smith-Andrew for first two legs or Murphy-Jacoby?

Tough doubles for Guy and Shields, about 20 minutes between 100 fly heats and mixed medley relay heats. I think GB would have liked to have gone Litchfield/Stephens for legs 1 and 3, but with neither at their best here probably didn’t want to risk it. Think they were always going to swim Peaty: Wilby’s just done three rounds of the 200 to go with his three 100s earlier,… Read more »

Sub13
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

I’m a bit shocked at Aus. ZSC makes sense. The fact that they don’t have Mitch in tells me they’re using him for the final. I assume they will use Emma and Cate as well?

I have no f***ing idea what the coaches are thinking.

M d e
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Nothing good. Our coaches have mismanaged everything they have had a chance too.

sepgup
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Wow for the US I didnt expect Wilson and Shields to swim this relay, I thought that they would really pick from these 8 swimmers:

Back: Murphy, Smith
Breast: Andrew, Jacoby
Fly: Dressel, Huske
Free: Weitzeil, Apple

Boomer
Reply to  sepgup
1 month ago

Probably don’t want to overload MA, he still has his indiv events and the medley relay. Dressel will probably still be in but swimming free instead. That’s my guess. Unless they plan on swimming Weitzeil twice, which is weird.

sepgup
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

That’s a good point especially since we don’t know if MA handles doubles well and that could hurt the team. But I think it’s a little weird because, in Swimswam’s preview, FMMF is almost 2 seconds faster than MFFM so I’m really curious for the finals lineup because they’re already going FMMF for prelims when I thought they would do that for finals. I do think you’re right especially in medleys the coaches wouldn’t swim someone in both prelims and finals to give others shots at medals too so this is interesting.

Pags
Reply to  Boomer
1 month ago

With a maximum of 3 heats of 50 free between his 50 semi-final and this event, I don’t see them swimming Micahel Andrew in the final. The time to swim his was today. I wonder if they offered it but he declined so he could rest for 200IM final in the morning?

Last edited 1 month ago by Pags
Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  sepgup
1 month ago

Maybe Zapple blew a gasket on that 800 free relay. Essentially the equivalent of Townley’s last 250 of his 500 free at NCAAs his senior year, from which he still hasn’t recovered.

Dee
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Seems an extremely tight turnaround for James Guy. Wouldn’t be shocked if he’s a no show

Bill G
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

CAN with: Acevedo-Mastromatteo-Savard-Smith (MMFF). Despite having two FINA 100m backstrokers on the men’s side, Aceveo was brought in as a relay-only swimmer. Canada would probably like to use Masse in the 100m back, but the 200m back prelims make it tough to do that.

Gen D
Reply to  Bill G
1 month ago

I thought they he was there for the 4×100 freestyle relay (he finished 4th at trials) but they didn’t use him there at all so maybe they had no choice to put him in this relay somewhere. He could surprise, who knows…

Bill G
Reply to  Gen D
1 month ago

Canada brought Acevedo to swim the mixed medley relay and then rested Mac Neil in the fly and Oleksiak/Sanchez in the free … without Mac Neil and the top freestylers they finished 13th out of 16 in the prelims. They likely had no chance to advance here with that relay lineup.

Bill G
Reply to  Gen D
1 month ago

Right – Acevedo was 4th at trials, but only after Hayden withdrew after prelims and Kisil withdrew with an arm injury right before the race. He was an emergency 4×100 free selection, I guesss.

Gen D
Reply to  Bill G
1 month ago

yeah, that was my impression. I guess they just threw in the towel for the 4×100 MMR. didn’t make sense otherwise to swim him backstroke when they already have two better backstrokers

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
1 month ago

Interested to see McIntosh’s 800.

She’s entered on an 8:29, but with her drops down to 1:55 and 4:02, you suspect she has more in store…

ice
1 month ago

Anyone knows who the AUS team captains are? Trying to figure out who’ll pep talk the team so that they can bounce right back

flicker
Reply to  ice
1 month ago

I think its Cate and Elijah?…

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  ice
1 month ago

Also if anyone has a video of Boxall when Titmus laid an egg on the leadoff off the 800 free relay, please share.

anonymous
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

Titmus is in Boxall’s :Lane of disappointment” next practice

Miss M
Reply to  ice
1 month ago

They have a leadership team. It was Cate & Bronte Campbell, Jess Hansen, Mitch Larkin and Alex Graham. Not sure whether it changed for 2021, but all 5 are still on the team …

M d e
1 month ago

Need Kaylee to wash the foul taste out of my mouth from last session.

Even Zac’s 11/10 swim and Kyles 10/10 are poisoned for me now.

Sub13
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

I can handle losing when someone else does better. I hate losing because of soemthing stupid. And that was stupid AF.

M d e
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Yeah exactly.

If we put mollie O in and had swam an order that made sense I would have been ok with the loss.

We had too many things other than winning the event effecting decision making.

Robbos
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

I feel exactly the same.
I mean I was all Chalmers today, he gave it everything, the whole race was what everyone expected, Dressel’s front end up against Chalmers back end. Great race & the best swimmer touched the wall first. I was gutted as an Aussie, but as a swim fan, great race & accept defeat.

The 4 x 200 pfft, poor coaching with arrogance.

Samesame
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

Zac made my day. And Kyle too. I’m trying to move on from the relay. Sigh

M d e
Reply to  Samesame
1 month ago

Zac and Kyle both did everything they possibly could have.

The relay was poo

Stephen
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

Arrogance is the word of the world today. Freely describing Aussies shocker.

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Why don’t you just go with Titmus choked on the leadoff then?

G Force
1 month ago

Watch my boy Joe Schooling silence his critics!

Streamliner69
Reply to  G Force
1 month ago

Yeah Bro! He got PISSED after not making it passed the heats and broke the world record in the warm up pool right after! But Bro he’s the best

M d e
1 month ago

Australian coverage replaying the 4×2 as if it was a success.

I actually feel sick again now.

That was the most embarrassing loss I’ve seen Australia have at an olympics. I never want to see that race again.

SNygans01
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

I think I’m with you there.
The exact opposite of (for example):

  • Thorpe swimming over the top of Gary Hall Jr in Sydney;
  • Cathy winning the 400 in Sydney;
  • Stephen Bradbury in 2002 (also because it is so funny).

Other Aust Olympic moments (non-swimming) that arguably rival the low of today’s 4×2:

  • Atlanta – Shane Kelly’s foot coming straight off his pedal at start of 1k time trial (when he had a win in the bag)
  • Sydney – Jane Saville getting DQ’d in the walk just as she was about to enter the Stadium (in front)
  • Montreal – Raelene Boyle DQ’d in 200 semi.

And in another post I mentioned the feeling of today… Read more »

M d e
Reply to  SNygans01
1 month ago

I think today is worse than the 4×1

This team was actually the ‘lock’ that the Australian media pretended that one was. Even after the bad decisions they needed everything to go wrong to lose, and then it did.

HAHA
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

LMFAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Sub13
1 month ago

Channel 7 are replaying the relay. Why!?

They’re also spinning it as “we broke the world record”. Presumably becuase Arnie is the golden girl right now and they absolutely do not want to suggest she might have stuffed up.

M d e
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

That doesn’t even make sense because she gets beaten straight up head to head.

Should just have put Zac on 3 times and Kyle 1 time instead

Pags
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

It’s going to be real interesting to see how Arnie performs in Paris after being the media darling of Ozland for the next 3 years. The weight of a nation’s expectations for repeat success on your shoulders can be crushing. Just ask Simone Biles, Missy Franklin, etc.

Swimfan
Reply to  Pags
1 month ago

Stephanie rice another name that comes to mind failed to win another medal 4 years after her triumph in Beijing

njones
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

Stephanie Rice didn’t ‘fail’ anything. She overcame incredible shoulder problems requiring multiple surgeries, trained in pain when she probably shouldn’t have, and somehow scraped her way into finals on a 2nd Olympic run. Very impressive regardless of the objective outcome.

Smith-Jacoby-Huske-Weitzeil
Reply to  Pags
1 month ago

Missy Franklin was diagnosed with bursitis and underwent double shoulder surgery.

One can out while on top like Maya DiRado after the Rio 2016 Olympics.

Last edited 1 month ago by Smith-Jacoby-Huske-Weitzeil
Mr Piano
Reply to  Pags
1 month ago

Ian Thorpe

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

Read More »