Penn’s Lia Thomas Breaks 200/500 Free Records in Meet with Princeton, Cornell

Penn University vs. Cornell University vs. Princeton University Tri-Meet

  • November 20, 2021
  • Sheerr Pool, Philadelphia, PA
  • SCY (25 yards)
  • Full Results (PDF)
  • Team Scores
    • Princeton 162-Penn 138
    • Penn 208.50-Cornell 91.50
    • Princeton 221-Cornell 78

Penn’s Lia Thomas blasted the number one 200 free time and the second-fastest 500 free time in the nation on Saturday, breaking Penn program records in both events. She swept the 100-200-500 free individual events and contributed to the first-place 400 free relay in a tri-meet against Princeton and Cornell in her home pool. Penn split for the day, beating Cornell 219 to 81 but losing to Princeton, 106 to 194.

Thomas began the day with a 1:43.47 (24.6/26.2/26.4/26.1) to win the 200 free. Only half a second off the NCAA A cut, it is the second-fastest women’s 200 free time in the nation so far this season, and it would have scored in the A final at 2021 NCAA Championships. She came to the wall 6.1 seconds ahead of her teammate, Bridget O’Leary (1:49.56). Next, Thomas clocked a 49.42 to win the 100 free with the only sub-50. She then went 4:35.06 to win the 500 free by 12.9 seconds, with Penn’s Anna Sofia Kalandadze finishing second in 4:47.93. Defending Ivy champ Ellie Marquardt of Princeton was third (4:48.64). Thomas wrapped up the day anchoring Penn’s 400 free relay with 49.01; the Quakers won by 2.4 seconds over Princeton with 3:22.70.

Kalandadze and teammate Grace Giddings went 1-2 in the 1000 free with 9:48.15 and 9:58.45. The Quakers also swept the top two slots in the 100 breast with Hannah Liu (1:02.37) and Isabella Pytel (1:02.87).

Penn women broke pool records in the 200 free, 500 free, 1000 free, 100 breast, and 400 free.

Thomas broke the Ivy records in the 200 free (previously 1:45.15, set by Harvard’s Samantha Shelton in 2019) and 500 free (previously 4:36.37, set by Princeton’s Marquardt in 2020).

Princeton went 1-2 in the 100 back with Margaux McDonald (55.10) edging teammate Alexa Pappas (55.79). In the 200 back, Nikki Venema (1:59.64) beat Tiger teammate Liza Whitmire (2:00.42) by eight-tenths. Pappas and teammate Jess Yeager were 1-2 in the 100 fly with 54.81 and 54.85. And Venema beat teammate Amelia Liu in the 50 free, 23.09 to 23.51.

Other Princeton wins went to Yeager in the 200 fly (1:58.95); Venema in the 200 IM (2:01.62), McDonald in the 200 breast (2:16.52), Maddie Seltzer in 1m diving, and Julia Fidanza on the 3m board. Princeton also won the 200 medley relay.

Cornell went 1-2 against Penn in the 50 free with Priscilla Wongso (23.69) and Melissa Parker (23.74). Also, in diving, the Big Red finished 1st and 2nd ahead of Penn (and were 2nd and 4th against Princeton) on both boards with Elise Jendritz and Demetra Williams.

Princeton swimmers set Sheerr Pool records in the 200 medley relay, 200 back, 200 IM, and 200 fly.

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Ivy Swim Fan
17 days ago

In 2015, the IOC ruled that transgender athletes who identify as female could compete on female teams if their testosterone levels were below ten nanomoles per liter for at least 12 months before the competition. In 2019, World Athletics lowered the maximum level to five nanomoles per liter. By comparison, most cisgender female athletes have testosterone levels between 0.12 and 1.79 nanomoles per liter.

There are no restrictions on transgender athletes who identify as men and want to compete on men’s teams.

Are there any such test done at IVY league for those dual meets? IVY championship?

Lol
Reply to  Ivy Swim Fan
16 days ago

Biology cannot be removed from this discussion. Simple testosterone levels are not sufficient.
There is a huge difference between men and women on average and most certainly at the fringes (elite) of competitive sport. It is not fair for the biological women to compete against biological men. Those spaces were protected for a reason.
Swim, perform or compete in whatever but gender transitioning can’t be allowed to remove the protected spaces set aside for the difference between the sexes.
The argument that testosterone levels create a parity of competition after transition shouldn’t hold up. Lia was not competing at this level in the mens division. It is clearly a massive advantage to compete as a woman and… Read more »

K Reeder
Reply to  Lol
7 days ago

Thomas’ lifetime best from last year would set American records in the 500, 1000 and 1650 freestyle. Katie Ledecky holds the records. Women’s category in sports must be protected for biological females, period.

Una-Jane Winfield
Reply to  Lol
7 days ago

“Women’s…. group competitions are protected”: actually under current IOC regulations they are NOT protected. Bring back chromosomal sex tests. In the balance of fairness and inclusion it is fairness which MUST be upheld. Transwomen can have a THIRD category if they want. #sexnotgender

Jim Butler
Reply to  Ivy Swim Fan
6 days ago

The NCAA rules for “a trans female (MTF)” is that they must be treated with testosterone suppression medication for 12 calendar months before competing in the women’s division. The NCAA rules do not require suppression of testosterone to a specific level. Here’s a link to the applicable NCAA handbook; the rule is on page 13 of the handbook: https://ncaaorg.s3.amazonaws.com/inclusion/lgbtq/INC_TransgenderHandbook.pdf.

J. Byrd
17 days ago

Waiting for the comments like…. *eats popcorn*

show me your data
Reply to  J. Byrd
17 days ago

The NCAA best womens time 200Fr is held by Torri Huske from.Friday night, certainly before this headline and spin were issued . Huske had a lot of swims. Friday she did a double both prelims and finals as well as 2 relay legs leadoff on both the Medley and 4×200. Her time was 1:42. You should be up to speed about her weekend of work, not these Ivy races.
As of the time Huske raced in GAC invite. she could claim Leading Times in 50, 100, and 200 FR, plus 100FL and 200IM. Pretty good weekend for her. Those times may have already been matched, or will be in next couple months, as everyone gets stronger and faster.
… Read more »

Last edited 17 days ago by show me your data
Tea rex
Reply to  show me your data
16 days ago

I’m glad the first angry comment was about the author missing a relay split from yesterday.
#swimnerds

Jackman
17 days ago

Is Thomas allowed to compete at Womens NCAAs?

heyyyhoooo
Reply to  Jackman
17 days ago

Thomas gonna beat Ledecky at US Trials lol

JKR
Reply to  heyyyhoooo
16 days ago

As long as Lia Thomas is happy. Who cares about women’s feelings and well being right?

Splasher
Reply to  JKR
5 days ago

Don’t forget the feelings of those who think Lia Thomas’s feelings are more important than the integrity of the sport we all love and devoted much of our lives to.

Hoosier Daddy
17 days ago

Doesn’t count!

swammer
Reply to  Hoosier Daddy
17 days ago

I mean I think it does until the NCAA says it doesn’t…

swammer
Reply to  swammer
15 days ago

people are misinterpreting this comment lol I mean I think the NCAA SHOULD say something, otherwise American records will be broken at NCAAs and I think it will be a much bigger/more public deal to try to take back a major record than to figure out some rules and address this situation early in the season.

female
17 days ago

Women’s swimmer should have some self respect and boycott every event with Lia Thomas.

JKR
Reply to  female
16 days ago

Female swimmers probably scared especially at Ivies. Some trans activists are vile as hell. Doxing and rape threats to women.

heyyyhoooo
17 days ago

What’s the rules and regulation for Lia Thomas to switch from men’s team to women’s team?

Jim Butler
Reply to  heyyyhoooo
6 days ago

The NCAA rules for “a trans female (MTF)” is that they must be treated with testosterone suppression medication for 12 calendar months before competing in the women’s division. The NCAA rules do not require suppression of testosterone to a specific level. Here’s a link to the applicable NCAA handbook; the rule is on page 13 of the handbook: https://ncaaorg.s3.amazonaws.com/inclusion/lgbtq/INC_TransgenderHandbook.pdf.

Distance Per Stroke
17 days ago

A 1:43 for women is about a 1:32 for men. They’re best time before was a 1:39.

jack
Reply to  Distance Per Stroke
17 days ago

And?

Distance Per Stroke
Reply to  jack
16 days ago

And you think it’s normal for a senior to just naturally have a 7 second drop in a 200?

BearlyBreathing
17 days ago

I would like to know what the old records were.

BearlyBreathing
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
16 days ago

I looked them up:
200 Free 1:45.69 Shelby Fortin 2014
500 Free 4:41.34 Shelby Fortin 2013

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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