Australian Women Collect Olympic Gold With 3:29.69 4×100 Freestyle World Record

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

The Australian women have done it. During the first finals session at the Tokyo 2020 Games, Bronte Campbell, Meg Harris, Emma McKeon, and Cate Campbell have downed the women’s 4×100 freestyle world record, collecting gold in a 3:29.69.

That swim is an improvement upon the nation’s former mark of 3:30.05 which they set at the 2018 Commonwealth Games. That record was established by Shayna Jack, Bronte Campbell, Emma McKeon, and Cate Campbell for gold in 2018.

Split Comparison

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games 2018 Commonwealth Games
100 Bronte Campbell (53.01) Shayna Jack (54.03)
200 Meg Harris (53.09) Bronte Campbell (52.03)
300 Emma McKeon (51.35) Emma McKeon (52.99)
400 Cate Campbell (52.34) Cate Campbell (51.00)

In addition to improving upon their own world record in the event, the Australian women have successfully defended their Olympic title from 2016. In fact, 3/4 of the women who took gold in Rio were present during the 2020 final in Bronte Campbell, Cate Campbell, and Emma McKeon while Meg Harris replaced 2016 Olympic medalist Brittany Elmslie. The Australian women won the 2016 title in a 3:30.65 which was an Olympic record at the time meaning that the new world record of 3:29.69 is also an Olympic record.

Further, since Australia held the previous world record at a 3:30.05, this swim represents a new Australian and Oceanian record in the event. While a world record is an incredible feat in any circumstance, Emma McKeon made her contribution event more impressive by splitting a 51.35 as the 3rd leg in the race.

Joining Australia on the Olympic podium, the Canadian women swam a 3:32.78 for the silver medal, while the Americans rounded out the top 3 in a 3:32.81. That’s a swapped result from the 2016 Olympic Games when the USA took silver to Australia in a 3:31.89 while Canada was bronze in a 3:32.89.

Canadian Silver Medal-Winning Splits

USA Bronze Medal-Winning Splits

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Relay Enthusiast
2 months ago

I honestly thought they’d go 3:28

MTK
Reply to  Relay Enthusiast
2 months ago

They would’ve with the C1 classic split of 51.0-51.5, instead of 52.3.

Troyy
Reply to  MTK
2 months ago

Harris also slower than you’d think after trials.

USAofYAY
2 months ago

Let’s take a minute to celebrate that the United States featured 2 black athletes on their bronze medal 400 FR relay! Huge step forward for the sport!

Saw Guerra
Reply to  USAofYAY
2 months ago

What about the other ladies on the relay? Do they take a backseat because of their skin color? The relay featured 4 amazing American women.

seetheworldswim
Reply to  USAofYAY
2 months ago

Why are people so obsessed with race?
It shouldn’t matter if their white or black, should mean the same

Last edited 2 months ago by seetheworldswim
TheJudga
Reply to  seetheworldswim
2 months ago

It should mean the same, but historically it hasn’t… Duh.

So, it is important to recognize the milestones that have been made towards equality in a sport that isn’t known for being particularly diverse.

Diversity in success is important for inspiring other athletes that have even greater odds against themselves due to their predispositioned disadvantage stemming from lack of privilege.

Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
Reply to  TheJudga
2 months ago

On the diversity point obvs Tunisia (and therefore Africa) got a gold on day 1, so pretty cool to see golds coming from 4 different continents on the first day!

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
2 months ago

tomorrow europe will get a gold with peaty/kamminga, maybe sjostrom and roc

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Chalmers
maverick1993
Reply to  seetheworldswim
2 months ago

The reason why people point it out is cause of people like you. Yes, it does not matter in an ideal world. the world we live in and have lived in has been far from ideal and so it is important to celebrate these feats,

Yozhik
Reply to  seetheworldswim
2 months ago

They are exactly those people who whenever a black athlete succeeds immediately remind this person: don’t forget that you are BLACK.

AussiePerson
Reply to  seetheworldswim
2 months ago

Why can’t you just let the black swimmers have their moment?

Sam B
Reply to  seetheworldswim
2 months ago

that’s what the widow said at the funeral

Corn Pop
Reply to  USAofYAY
2 months ago

Australia has had 2 actual Africans in the relay for years.

Last edited 2 months ago by Corn Pop
Verram
Reply to  Corn Pop
2 months ago

Wrong skin colour to get recognised apparently

Breezeway
Reply to  USAofYAY
2 months ago

Do you not realize some of these people would rather go without a medal than have Manuel/Hinds contribute to a medal winning relay or individual event

cynthia curran
Reply to  USAofYAY
2 months ago

Asian background is not considered a big deal, but in the state of Washington, California, and Hawaii Asians are a much higher percentage of the population than are Afro-Americans. In both California and Texas Latinos also outnumber Afro-Americans by huge margins. In fact Afro-Americans are the 2nd largest group back east but not in the west. You think of Track and Field where Afro-Americans dominate sprints. What happens if swimming goes more Latino or Asian.

Yup
2 months ago

Cate Campbell 1.3 seconds slower than 2018?

Verram
2 months ago

Even though they were mega favourites they still had to execute on the day so well done Aussies!!

seetheworldswim
2 months ago

The fact that the morning relay team of AUS would won the final just shows how dominant Australia is!

Relay Enthusiast
2 months ago

So disappointed for GB women.

Anna Hopkin 53.16 lifetime best. Great lead off leg.

Abbie Wood who is a 200 IM, 200 Breast swimmer split 53.23 on 100 free. Swam out of her skin.

Lucy Hope is the main disappointment. She swam 53.89 flat start in May so if she was at her best we’d expect 53.6 split. Instead she split 54.73. She’ll be very disappointed.

Freya was decent on the anchor leg. She should be going 52.5 splits but clearly ain’t on her best form.

All in all GB finished 1.1 seconds out of the medals because Lucy Hope swam 1.1 seconds outside her best and Freya was maybe slightly outside it too.

Dressel will come 3rd in 100 free
Reply to  Relay Enthusiast
2 months ago

I was a bit disappointed in the sense we *could* (emphasis on could) have potentially nabbed 3 bronzes had everything gone our way. However, at the end of the day they were all outside medal hopes. Even though day 1 didn’t go how I expected, it’s actually pretty spread out, with 4 golds going to 4 different countries, so hopefully it will be equally spread out over the days to come.

On GB’s chances, I really think Abbie Wood is going to do something special – probably in the 200IM. That’s not me pegging her for gold, but she does look like she’s on form. Peaty not as dominant as usual, but hopefully he can get the job done tomorrow.

Gogo bibi
2 months ago

I screamed when I saw a sub 3.30

Last edited 2 months ago by Gogo bibi
Yozhik
2 months ago

0.26sec (!). That is the difference in reaction time between Manuel and Oleksjak.
0.03 sec is the difference between silver and bronze Olympic medals.
When will it become clear to coaches that a relay exchange is the essential part of this kind of swimming competition?

Gaby
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

Where can I find the LIVE results with relay splits, etc. thank you in advance.

Yozhik
Reply to  Gaby
2 months ago

Just follow the link provided by Swimswim at the beginning of the article.

Gaby
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

Could not agree more.

Kgaucho
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

It was a clear difference watching it live … love Simone but her relay exchange was age-group level. She got left in the blocks