Watch the Turn That May Have Swung the 2021 ISL Title (Lilly King DQ Video)

2021 INTERNATIONAL SWIMMING LEAGUE – SEASON 3, MATCH 18 – LEAGUE FINAL

The replay of match day 1 of the 2021 International Swimming League grand finale is up.

On a day of big swims from the likes of Nic Fink and Kelsi Dahlia, a disqualification of the Cali Condors’ women’s 400 medley relay at the end of the session halted the momentum for the defending champions.

The call was a non-simultaneous touch for breaststroker Lilly King on the 3rd turn of her leg of the medley relay.

While the ISL does have an underwater camera for the livestream, on the replay, only one view is available – an overhead view.

A few things to point out:

  1. The official in question is in good position to make the call, right over King.
  2. The video is definitely not conclusive at this angle, and the official has a much better view.
  3. There is clearly a flex in King’s left hand going into the turn that *could* mean a non-simultaneous touch. That’s sort of what King eventually admitted had happened in the 200 breaststroke at the 2019 World Championships, though she also acknowledged that the call would have been really hard to make in real time.

Watch the turn below. King is on the left side of the screen, in the lead.

Note: there has been some conversation that Bernie Guenther might have said “long turn” and been referring to Beata Nelson on the original broadcast discussing the disqualification. Upon rewatch, Guenther says “wrong turn” and clearly refers to King, not Nelson. That is then backed up in the post-match show, where Guenther, Rowdy Gaines, and Mark Foster spend a few minutes clearly watching King’s turn and analyzing that they couldn’t see an issue.

The Condors easily touched the wall first, and the disqualification meant a 50 point swing at the top of the table.

Standings after Day 1 of the Final:

  1. Energy Standard – 271
  2. Cali Condors – 250
  3. London Roar – 206
  4. LA Current – 171

 

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Swim like fish drink like fish
1 month ago

Terrible call. Who has the underwater footage?

Taa
1 month ago

At race speed it looked a little suspect but then I watched the others and they all look the same to me.

Sub13
1 month ago

She clearly pulls one hand away before the other but the touch itself seems very clearly simultaneous.

Of all the actual rules they could be enforcing they chose an odd one for a DQ

Wow
1 month ago

From what I’ve seen, she touches with both hands. There’s a slight jerk with the one hand as it bounces right off toward the push-off but they both initially touched simultaneously . I don’t agree with the call as it should be overturned. I’d be a shame for a call like this to determine a championship.

Last edited 1 month ago by Wow
Sharkspeed
1 month ago

I don’t think we can take conclusions with this camera angle. It’s impossible to see the touch

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Sharkspeed
1 month ago

Tough to think the video gives a better view than the judge literally standing right over her hands.

Troyy
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

This is true but they think it’s a conspiracy to give Energy the win.

Jero
1 month ago

I honestly don’t see a dq

The unoriginal Tim
1 month ago

Not a good angle to see exactly what happened. Touch appears simultaneous but there are additional rules about the hands being level and we can’t see that. The video does show that this turn had no impact on the result and so it is very unfortunate that it has affected the reults of the match so far to a significant degree.

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

Thank you. I find that interesting as I have been DQ’d for my hands not being level at a low level event (a long time ago when I still had good knees and swam satan’s stroke).

Last edited 1 month ago by The unoriginal Tim
The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

I don’t know if it changed but at the time my coach believed the DQ to be legit. A few years later another coach mentioned this rule with enough certainty that I assumed it must exist.

Wahooswimfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

They had to be level in the 60s and early 70s.

Eagleswim
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

On Brett hawke’s Instagram Tom shields talks about how officials call it sometimes even though it’s not the rule

Aquaman
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

The problem is judges have a hard time seeing the 2 hands one above the other and tend to call a one hand touch. This is a preferred approach as it sets up the turn better but you never know who’s watching and there is a higher risk they’ll DW you unfortunately

Aquaman
Reply to  Aquaman
1 month ago

DQ

Swammer
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

I believe the rule is that the arms need to be in the same plane as each other, and parallel to the plane of the water during the swim, but somehow, it is OK for the hands to be not level during the touch on the wall. Not sure how it is possible to have the arms in the same plane up until the moment of the touch.

Also, in a relativistic physics sense, no two actions ever are completely “simultaneous”, so “simultaneous” touch has to mean “appearing simultaneous in real time to a normal human viewer”, or some-such.

Troyyy
1 month ago

Everyone thought King’s touch in the 200 at Gwangju was legal based on above water replay as well. Everyone was outraged and adamant the call was wrong but at the end of the day it proved to be correct. You can see the underwater replay for that one here: https://www.nbcsports.com/video/2019-world-swimming-championships-lilly-king-disqualified-200m-breast

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyyy
Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Troyyy
1 month ago

On SwimSwam, we hate facts.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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