Ultra Swim Swimmer of the Month: Caeleb Dressel, Cali Condors

Ultra Swim Swimmer of the Month is a recurring SwimSwam feature shedding light on a U.S.-based swimmer who has proven themselves over the past month. As with any item of recognition, Swimmer of the Month is a subjective exercise meant to highlight one athlete whose work holds noteworthy context – perhaps a swimmer who was visibly outperforming other swimmers over the month, or one whose accomplishments slipped through the cracks among other high-profile swims. If your favorite athlete wasn’t selected, feel free to respectfully recognize them in our comment section.

Caeleb Dressel got consistently better as the ISL’s 2020 season went on. And he closed with a stellar month of November, breaking four world records in short course meters.

In the ISL semifinals, Dressel went 49.88 in the 100 IM, becoming the first man ever under 50 seconds.

And in the ISL final, Dressel broke three world records. He lowered his 100 IM world mark to 49.28, going almost a full second faster than anyone else in history. He also became the first man ever under 48 in the 100 fly, blasting a 47.78 world record. And he broke his own 50 free world record in 20.16.

Dressel currently holds 7 world records, more than any other swimmer on the world record books as of today. Here are his world records in all meters courses:

  • LC 100 fly
  • LC mixed 4×100 free relay
  • SC 50 free
  • SC 100 fly
  • SC 100 IM
  • SC 4×100 free relay
  • SC Mixed 4×50 free relay

Dressel also holds 4 long course American records, 8 short course meters American records, and 4 short course yards American records.

 

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Joe
1 month ago

Who’d have thought? 🙂

I wonder what’s the most WRs any person held at one time (counting LCM and SCM)? Just before Rome 2009, MP held 8 WRs, all in LCM (all his Beijing gold medal events). Katinka Hosszu maxed out at 7 WRs (and all individual events to boot): 200, 400 IM in LCM, then 100, 200, 400 IM, 100, 200 back in SCM.

Jack
Reply to  Joe
1 month ago

Lol. It is a little like, “Hey guess what? The swimmer of the month for August 2008 is…hang on, let me check my notes…Michael Phelps!”

Jack
Reply to  Joe
1 month ago

I think Phelps held 9 at one time. After Rome, he had 7 because Beiderman broke the 200 free. But then in December of 2009, he was on relays that broke the short course 4×100 free and 4×100 medley records. So unless I’m missing something, he held 9 from then until Lochte broke the 200 IM.

Last edited 1 month ago by Jack
Joe
Reply to  Jack
1 month ago

Lochte broke the 200 IM WR in Rome with 1:54.10.

Funny that Phelps has the four Olympic golds, but Lochte has the two fastest times.

Mr Piano
Reply to  Joe
1 month ago

And there’s a reason Phelps has the Olympic record as well.

Doing 2 400 IMs, 100 free, 4×200 frees, 3×200 flys, and heats and semis of the 200 IM and heats of the 100 fly, to still be able to swim a 1:54.2 is pretty insane.

Jack
Reply to  Joe
1 month ago

Oh you’re right! I had forgotten that Lochte broke it before he went 1:54.00

Swimfan
1 month ago

So you’re telling me… Caeleb is fast??

Mclovin
1 month ago

So he has 5 real World Records. Sorry but for a fair comparison mixed relays shouldnt be count

John
Reply to  Mclovin
1 month ago

ok Grampa, and I bet you think the ladies should stick to 800m as well and not damage their fragile constitution?

Thezwimmer
Reply to  John
1 month ago

Not a fair comparison. Women have been doing the 1500 and men the 800 for many decades, just not at the olympics. Mixed Relays have only come into fashion within the last decade

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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