SwimSwam’s Top 100 for 2021: Women’s #30-21

The Olympic year is here. Again. Maybe. And we’re kicking off the year 2021 with a countdown of the top 100 women and top 100 men in world-level swimming heading into the Olympic year.

Who are the top 100 male and female swimmers you need to know about, you need to watch, with the biggest event in swimming less than 6 months away.

We’ll break down the list into multiple installments, so stay tuned as we continue with our lists.

We’ve placed a heavy priority on individual Olympic medal potential and world record potential, but we’ve also weighed potential for impact at other world-level events like Short Course Worlds, the ISL season, and the World Cup. These lists are, by nature, subjective. If you disagree, leave your thoughts/ranks in the comments.

See also:

WOMEN’S #30 – #21

#30: Sarah Köhler, Germany  – In a Katie Ledecky-less 1500 free final (she scratched due to illness) Köhler won the silver medal at 2019 Worlds, going a new German record time of 15:48.83. In the 800 free, Köhler was less than a second away from the podium in the 800 free at 2019 Worlds, going 8:16.43 in the final to set a new German record. Köhler is definitely a medal threat, and silver medal, at that, in both the 800 and 1500 free. There are a lot of great distance swimmers on this list, but as we approach our top 20, we’re starting to see swimmers who are in great positions to nab medals, even with talents like Ledecky and Ariarne Titmus ahead.

#29: Li Bingjie, China – Li was a huge spark in her debut days, then faded a bit, but has looked better since that plateau. She was the 800 free silver medalist at 2017 Worlds, dropping a massive 8:15.46, and she took bronze there in the 400 free. Li is still just 18, and while she’s only been 8:27 since summer 2018 in the 800, she nearly matched her best in the 400 with a 4:03.29 at the 2019 Pro Swim Series – Des Moines. In the 1500 free, Li has been 15:53.80 from the 2018 Asian Games.

#28: Ranomi Kromowidjojo, Netherlands – Kromowidjojo has had a stellar career, and she’s not done yet. The 2012 Olympic champion in the 50 free and 100 free has won four Olympic medals, three of them gold, and she’s won a medal at every long course World Championships since 2007. At 2017 and 2019 Worlds, she showed her versatility with silver medals in the 50 fly, and 2017 Worlds were the biggest medal haul for her, as she took home four. During the 2019 ISL season, Kromowidjojo went undefeated in the skins races and won the 50 free once, and in 2020, she was the fastest 50 flyer in the league and the #2 50 freestyler.

#27: Sarah Sjöström, Sweden – It’s extremely difficult to predict what kind of form Sjöström will be in in Tokyo after she fell on ice and had to get surgery for a broken elbow just a week ago. On the one hand, she’s an otherwordly athlete with a world-class medical and strength team on her side. On the other, she broke her elbow, and Swedish team doctor Rene Tour said there would be 3, maybe 4 months until she can be back to regular training. It seems very possible that she can return to *some* training in the near future, though. And as someone who can drop ridiculous sprint times at a championship or during the off-season, it’s hard to doubt Sjöström. While she was starting to lose grip of her 100 fly stronghold at international competitions, she still looked like a gold medal threat in that race as well as the 50/100/200 free; post-incident, we’d like to think she could get back to 24-low and podium-level speed in the 50 free, at the very least, by the summer.

#26: Suzuka Hasegawa, Japan – Hasegawa is a very exciting young talent in the 200 fly, an event that has not had a clear world #1 for years. She set the World Junior record in the 200 fly in 2017, dropping a big 2:06.29 at 17 years of age. Since 2018 summer, Hasegawa was in a bit of slump, her best between summer 2018 and spring 2020 only a 2:07.21. But then, last summer at the Tokyo Special Tournament in late August, Hasegawa took aim and fired a 2:05.62. That makes her the fastest 200 butterflier in the world since 2018, a huge jump after she wasn’t fast enough to even make the final at 2019 Worlds. She also hit a new best 57.49 in the 100 fly at that meet in August, and while she hasn’t shown her top speed at a long course Worlds or Olympics, she has the speed to surprise for a gold in the 200. In SCM, Hasegawa is also dangerous; she was the #1 ISL swimmer last season (2:03.12) and her 2:02.96 from 2017 is the Japanese record.

#25: Hali Flickinger, USA – Another great 200 fly standout, Flickinger has been pretty consistent for years. She won bronze in the 200 fly at 2015 World University Games, then progressed to the Olympic stage, where she placed seventh in the final. In 2017, she earned her first major medal as part of Team USA’s 4×200 free relay with a prelims swim, then she won her first major individual medal at 2018 Pan Pacs, taking gold in the 200 fly. In 2019, she was 2:05.9 in prelims at Worlds, but then gained in semis and finals and wound up with the silver by less than two-tenths behind Boglarka Kapas. Flickinger is a gold medal contender in the 200 fly in Tokyo with proven speed at major meets, though, and she’s an extremely valuable SCM competitor. Flickinger was #2 in the ISL in the 200 fly last season, while she showed her versatility with the #4 time in both the 400 free and 400 IM.

#24: Annie Lazor, USA – In May 2019, Lazor put the world on notice with a 2:20.77 in the long course 200 breast at the Pro Swim Series – Bloomington. Not even Lilly King has been that fast, ever. Lazor is the #9 performer in this event in history, and the only active swimmer who has been faster than her is Russian gold medal favorite Yulia Efimova. That summer, Lazor went on to win Pan Ams gold in the 200 breast (2:21.40) and break the meet record by three seconds, while also winning the 100 breast (1:06.94). Lazor was 1:06.5/2:21.6 in March 2020 right before the pandemic, and she was 1:06.0 in the 100 when she hit her 2:20. Lazor is looking really good to make the Team USA in both breaststrokes, and she’s at medal speed in both breast events with Olympic title potential in the 200.

#23: Wang Jianjiahe, China – Wang heads into the Tokyo Olympic year with a bronze medal in the 1500 free at the 2019 World Championships, while she won the 2018 World SC Champs gold in the 800 free by over four seconds. In spring 2019, Wang became the #3 performer ever in the 800 free (8:14.64), and she’s been very dangerous recently. In September 2020, she set a new Asian continental record in the 1500 free, going 15:45.59, a time that would’ve won silver at Worlds. Going off of her lifetime bests, including one just this past fall, she’s in great position for Tokyo.

#22: Boglarka Kapas, Hungary – Kapas surprised Hali Flickinger for the 200 fly title at 2019 Worlds, effectively making the Hungarian a Tokyo threat in a new event after already being a world-class distance freestyler. Kapas, 27, won the 800 free bronze in Rio in 2016, and she even won bronze in the 1500 free back at 2015 Worlds. The 2018 European champion in the 400/800/1500 free, Kapas was a complete non-factor in the 800 in Gwangju despite her 200 fly power, while she was the fifth-place finisher in the 400 free. If she can figure out how to be at her top form in both the distance free and 200 fly, she’s a huge threat.

#21: Sydney Pickrem, Canada – Pickrem is one of the premier IM talents in the world. She won the 200 IM bronze at 2019 Worlds, and she touched fourth in the 400 IM there, too. The year prior, she was the silver medalist in the 200 IM at Pan Pacs. In 2017, she won 400 IM bronze at Worlds in Budapest. Her 200 IM best is from 2019 (2:08.61), but her 400 IM best is from back in 2017, a lethal 4:32.88. That said, she looked phenomenal during the 2020 ISL season. She was #2 in the league in both IMs, right on Yui Ohashi’s heels, and hit lifetime bests 2:04.00 in the 200 and 4:23.68 in the 400, both Canadian records. Pickrem also has a third event with medal potential: the 200 breast. She boasts a 2:22.63 from 2019’s Canadian Worlds Trials, while she was 2:17.75 during the ISL season for the #4 time of the league and a personal best.

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Hswimmer
7 months ago

Sjostrom should be top 5. Wtf?

2Fat4Speed
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

Factor in that current broken elbow…

Hswimmer
Reply to  2Fat4Speed
7 months ago

That doesn’t affect anything she has previously accomplished

reederrabbit
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

but this isnt a backward looking list. I guess you think Phelps should still be #1 on the men’s list?

Hswimmer
Reply to  reederrabbit
7 months ago

I think he would still be 2 behind Dressel.

Njones
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

The list is not an all time list but a future performances ranking. I would agree with the Sarah at 5 with asterisk though, too early to see actual effect of injury.

Khachaturian
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

Quite the hot take

Joe
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

Obviously her injury accident had a massive knock on this ranking. As the article notes, it’s really difficult to predict the impact of the surgery.

Personally, I’d probably have kept her ranking as it was pre-injury (i.e. somewhere in the top 5), but just put a huge asterisk acknowledging the broken elbow.

tea rex
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

Karl, assuming this list was started before her injury, can you tell us where Sjostrom was originally ranked? I’d have put her #2, because only a very few swimmers can compete for gold in 3 or more individual events.

Admin
Reply to  tea rex
7 months ago

Originally we had her back and for between 2 and 3, weighing the impact of her back injury.

Coach
7 months ago

If I’m drafting a team to compete for medals in Tokyo, I pick Sjostrom way ahead of the 27th pick in the draft.

Dee
7 months ago

I know she’s a World Champ, but Kapas at 22 raised an eyebrow for me. The 200fl looks to be potentially moving on again after some regression as an event, and her distance free hasn’t really been at the races for a while.

AnEn
Reply to  Dee
7 months ago

I think you should name the athletes you would rank ahead of her. I don’t really think you could justify ranking her any lower, personally i would have had probably had her top 20.
I am not sure you can justify ranking anyone except C. Campbell/Sjöstrom/Manuel/McKeon/Pellegrini/Titmus/Ledecky/King/Efimova/Pickrem/Hosszu/Ye Shiwen/Margalis/MacNeil/R. Smith/Masse/Atherton/Baker/McKeown/Köhler/Smith/Quadarella/Wang Jianjiahe ahead of her. Personally i wouldn’t ranking anyone ahead of her who
a) Can’t win more than 1 individual medal or
b) Can realistically win gold and is the current world champion

AnEn
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Sorry, this post was unclear. I don’t think you can justify ranking her lower than 24th and i would probably rank her top 20. I don’t think ranking her 22nd is a “reach”.

Dee
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

I see four women between 23-28 (Lazor, Flickinger, Sjostrom & Hasegawa) alone that I feel have a better chance of winning a medal than Kapas. There were also quite a few ranked 31-40 imo. I can see the justification for putting her as high as 22, but I see more chance that Kapas misses the medals than wins one in Tokyo.

have a nice day y'all!
Reply to  Dee
7 months ago

after rio she felt unmotivated in the free events, you could easily see that even if she didn’t mention it in interviews (I am Hungarian and a huge fan of her, so I try to keep up with her career). that’s why she and her coach started to compete in 400 IM and 200 fly to make the trainings more challenging to her and even after becomig a european champion her coach focused more on the free events because her fly time wasn’t too impressive. they decided to see if 200 fly was the right choice for her after 2019 WC, where she went for PB and a medal and after focusing more on the fly (but still only 50%… Read more »

SCCOACH
7 months ago

Yeah I’m putting Sjostrom probably just inside the top 10 even with the elbow

Hswimmer
Reply to  SCCOACH
7 months ago

Right!

AnEn
7 months ago

Pickrem and Köhler are both ranked too low. Ranking Köhler lower than Kromowidjojo is absurd, she has no medal chance and might very well struggle to make any final. Ranking Köhler lower than Wang and Li is also a weird choice, given that they compete in the same events as Köhler but were beaten by her at the last worlds. I understand the reasoning behind ranking Hasegawa, Flickinger and Lazor ahead of Köhler (they could realistically win gold, unlike her), but should someone really be ranked higher just for having a better gold medal chance in one event (without having any proof that they are actually capable to win gold) while an other athlete has a realistic chance to win… Read more »

Hswimmer
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Lazor shouldn’t even be ranked that high IMO

AnEn
Reply to  Hswimmer
7 months ago

Now that i think about it, you might be right for the following reasons:
1) Why would you rank her that high for having a gold medal chance while ranking other swimmers who have a gold medal chance in multiple events (Margalis) or have actually proven that they can compete for gold (Flickinger) lower.
2) (Not sure this reason his any relevance) How likely is she even to qualify, given the depth of the US in this event?

WesternEasternGermany
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

I get the sense, that like all good Germans, you become hyper-fixated on one thing, and struggle to see areas of gray. Culturally, this explains a lot of your reasoning.

“She might not make the team, therefore because I’m hyper-focused on Olympic medals, I think she ranks lower.”

You need to blend everything together, though. A swimmer who might not make the U.S. Olympic team, but might win a medal if she does, probably gets downgraded as compared to being, say, Hungarian, but that doesn’t mean she should be moved off the page entirely.

Life is a spectrum, sir.

AnEn
Reply to  WesternEasternGermany
7 months ago

Normally i wouldn’t discuss with someone who
a) Creates a “psychological profile” for a person without ever having talked to that person and without knowing anything about that person (including his/her nationality)
b) Thinks that all person from one country have the same “mental constitution”

I will make an exception for you and answer to the point you were trying to make:
My argument indeed is mostly relevant for a possible year end ranking and not for this ranking. It doesn’t matter for the current ranking of swimmers how likely they are to make the olympic team. It certainly matters for a possible year end ranking in the sense that you then have to ask yourself who… Read more »

AnEn
7 months ago

Would like to know why Atherton, Baker and especially Haughey are ranked ahead of Köhler for example. I think they are all less likely to win a medal. Zhang Yufei is also debatable. Obviously she has amazing times and seems like a gold medal contender, but personally i don’t trust chinese swimmers to repeat their crazy times at worlds/olympics.
I can only come up with 19 of the 20 remaining swimmers, who am i missing?
Haughey
Atherton
Baker
Zhang Yufei
Masse
Pellegrini
McKeon
MacNeil
C. Campbell
Quadarella
Efimova
Manuel
Titmus
Ye Shiwen
King
McKeown
Ledecky
R. Smith
Hosszu

Hswimmer
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Now that list I agree on hopefully not in order tho

DistanceSwimmer
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Ye Shiwen? She still swims?

Troyy
Reply to  DistanceSwimmer
7 months ago

Silver in each of 200 and 400 im at Gwangju while you weren’t paying attention.

PeatyPiper
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Has Alys Thomas been on the list at all? I’m not saying she’s top 20, but if she could get near her 2018 time in 200 fly she would be a medal favourite.

Admin
Reply to  PeatyPiper
7 months ago

The problem is that she hasn’t been near her 2018 time. Ever. Her second-best swim ever is a 2:07.40.

https://www.swimrankings.net/index.php?page=athleteDetail&athleteId=4211090&styleId=17

At ISL in 2019, she swam a 2:09 in the 200 fly – in short course.

We discussed Alys, she was on our considerations list, but we just couldn’t find any indication that she was going to get back to that time at almost 31 years old.

PeatyPiper
Reply to  Braden Keith
7 months ago

Yes, a very fair assessment! I agree it was a bit of a wonder swim at the time!

Admin
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Check the IM medals at the last two World Championships.

AnEn
Reply to  Braden Keith
7 months ago

So Ohashi? If so, then i don’t see why she should be ranked that high. I think Köhler for example should be ranked ahead of her. I don’t even consider Ohashi a medal favorite vs. Hosszu/Ye Shiwen/Margalis/Pickrem.

Hswimmer
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

I hope Alex walsh is somewhere with that 2:09 low. Just hasn’t made it internationally quite yet

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Ohashi is definitely a favorite over Margalis in the IMs. What makes you think Ohashi won’t earn a medal? She has at 2017 and 2019 Worlds, she looks as good as ever, and is swimming at home.

AnEn
Reply to  SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
7 months ago

To be honest i can’t argue with you when you only look at the facts (times/results at worlds), but personally i just think that Margalis (in a typical fashion for american swimmers) will drop more time than Ohashi at the olympics. Hosszu and Ye Shiwen beat her most recently and have better PB’s. I would also rate McKeown (if she competes) and Pickrem (in the 200 IM) higher than her.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Fair enough, I am counting on the Japanese home field advantage to supersede any typical American drops. McKeown is definitely a wild card in the IMs.

Taa
Reply to  AnEn
7 months ago

Solid effort. I don’t like Efimova really at this point she probably can win Instagram. I think you missed the Japanese swimmer

PeatyPiper
7 months ago

Wattel just went 53.40 at Manchester intl…

PeatyPiper
Reply to  PeatyPiper
7 months ago

And a 2:09.38 from Abbie Wood!

AnEn
Reply to  PeatyPiper
7 months ago

Cool … France has a nice relay, they could be favorite for 4th place by now (ahead of the Netherlands).

Mr Piano
7 months ago

I’m sorry, but even with a broken elbow, Sarah shouldn’t be behind Flickinger

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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