See Unofficial Entry Lists For The 2019 World Championships Here

2019 FINA WORLD AQUATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

  • All sports: Friday, July 12 – Sunday, July 28, 2019
  • Pool swimming: Sunday, July 21 – Sunday, July 28, 2019
  • The Nambu University Municipal Aquatics Center, Gwangju, Korea
  • Meet site
  • FinaTV Live Stream
  • Live results

The 2019 World Championships begin in Gwangju, Korea today, though pool swimming is still another nine days away from its first session. But SwimSwam has obtained an early copy of entry lists for all events this month.

The start lists don’t have entry times listed, and there are probably changes still coming on these lists, which aren’t necessarily final. But they do give us our first glimpse at what the fields will look like in each of the 42 pool swimming events.

Bear with us, as most of the headings were quickly translated from their original Korean. If you see an error, please let us know and we’ll run back through to double-check our translations:

 

All Aquatics Disciplines

You can see the full sheet with entries in all aquatics disciplines (swimming, diving, high diving, water polo, artistic swimming and open water swimming) here. Entries for the new beach water polo event are not included.

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Dee

Duncan Scott going for the 200IM by the looks of things, and Tom Dean getting the 2nd spot ahead of 2017 4th place finisher Max Litchfield.

Brownish

Men’s 100 freestyle is women’s.

specatorn

missing Men’s 100 free?

Brownish

At the moment yes, but we’ve two women’s 🙂

torchbearer

Australia can qualify 4 women for the 100m races….:)

Francisco Chaparro

Yeah, is the new trend

CT Swim Fan

I can’t move the list much beyond what is showing on the screen already. Is there a trick to it?

CT Swim Fan

It’s fixed!

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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