Entry Lists For 2022 Short Course World Championships Released

2022 FINA SHORT COURSE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

The official entry lists for the 2022 Short Course World Championships have dropped.

The event, set to kick off next Tuesday in Melbourne, Australia, is loaded with a stacked field of swimmers and will feature some must-see matchups over six days of racing from Dec. 13-18.

The event entries for the U.S. athletes has been known since mid-October (though things have shifted a few times), but the psych sheets reveal what the other top athletes, including the stacked 36-member Australian team, will be swimming.

Highlighting the Aussie team is triple Olympic gold medalist and 2022 world champion Kaylee McKeown, who is set to race the women’s 50, 100 and 200 backstroke, along with the 200 IM.

McKeown, the reigning Olympic and long course world champion in the 200 back, is the SCM world record holder in the event, having clocked 1:58.94 back in November 2020.

Other notable entries for the Australians include Emma McKeon in the women’s 50 and 100 free, Kyle Chalmers in the men’s 50, 100 and 200 free, and Mollie O’Callaghan in the women’s 50 and 100 back.

O’Callaghan is the reigning LC world champion in the women’s 100 free and the 2022 silver medalist in the 200 free, but will sit out of both. Madison Wilson will race the 100 free along with McKeon, while Wilson and Leah Neale will take on the 200 free.

Australia bringing such a large, talented team on home soil comes after last year when Swimming Australia opted not to send a team after canceling its national championships due to a third wave of COVID-19. Holly Barratt, who announced her retirement last month, was Australia’s lone swimmer at the 2021 championships.

The Canadian team will led by Maggie MacNeil, who comes in as the defending champion in the women’s 50 back and 100 fly. MacNeil is entered in both of those events along with the 50 fly, and will also surely be depended on heavily in relays.

MacNeil’s teammate Kylie Masse, who was the silver medalist in the women’s 50, 100 and 200 backstroke in Abu Dhabi, will race all three backstrokes once again.

Coming off a phenomenal summer, Romanian sensation David Popovici will seek his first short course world title next week as he’s entered in the men’s 100, 200 and 400 free.

The men’s 100 and 200 free are shaping up to be epic clashes, with Hwang Sunwoo and Chalmers also in the mix. Another name to watch for is Great Britain’s Tom Dean, the reigning Olympic gold medalist in the 200 free.

Adam Peaty, who had a difficult long course season after fracturing his foot, is lurking down on the psych sheets but is entered to race the men’s 50, 100 and 200 breaststroke.

This will be Peaty’s first appearance at a Short Course World Championship since 2014, when he took silver in the men’s 50 and 100 breast. Although he’s known more for his prowess in the long course pool, Peaty proved he could be the best in the world in the short course pool during the 2020 ISL season, including setting a new world record in the 100 breast (that has since been broken).

OTHER NOTABLE ENTRIES

  • Fresh off breaking the world record in the women’s 400 free in late October, China’s Li Bingjie comes in as the defending world champion in both the women’s 400 and 800 free, and will also be vying for the inaugural 1500 title. She and teammate Yang Junxuan will also race the 200 free.
  • China’s Zhang Yufei will not be defending her world title in the women’s 200 fly, instead opting to race the 50 free, 50 fly and 100 fly.
  • As expected, Hong Kong’s Siobhan Haughey will defend her world titles in the women’s 100 and 200 free, though she hasn’t entered either the 50 or the 400.
  • After leading last year’s Worlds with seven medals, Louise Hansson leads this year’s Swedish roster that won’t have the same relay power it did 12 months ago due to the absence of Sarah Sjostrom. Hansson will defend her world title in the women’s 100 back, and will also seek repeat medal performances in the 50 back, 100 fly, and she’ll also race the 100 IM.
  • One race to watch out for on the women’s side is the 200 IM, where all three Tokyo Olympic medalists are set to clash. Yui OhashiAlex Walsh and Kate Douglass headline the field, but we’ve also got defending champion Sydney Pickrem, World Junior Record holder Yu Yiting and Australia’s McKeown in the mix.
  • The men’s side will also have a lot of firepower in the 200 IM, with all three podium finishers from last year in Daiya Seto, Carson Foster and Alberto Razzetti, plus current world #1 Shaine Casas and South Africa’s Matt Sates.
  • Coming off of a standout midseason performance in the NCAA, Jordan Crooks will represent the Cayman Islands in the men’s 50 and 100 free. Crooks went 18.27 in the 50-yard free at the Tennessee Invitational in November, tying him for #2 all-time in the event.
  • After going on an undefeated run in the men’s 50 free, 50 back and 50 fly on the FINA World Cup circuit, Trinidad and Tobago’s Dylan Carter will face stiff competition in all three in Melbourne. Carter will have to contend with defending champion Ben Proud and Chalmers in the 50 free, American Ryan Murphy, and co-world record holders Nicholas Santos and Szebasztian Szabo in the 50 fly. Santos is also the defending champion in the 50 fly.
  • Other swimmers who will be defending their 2021 titles on the men’s side include Alessandro Miressi (100 free), Hwang Sunwoo (200 free), Radoslaw Kawecki (200 back), Nic Fink (50/200 breast), Matteo Rivolta (100 fly), Razzetti (200 fly), and Seto (200/400 IM).
  • In addition to the swimmers mentioned above, defending their titles on the women’s side will be Rhyan White (200 back), Tang Qianting (100 breast) and Tessa Cieplucha (400 IM).

The 2022 World Short Course Championships will be held from December 13-18 in Melbourne, Australia. Keep an eye on our event page as we’ll be previewing the races over the coming week in the lead-up to the championships.

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Jonathan
2 months ago

Any news yet on how we can watch the meet in the US? I assume it will be streamed on Peacock, but I haven’t seen an announcement anywhere yet.

Ben Freedman
2 months ago

Hi Swimswam!! Can you please do a tipping completion for this world championships aswell?!

Calisurf
2 months ago

Excited to see how Popovici would perform in the SCM

Meathead
2 months ago

Anyone over 35 has to be all in on Nicholas santos.

He’s 4 years older than Lochte, 5 years older than phelps, and 9 years older than Adrian

What really stands out is being 2 years older than Thorpe

A Santos win would be the most hard to replicate swim achievement since Phelps 8 golds

Admin
Reply to  Meathead
2 months ago

2 years older than Thorpe is the one that really jumped out to me.

Khachaturian
Reply to  Meathead
2 months ago

he could be my dad. Maybe he is……..

Boz
2 months ago

Which country will break the most National Records ? Aust ? USA ? China ? My tip Hong Kong

Troyy
Reply to  Boz
2 months ago

Australia has a lot of NRs that are vulnerable from mostly ignoring short course.

Sub13
Reply to  Boz
2 months ago

Haughey is only swimming two events and the NR in one is the WR. Not sure I see HK with the most.

I think it’s probably Australia just because there are so many weak SCM records and we have a pretty good team. I expect almost all of the relays to be NRs with a few possible WRs.

Zekeringstraat
Reply to  Boz
2 months ago

Hong Kong has entered in all relay events and Haughey can swim in 7 relays (5 Women + 2 Mix), if she swim in all of them (last year she only swam one), very likely she will break a lot of records.

Plus last year Hk already broke 11 national records in sc world, and this year they send a great team with many national record holders that recently swam their PB, like Wesley Ng from Georgia, Hayden Kwan from Stanford, if things go well the team may break even more records this year.

kev
2 months ago

Got no idea why Molly not doing the freestyle ?

Gheko
Reply to  kev
2 months ago

She did not qualify in free, only for relays

Negative Nora
Reply to  kev
2 months ago

Didn’t qualify – she’ll get swims on the freestyle relays.

Troyy
Reply to  Negative Nora
2 months ago

I hope they lead her off so she can go for a time.

Jimmyswim
Reply to  kev
2 months ago

As others have said, she didn’t qualify… but in a strange way.

She didn’t swim the 50 at all which is odd because she’s almost certainly good enough for the women’s 50 free relay. Her PB is a 24.40 from 2 years ago so she’s almost certainly going to be significantly faster than that. The fourth fastest Aussie woman who made the team is Perkins with a 24.49 so I assume they will sub MOC in for the relay anyway.

She swam the 100 but missed qualification by 0.10 to Wilson. It happens.

She swam the heats of the 200 free where she came third but then didn’t swim the final. When she made the decision to skip the… Read more »

Taa
Reply to  Jimmyswim
2 months ago

She is LC world champ so she probably doesn’t want to go all in on this meet anyway she played it smart a couple backstroke swims and some relays. Not much pressure hopefully.

Jimmyswim
Reply to  Taa
2 months ago

She is a great backstroker but obviously has a heavy schedule with the 100/200 free, 50/100/200 free relay, 100 medley relay, 100 mixed free and medley relays (although she probably won’t be in the mixed 50s at SCM but would be in mixed 100s at LCM). In theory, she has one of the busiest schedules of anyone. I’m excited to see what she can do in sprint back without having to worry about free.

flicker
Reply to  Jimmyswim
2 months ago

she was also like the only swimmer from spw to show up to short course trials so clearly there wasn’t much priority placed on sc worlds in the first place, and then with freestyle theres been a lot of pressure and priority placed on that all year – especially when she had to be the top 100/200 freestyler with titmus, mckeon, campbell all not going to worlds and then jack’s injury happened, and then she doesn’t really have much sc experience and would be up against people like Haughey and Mckeon who are very good in sc, so its probably good for her to have a bit less pressure on her again and to get some international backstroke experience after… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by flicker
Troyy
Reply to  flicker
2 months ago

Even if she misses the team in the 100 free the 100 back still clashes with the 200 free at basically every major long course meet. The 200 back fits more neatly into her program but she ha-tes it.

flicker
Reply to  Troyy
2 months ago

yeah I was more so thinking about the 50 and the medley relays than the individual 100 but who knows maybe she’ll be more open to doing the 200 free/100 back double in the future she handled it decently at trials

Sub13
2 months ago

There’s a little part of me that’s thinking “most of the Aussie team’s top stars knew they were going to qualify so they probably didn’t taper for trials, maybe they’ll all just swim way faster at worlds”. But a much bigger part of me is saying that’s just delusion and wishful thinking haha.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
2 months ago

What would they taper from? Most of them had just done three taper meets (LC trials, LC Worlds, CGs) so they would’ve just been holding that third taper through to SC trials. They should definitely be faster at SC Worlds.

torchbearer
2 months ago

Some good racing coming up to end the year!

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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