Caeleb Dressel Breaks 100 Fly World Record; Milak Now #2 All-Time

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

American swimmer Caeleb Dressel won his 3rd gold medal and broke his 1st World Record of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in the men’s 100 fly final. His time of 49.45 broke his own World Record of 49.50 set at the 2019 World Championships. It also broke his own Olympic Record of 49.71 from the semi-final round.

Kristof Milak was 2nd in 49.68, setting a new European Record in the process. The old European Record belonged to Milorad Cavic, who was 2nd to Michael Phelps at the 2009 World Championship final in 49.95.

Milak is now the #2 performer of all-time in the event. Like Dressel, he also broke his own National record: the previous Hungarian Record was the 50.18 that he swam at May’s European Championships.

His time is the 4th best performance in history as well.

Both swimmers are now faster than Michael Phelps, the former World Record holder and the most-decorated swimmer in history.

All-Time Top Performers, Men’s 100 LCM Butterfly

  1. Caeleb Dressel, USA, 49.45 – Tokyo 2020 Olympics
  2. Kristof Milak, HUN, 49.68 – Tokyo 2020 Olympics
  3. Michael Phelps, USA, 49.82 – 2009 World Championships
  4. Milorad Cavic, Serbia, 49.95 – 2009 World Championships
  5. Joseph Schooling, Singapore, 50.39 – 2016 Olympics

All-Time Top Performances, Men’s 100 LCM Butterfly

  1. Caeleb Dressel, USA, 49.45 – Tokyo 2020 Olympics
  2. Caeleb Dressel, USA, 49.50 – 2019 World Championships (semis)
  3. Caeleb Dressel, USA, 49.66 – 2019 World Championships (final)
  4. Kristof Milak, HUN, 49.68 – Tokyo 2020 Olympics
  5. Caeleb Dressel, USA, 49.71 – Tokyo 2020 Olympics (semis)

That mark’s Dressel’s first personal best time of the meet where many swimmers have won races without bests.

Splits Comparisons:

Caeleb Dressel Caeleb Dressel Kristof Milak Kristof Milak
New WR Old WR New ER Old ER
50m 23.00 22.83 23.65 23.58
100m 26.45 26.67 26.03 26.60
Final Time 49.45 49.5 49.68 50.18

Dressel was out more conservatively, behind the World Record line at the turn, but his training paid off late as he came back fast.

The same was true of Milak, but even moreso. The man who won the 200 fly already in the meet had plenty on the finish, and very-nearly ran down Dressel’s sure lead, splitting 26.0 on the last 50 meters.

Dressel’s is the 2nd individual World Record and the 4th World Record overall in swimming so far at these Olympics.

Here’s how that stacks up against prior Olympic Games:

World Record trends at recent Olympic Games:

  • Tokyo 2020 – 2 (so far)
  • Rio 2016 – 8
  • London 2012 – 9
  • Beijing 2008 – 24*
  • Athens 2004 – 8
  • Sydney 2000 – 14

*In 2008, special suits made partially of polyurethane were allowed, leading to a rush of World Records. This would continue through the end of 2009, when the suits were outlawed.

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monsterbasher
1 month ago

26.0… What in seven hells?

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

Isn’t that what Schooling went out in here?

Khachaturian
1 month ago

Milak made me spit out my yogurt.

Khachaturian
Reply to  Khachaturian
1 month ago

don’t worry I cleaned it up though

neffry
1 month ago

Cavic’s 49.9 in 2009 wasn’t the ER?

CasualSwimmer
Reply to  neffry
1 month ago

Probably wasn’t recognized because the suit he swam in hadn’t been approved by FINA (like Alain Bernard’s 46.94). The time is recognized but the record isn’t homologated

Last edited 1 month ago by CasualSwimmer
Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  CasualSwimmer
1 month ago

oh it was recognised. cavic went 50.01 in the semis which was recognized as a world record. also this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_European_records_in_swimming&diff=1036357311&oldid=1036091135

cavic wore 1 arena x-glide, which was an approved suit, while bernard wore 2 suits for his 46.94 and irie swam in 1 unapproved suit for his 1:52.86

Samboys
Reply to  neffry
1 month ago

It definitely was.

This guy
1 month ago

49.29 with a better turn and finish. He won’t be happy with that swim. But when you are swimming the best of your life it only takes a tad bit more DPS to throw things off and that’s clearly what happened.

Swammer12
Reply to  This guy
1 month ago

It constantly happend to the GOAT. You can train easy speed all you want but the games are a different beast no matter who you are.

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Swammer12
1 month ago

yeah I think phelps said that his only perfect race was his 1:42.96. his freestyle was the best it ever looked and he nailed his pacing, turns and touches etc

NCSwimFan
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
1 month ago

4:03.84 was pretty close to perfect as well!

SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

100FL 2012 London Olympics:
Gold – 51.21
Silver – 51.44

100FL 2020 Tokyo Olympics:
Gold – 49.45
Silver – 49.68

monsterbasher
Reply to  SwimmerFan99
1 month ago

50.4 and 51.1 for Rio lol. A whole second faster for gold and silver. So by this pattern 48 mid Paris?

Last edited 1 month ago by monsterbasher
John26
1 month ago

It feels to me that after this race, Milak has more upside ahead of him in this event than Dressel

Pvdh
Reply to  John26
1 month ago

Milak is reaching the age where you don’t really improve your time that much. He’s 21-22 now

Sam B
Reply to  Pvdh
1 month ago

with his famously and incredibly forgetful attitude and lax training regime (he was late and had less than 15 minutes to warm up for the 200 fly) all he has is room for improvement,

WHKIRCH
Reply to  Sam B
1 month ago

Wait what?! Where is this story?

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  WHKIRCH
1 month ago

Suit ripped among other things.

Ytho
Reply to  WHKIRCH
1 month ago

His coach told the full story of what happened before that 200 fly final in an interview. Long story short, Kristóf was late from warmup because he misunderstood the schedule his coach (Attila Selmeczi) told him. He did a total of 500 meters in the warmup pool before he had to start preparing for the race. While in the last call room Kristof noticed he didn’t have his accreditation card (athletes need this card to identify themselves, idk how you call that in english, it’s my rough translatiom from hungarian) on him so there was a rush lookinh for all his stuff. While in panic mode they noticed the suit rip. Now we are 10 mins before the race, Kristóf… Read more »

Juhuu
Reply to  Pvdh
1 month ago

Milak is 21 and his main focus has been the 200 fly so imagine if he put more effort into the 100… He seemingly enjoyed this race a lot more as well as nobody was able to come close to him on the 200 for the past 2 years to push him, he’s always competing against his time and himself.

Dressel is 24 and he keeps breaking (his own and the world) record so not sure what age has to do with it. Dressel has room for improvement too, it’ll be good to watch.

Here’s to many more good races to come!

Troyy
Reply to  Pvdh
1 month ago

Tell that to Emma McKeon.

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

tell that to ryan lochte. or inge de bruin

Eagleswim
Reply to  John26
1 month ago

You saw Dressel’s turn and finish, right?

asdas
Reply to  Eagleswim
1 month ago

Yeah, and did you see Milaks start already .5 seconds behind.. he has a ton of room to improvement. His muscle mass is also geared for the 200, imagine if he wanted to train for the 100?

Swammer12
Reply to  asdas
1 month ago

He would still lose?

Eagleswim
Reply to  asdas
1 month ago

I’ve seen Dressel nail his turns and finish, I’ve never seen milak have a start anywhere close to dressel’s. That’s not something you can just make a few tweaks to match

M L
Reply to  John26
1 month ago

If Milak wants to match the 49 low/flat Dressel could’ve gone tonight with a better turn and finish, he’ll have to add muscle, which will likely slow his 200.

Lane 4 is bad in close finish
Reply to  M L
1 month ago

🤔. I’m not sure you know. Somehow I think slightly different tactics would do it. He ran out of pool when Caeleb, with a magnificent swim was decelerating. 1.75 or 8 m/s to 1.71, I think

jhumphries331
1 month ago

Milak swam a hell of a race…wins it with another few meters of room. Insane all around

Erik
1 month ago

That absolutely was an amazing comeback split by Milak, and kudos and congratulations to him for that 49.68…BUT…Caeleb easily could have swam a 49.0, maybe even around 48.9. His stroke was long on the turn, which by my estimate cost him about .3 of a second, and partially long on the finish, which I figure cost him about another .2 of a second. Caeleb is no doubt happy to get the Gold, but he must be kicking himself a bit knowing he could have gone faster, and should have.

Ytho
Reply to  Erik
1 month ago

Absolutely no way he lost .3 on the turn and .2 on the finish lool you are talking as if he missed the wall by 5 meters. That swim had like .15 in it, but cmon it is a 100 fly, nailing the turn and the finish perfectly is a 1/100 occurance.

Aqqq
Reply to  Ytho
1 month ago

You are absolutely completely wrong

Swammer12
Reply to  Ytho
1 month ago

Nah be missed them both half second easy

Erik
Reply to  Ytho
1 month ago

Do you know what .3 of a second is? Snap your fingers back to back fast…that’s about .3 of a second. It’s not 5 meters, ok? He also lost some momentum in his turn and push-off because of that, so you could really say he lost close to half a second on that. You throw in the .2 he lost on his finish, and we would be talking 48.75. But let’s give a .25 second cushion that his turn and finish was still ‘slightly off’…that still puts him at 49.00 (48.99 if we want to be cute).

Troyy
Reply to  Erik
1 month ago

“easily”

Josh
Reply to  Erik
1 month ago

Lol easily 49.0 or 48.9. All you math computation people act like gliding = moving at a speed of 0 vs a speed that is not that much slower than a perfect stroke.

Last edited 1 month ago by Josh

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Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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