Bob Bowman Discusses Popovici WR, Regan Smith to ASU, and Marchand World Titles

In the SwimSwam Podcast dive deeper into the sport you love with insider conversations about swimming. Hosted by Coleman HodgesGarrett McCaffrey, and Gold Medal Mel Stewart, SwimSwam welcomes both the biggest names in swimming that you already know, and rising stars that you need to get to know, as we break down the past, present, and future of aquatic sports.

SwimSwam sat down with Olympic head coach and Arizona State head coach Bob Bowman to initially discuss Regan Smith announcing that she would be moving to Tempe to train at ASU. While we did discuss that, we had to start the podcast by asking the legendary coach of Michael Phelps what he thought of the 17-year-old David Popovici not only breaking the world record in the 100 free, but becoming the first man in textile under 1:43 in the 200m freestyle. This swim sandwiched Popovici between Michael Phelps and Yannick Agnel on the all-time performer’s list, both athletes Bowman worked with in the past.

Bowman gives great insight into what Popovici does well in the water and where his development could take him. He then proceeds to discuss Regan Smith moving to ASU and what that will look like for her future in terms of training. Bowman also touches on his rapidly growing Post-grad group after the addition of Chase Kalisz, Jay Litherland, and Sierra Schmidt (in addition to Smith) and the development of Leon Marchand from Olympian to NCAA champion to 2x world champion in both IM events this summer.

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Music: Otis McDonald
www.otismacmusic.com

Opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the interviewed guests do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints of the hosts, SwimSwam Partners, LLC and/or SwimSwam advertising partners.

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Crawler
1 month ago

Interesting insight into Popovici’s routines. The sculling, slow speed technique remind me of Popov’s. I wonder whether we may start seeing a new cycle where focus is more on reducing drag and technique vs. power and lots of yardage. Or perhaps it is a cultural difference: central/Eastern Europe vs.USA?

Swimpop
1 month ago

The rapport and mutual respect between Coleman and Bob seems so genuine and honest. This was simply a pleasure to watch. Nice job mop head.

M L
1 month ago

Great, meaty interview! Always love to hear Bowman’s thought process.

Joel Lin
1 month ago

Needs to be said…if this assembly of pros do well under Bowman in this stage of their careers, and for some it will be their best or their last real is shot at the Olympics and Olympic medals, then great. Great for them, great for their families and great for Bowman’s continued legacy.

BUT…if this also might mean either Todd DeSorbo or Anthony Nesty miss on being an Olympic head coach in 2024 that is bad bad bad bad for the sport and for the equities USA Swimming applies to making the selections. To be clear, Bowman might bring out the best for several in this pro group, but it is what it is; and that means is a… Read more »

Taa
Reply to  Joel Lin
1 month ago

They will all be coaching their swimmers. They could put Todd as womens coach and Anthony as mens coach and make Bob head coach of all. Just don’t screw up the mixed medley thats all.

Virgil Hilts
Reply to  Joel Lin
1 month ago

@Joel Three thoughts:

1) interesting take — thanks for sharing it.

2) why are you concerned about whether either DeSorbo or Nesty is chosen to be a head Oly coach? Is SwimSwam running an early pool on coaching selections?

3) I bet many of the elite coaches would prefer not be chosen Head Coach (lots of time and pressure), For example, I bet Meehan would much prefer to be chosen as an assistant coach based on how well his swimmers do at Oly trials, rather than having the Head Coaching responsibilities. My two cents.

Admin
Reply to  Virgil Hilts
1 month ago

I’m sure Greg and Dave would love a break.

But I think the subset of people who have the drive to build a collegiate program to the top 3 in the country, but not the ambition to be the US Olympic Team head coach, would be a very, very, very, very small subset of people.

Doesn’t mean they want to do it every time. But given that neither DeSorbo nor Nesty have done it once…I have a hard time believing either would turn it down.

Also: “why are you concerned…” is like questioning the core fabric of sports as a spectator enterprise. Why are we concerned about anything that happens in swimming?

Virgil Hilts
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

<>

It was a genuine question of curiosity — not one of judgment.

I know many SwimSwam forum commenters are cheering on particular swimmers, for example, “I hope Shane Casas makes the US Oly team,” or “I hope MA figures out a way to go a sub-29 free leg on his 200 IM.” I just hadn’t heard many people expressing heartfelt concern about the US Oly Coaching selection process other than some felt that Nesty did well in Tokyo and would make a good choice.

Jamba Juice Drinker 49
Reply to  Joel Lin
1 month ago

I truly don’t believe I understand I word you said. This doesn’t make sense.

SCCOACH
Reply to  Joel Lin
1 month ago

Joel I’ve seen you post about Virginia a lot, I think this is a bit of a homer take

Joel Lin
Reply to  SCCOACH
1 month ago

It reads Todd DeSorbo & Anthony Nesty, so not sure that inference is making a counter point to my point. The argument I make is with long history as a guide there have been frictions & fissures between club, NCAA + in the recent decade pro group coaches. I’d agree with Braden’s point that most elite club & NCAA coaches aspire to the ultimate brass ring to be named a head US Olympic team coach. Rightly or wrongly club coaches have been marginalized in recent cycles, most notably the Sandpipers coach for the Tokyo Olympics staff. I’d argue the same COULD happen to NCAA coaches when stars they’ve developed move on to their next chapter with pro groups.

One hypothetical;… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Joel Lin
Don Megerle
1 month ago

That was cool stuff. Thank you for posting.

anonymous
1 month ago

I would like to know Caleb’s status. Also I would like to know Bob’s perspective on weight lifting.

M L
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

I’d like to know Bowman’s perspective on Caeleb’s status.

Mr Piano
Reply to  M L
1 month ago

I’d like to know Coleman’s perspective on Bob’s perspective on Caeleb’s status

Fraser Thorpe
Reply to  M L
1 month ago

I would like to know weightlifting’s status on Bob Bowman’s perspective.

Mr Piano
Reply to  anonymous
1 month ago

According to Bob, Michael didn’t weight lift until after the 2004 Olympics, when weights made him stronger. He’s actually said that Phelps’ best swim training was from 2002-2004 iirc

Last edited 1 month ago by Mr Piano
Grant Drukker
1 month ago

Was the 150/100/50 LCM?

Grant Drukker
1 month ago

Bowman interviews are so refreshing. Always has good stories and doesn’t hide from sharing lots of details.

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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