World Champion Gabrielle Rose on Qualifying for Olympic Trials at Age 46

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Gabrielle Rose racked up a lot of accolades before retiring at age 22: 11-12 national age group record holder, 22x NCAA All-American for Stanford, and 2x Olympian, representing Brazil in 1996 and USA in 2000.

Then, after hanging up her suit for nearly a year, she returned to the pool and ignited her pro career while training under Dave Salo. This netted her 2x LCM world titles and 3x SCM world silver medals along the way to the 2004 Olympic Trials, where she just missed the team after being diagnosed with mono weeks before.

Two decades later, Rose has qualified for another Olympic Trials at age 46 and is once again training with Dave Salo (as well as her primary coach, Scott Hubbard). Rose explains training and recovering as an older athlete, goal setting, and why she is still racing 20 years after her last experience at Olympic Trials.

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Opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the interviewed guests do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints of the hosts, SwimSwam Partners, LLC and/or SwimSwam advertising partners.

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CaliFlyer
6 months ago

I had the biggest childhood crush on Gabby when I saw her competing in the 2001 Goodwill Games. She had a full page photoshoot on Splash magazine that I posted on my wall; my motivation to swim fast so I can meet women like her. Happy to her doing so well, qualifying for Trials, and having fun; still is my inspiration 20 years later.

Carl
6 months ago

Seems like a lot of middle-aged masters swimmers want to believe they’re capable of reaching their full genetic potential and are in denial they’ve fallen out of their physical prime.

If you grew up competing in this sport and you’re continuing to do your best times into your 40’s, you either didn’t train that hard as a young swimmer, or you’re probably drugged. The latter is more likely (Dara Torres, James Fike etc…)

Buttafly
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

What ever happened to just being happy for people

Carl
Reply to  Buttafly
6 months ago

There are a lot of masters swimmers on performance enhancing drugs since they’re not tested. When you do best times decades after your physical prime… it’s worth questioning.

Call it healthy skepticism

ROPES
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

I am 65 and still get a kick out of beating younger competitors. It not about beating elite athletes. It’s about achieving PB’s and the fun in doing it.

postgrad swimmer
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

What a horrible take

bubo
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

Crustiest take of all time

Fraser Thorpe
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

Seems like you’ve got a major chip on your shoulder

Tomek
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

Based on your personal experience?

Boxall's Railing
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

While I would agree with maybe a part of your implied point that true physical prime ability is in 20s for males/ late teens for females, having a first assumption of performance enhancing drugs is the wrong take, and really harmful if you’re actually wrong in an individual’s case.

If someone goes best times in their 40s, I think first logical assumption should be that their training methods “just sucked” relatively when they were in their teens or twenties. Not their fault either, just a sign of the times.

Antipodean
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

You seem bitter.

Mike Sharadin
Reply to  Carl
6 months ago

Well, that’s a lot of innuendo and speculation From someone that has provided no information other than a name. The premise that they didn’t train as hard as a young swimmer and yet they had world-class times, and multiple world medals, or they were drugged now to achieve improvement is embarrassing to anyone that would say that out loud. I surmise the Carl is frustrated and I hope he doesn’t operate heavy equipment that can hurt others.

Trials Countdown
Reply to  Carl
29 days ago

2024 Olympic Semifinals. Guess you were just plain wrong!

Aki
6 months ago

Definition of a Bad A$$. Inspiring.
Parabens e Boa Sorte!

Kabes
6 months ago

Breastrokers age like fine wine

tea rex
6 months ago

Reminds me: “there’s still time…”
Is she the oldest qualifier ever?

James Beam
6 months ago

very inspiring for us old folks! Love seeing stories like this.

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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