Tokyo Medalist Santo Condorelli Given 18-Month FINA Ban for Whereabouts Failures

by Spencer Penland 60

September 14th, 2022 Anti-Doping, Europe, News

Tokyo 2020 Olympic medalist Santo Condorelli has received an 18-month ban by FINA as result of ‘whereabouts failure” pertaining to anti-doping drug tests. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is in charge of doping control measures for FINA, the international governing body that oversees aquatic sports all over the world.

Condorelli’s ban began on June 24th, meaning it will extend until December 23rd, 2023. That means Condorelli will be ineligible to compete at any FINA sanctioned competition until the ban is up, which leaves the 27-year-old out of contention for a number of major meets.

A “whereabouts failure” typically indicates that said athlete has failed to submit their whereabouts, in other words, where they live or are staying temporarily, by a required deadline. The violation can also occur in the event that the athlete doesn’t provide sufficient information on how the testers can access them at home. For example, if the athlete lives in a gated community and fails to disclose that, so the testers can’t get inside, or if the athlete lives in an apartment complex and uses the main address but doesn’t include their unit number.

The specifics on Condorelli’s whereabouts violation are still unknown at the time, however, an 18-month ban has become the norm for such an offense. SwimSwam has reached out to Condorelli regarding the ban, but hasn’t yet received a response as of the time this article was published.

Condorelli won his first Olympic medal last summer, competing on Italy’s men’s 4×100 free relay, which earned silver. He swam on the prelims relay, splitting 47.90 on the 2nd leg. The Italian squad would break the national record in the event, though it would only stand until finals that night, when they lowered the mark again. Condorelli was the only member of the prelims relay in Tokyo who didn’t go on to race on the finals relay. He was replaced by Thomas Ceccon, who split 47.45 in finals.

From 2015-2018, Condorelli represented Canada internationally. He qualified for the Canadian Olympic team in 2016, where he narrowly missed out on winning an individual Olympic medal. The then 21-year-old swam a 47.88 in finals of the men’s 100 free, finishing fourth in the Olympic final by just 0.03 seconds.

Condorelli has moved around a ton his entire life. He was born in Japan, and grew up competing in and for the USA. At the 2013 U.S. Junior National Championships, Condorelli set the U.S. National Age Group Record in the LCM 100 free for 17-18 boys. He only began to compete for Canada in 2015, which he was allowed to do because his mother is a Canadian citizen. Condorelli’s father is Italian, allowing him to represent Italy internationally.

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The unoriginal Tim
8 days ago

Should be tests at meets and once a month by appointment. Swimmers don’t earn enough for the hassle and invasion of privacy that comes with the WADA regime.

Troyy
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
8 days ago

Might as well not test them out of competition at all then.

Beginner Swimmer at 25
9 days ago

Christian Coleman got suspended for this and his alibi was Chipotle

Coco
Reply to  Beginner Swimmer at 25
8 days ago

He got suspended for missing 3 tests in a year, Condorelli just didn’t update Wada to where he is living

Troyy
Reply to  Coco
8 days ago

Where did you find out that Condorelli’s whereabouts failures were all filing failures rather than missed tests? As fae as I can see that hasn’t been reported.

BigBoiJohnson
9 days ago

47.99 – Brent Hayden
47.28 – Joshua Liendo
47.15 – Yuri Kisil
47.38 – Santo Condorelli

3:09.80. Safely assuming absolutely no improvement from the young quickly improving Liendo, or Condorelli (if the latter had stayed in Canada as he should have). With improvement from either of those two swimmers (or even Brent Hayden, who had only been in the water for a year after a 9-year retirement when he swam that 47 flat start), we’re looking at a potential gold medal in Paris 2024. A damn shame. If only he had the patience.

Last edited 9 days ago by BigBoiJohnson
jdsmitty1
Reply to  BigBoiJohnson
9 days ago

Hayden is retired

BigBoiJohnson
Reply to  jdsmitty1
9 days ago

Might not have if he saw the opportunity for a Gold. Regardless, just substitute the quickly-improving Rusian Gaziev who will likely be faster by that point

How I Got My Shrunken Head
Reply to  BigBoiJohnson
9 days ago

Brent Hayden would be 40 by the time Paris rolls around. You must be insane to think that he could still break 48 seconds by then.

BigBoiJohnson
Reply to  How I Got My Shrunken Head
9 days ago

He did it at 37 years, 9 months, 5 days old after a 9-year retirement with one year of training under his belt during a global pandemic. I fear I might not be the insane one here, kiddo.

Last edited 9 days ago by BigBoiJohnson
Admin
Reply to  BigBoiJohnson
8 days ago

And then his body fell apart.

I think people get so caught up in the ideas of “willpower” and “strength” and “training approach” that they forget that as athletes age, their bodies just can’t cope with the strain the same way that it once could. Sometimes, that just can’t be overcome regardless of an individual’s willpower.

Stallion06
9 days ago

Real G’s move in silence like lasagna

Verram
9 days ago

I would like to know his whereabouts too actually .. didn’t know he was still swimming lol

BearlyBreathing
9 days ago

comment image

SprintDude9000
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
9 days ago

Damn…good effort! 😂👍

swimmerTX
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
8 days ago

You have too much free time on your hands.

FormerD1
9 days ago

The comments in thread are amazing. Whatever you did santos, LOL! Good on ya