Tokyo 2020 Medal Table: US Reaches 30 Medals, McKeon Leads Australian to 20

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES


The final night of pool swimming competition wrapped up in Tokyo with the US and Australia sweeping the gold medals for the session.

American Caeleb Dressel was responsible for two of those gold medals, winning the men’s 50 freestyle and teaming up with Ryan Murphy, Michael Andrew, and Zach Apple to claim the top spot in the 4×100 medley relay. 

Dressel’s Florida teammate Bobby Finke also claimed gold, swimming to victory in the men’s 1500 freestyle, his second win of the meet.

The US women also won a silver medal on the women’s 4×100 medley relay to round out the country’s medal total with 30. Although the US did not win as many medals as they did in Rio, the team still led the swimming medal count by 10 medals over Australia. 

Australia saw both of its victories on the women’s side as Emma McKeon won the women’s 50 freestyle in an Olympic record time, and the women’s 4×100 medley relay finished first ahead of the US. For McKeon, her victories give her a total of 7 medals for the Tokyo Olympics, tying her for the most medals ever won by a woman at an Olympics in history. 

The aforementioned Dressel led all men at the competition with a total of 5 medals, all of which were gold. 

Denmark earned its first medal of the competition via Pernille Blume’s 3rd place finish in the 50 freestyle, as did Sweden with Sara Sjostrom’s second place finish.

Day 8 Medal Table:

Nation Total Medals Gold Silver Bronze
USA 30 11 10 9
Australia 20 9 3 8
Great Britain 8 4 3 1
People’s Republic of China 6 3 2 1
ROC 5 2 2 1
Japan 3 2 1 0
Canada 6 1 3 2
South Africa 2 1 1 0
Hungary 2 1 1 0
Tunisia 1 1 0 0
Italy 6 0 2 4
Hong Kong, China 2 0 2 0
Netherlands 2 0 2 0
Ukraine 2 0 1 1
France 1 0 1 0
Sweden 1 0 1 0
Switzerland 2 0 0 2
Germany 2 0 0 2
Brazil 2 0 0 2
Finland 1 0 0 1
Denmark 1 0 0 1

2016 Day 8 Medal Table:

Nation Total Medals Gold Silver Bronze
United States 33 16 8 9
Australia 10 3 4 3
Hungary 7 3 2 2
Japan 7 2 2 3
Great Britain 6 1 5 0
China 6 1 2 3
Canada 6 1 1 4
Sweden 3 1 1 1
Italy 3 1 0 2
Denmark 2 1 0 1
Spain 2 1 0 1
Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0
Singapore 1 1 0 0
South Africa 3 0 3 0
Russia 4 0 2 2
France 2 0 2 0
Belgium 1 0 1 0
Belarus 1 0 0 1

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BillyBob
1 month ago

People got really upset with me for pointing out that Australia has more swimmers in year round swimming than the USA. Swimming is their biggest sport if you count men and women together. It’s not in the top 10 for USA. Very impressive we continue to dominate. A testament to the American spirit.

maverick1993
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

I am curious if you have a source for your data.

BillyBob
Reply to  maverick1993
1 month ago

With 5 million participants across Australia, the report also found swimming teaches life skills such as discipline, hard work, determination, work ethic, time management and commitment.

“Swimming is Australia’s largest participation sport

Luke
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

https://www.statista.com/statistics/191621/participants-in-swimming-in-the-us-since-2006/ That link shows you a fair comparison to Australia. Unfortunately swimming Australia doesn’t show their total swimming membership numbers. The Australian numbers you have used include people who may swim for fitness and children learning to swim

Troyy
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

Most of that is leisure swimming not competitive swimming. So people just splashing about at the beach and local pool.

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyy
BillyBob
Reply to  maverick1993
1 month ago
BillyBob
Reply to  maverick1993
1 month ago

USA swimming has 400,000 members. Australia swimming has 5 million.

Admin
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

You’re not making an apples-to-apples comparison. Swimming Australia is using an “all swimmers” number. The USA Swimming number is just a “members of the mostly-youth competitive swimming organization.”

20% of the Australian population are definitely not active and registered competitive swimmers. This would include the octagenarians at your local YMCA, Masters swimmers, summer leaguers, triathletes, cross training marathoners, etc.

These numbers are always fudged by the trade orgs that benefit from professing the economic impact, but the more apples-to-apples number in the US is like 25 million+

BillyBob
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

Interesting. Does Australia have a similar organization to USA swimming? What are the numbers for that group? I have a friend from Australia who assured me it is the biggest sport there.

Sub13
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

Your friend from Australia is mistaken. Less than 5% of the population would be able to name half of our Olympic swimming team.

Koala
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

They may be able to name the ones they see on the tv this week. Maybe.

Robbos
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

This is the Donald trump way, just make facts up & just hope enough people believe in you BillyBob.
The trouble for you mate is that you have people here who live & breathe in Australia & though we are very proud of our Olympic swimmers & outside of Titmus, Cate Campbell & Chalmers, most Australians prior to Olympics could not have named another swimmer.

We have 4 codes of football, Cricket all far bigger sports then swimming.

M d e
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

It’s the biggest ‘Olympic’ sport probably.

Well behind afl, rugby league, netball, cricket etc.

Robbos
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Netball?

unclegibbo
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Competitive sport in Australia is club based ( not school based )
There would be at least 20 sports on the Olympic programme larger if we are going by club numbers
recreational swimming would be smaller than recreational walking ( walking is an Olympic sport )

BoetMate
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

Australia has 90K registered swimmers, USA has 400k. End of silly discussion
https://www.swimming.org.au/about-us-3.
US has about 27M people who swim
https://www.statista.com/statistics/191621/participants-in-swimming-in-the-us-since-2006/

Luke
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

I assume you have looked at abs statistics which say that swimming in Australia has a high participation rate. However this is not the number of people who actually compete in competitive swimming through clubs.

Joel
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

I’d say you are wrong. Football and netball and cricket and soccer are way more popular in Australia. You saw in some events we didn’t have qualifiers. We only took 35 swimmers. Didn’t USA take 50 something?

BillyBob
Reply to  Joel
1 month ago

Yes. That’s not what I’m talking about though. AUS has more swimmers on the whole, thus more to choose from. People act like it’s surprising that Australia gets a lot of metals but they actually should do better than the United States when you consider how many people they have swimming in their country.

Sub13
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

They do not. There are more people in the USA who swim for fitness than Australia’s entire population.

Sub13
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

You are absolutely kidding yourself.

In 2018, 27.5 million Americans said that they participated in swimming https://www.statista.com/statistics/191621/participants-in-swimming-in-the-us-since-2006/

Australian population is 25.5 million. Even using your number of 5 million, USA has almost 6 times as many swimmers than Australia. Why don’t you have 6 times as many medals?

This is embarrassing. Maybe people get upset with you because you’re so obviously wrong and you keep making these same comments.

Last edited 1 month ago by Sub13
Laps
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

80% of Australians live 50 km from the shoreline and our summers are hot so there are a lot of people who might swim recreationally, go to the beach/pools on a hot day but it’s not exactly the quality competitive environment of the NCAA. Participation numbers are also skewed by swim classes being mandatory for young school kids but it’s more about water safety, learning to tread water and float than stroke technique, starts and underwaters.

If you want to see how popular swimming is outside the Olympics look no further than the fact that the 2019 world champs were not televised anywhere on Australian TV, free to air or otherwise.

Texas Tap Water
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

Billy Bob talking out of his arse just to trash Australia in a thread about Australia.

Very low.

unclegibbo
Reply to  Texas Tap Water
1 month ago

Very American
Americans need an enemy
They need someone to hate

Luke
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

https://ascta.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/State-of-play-report.pdf This link tells Australia’s club participation rate. Australia only has about 93000 club participants. Which is a quarter of USA club participation

Yup
1 month ago

Cool to see more countries getting medals in 2021 than 2016.

Long live Tunisia

Sub13
Reply to  Yup
1 month ago

Not going to lie: that one hurt as an Aussie since we had the top 3 times in the world going into it, but have to be happy for Tunisia. That gold medal probably means the world to them.

Tomek
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

There is always a next time mate 🙂 I know it hurts when the expectations are high and swimmers do not deliver.

Verram
1 month ago

Just happy that Australia literally doubled its tally from Rio that’s a massive achievement given their “choker” tag by some people here

And happy that we got an actual competition in many races..

Sub13
Reply to  Verram
1 month ago

Doubles total medals is great. Tripled number of golds is even better.

Khachaturian
1 month ago

I’m already getting excited for the ISL and world championships!

Torchbearer
1 month ago

What is peoples opinion on Australias super tough qualifying standards, and resultant ‘small’ team? Coupled with the late trials, seems to have worked very well.

Sub13
Reply to  Torchbearer
1 month ago

I am happy that we use tough standards, but I also think there should be a little leeway. Dekkers made the FINA A cut in the qualifying period (just not at trials) and her PB would have been fifth in the 200 fly final. There’s a solid chance she could have swam a new PB and been in medal contention as well.

However, it seems like the smaller team has really added some camaraderie which makes a difference.

Re the late trials, I am 100% for them. Not everyone matched their trials times, but we were waaaaay closer than other Olympics.

Robbos
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Exactly, the only ones that missed out that may have benefited from the experience, swimmers like Lizzy Dekkers, Sam Short & maybe Jen Forrester.

This was Australia’s first time (Olympic) had trials so close to Olympics, only Titmus in 400 & above swam faster at trials then Olympics.

M d e
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Maybe we should do top 2 at trials plus time hit in qualifying window?

Sub13
Reply to  M d e
1 month ago

Yes. I think if you’re top 2 at trials, and have met both criteria (FINA A cut and would have made the final at worlds) at least in the qualification period (even if you don’t necessarily hit that at trials) you should be given a chance. Particularly for those young ones who have never been to an Olympics before because it would give them some great experience.

Texas Tap Water
Reply to  Torchbearer
1 month ago

I think late trials were beneficial.

boknows34
1 month ago

21 countries taking home a medal compared to 18 in Rio. Is 21 a record for the Olympics?

Sub13
1 month ago

If Emma McKeon was a country, she would be 14th on the overall Olympic medal tally right now. Dressel would be 9th 😳

Sab
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Not really. In this case only individual medals count.

That jerk Mitch
1 month ago

That settles it then.

About Nicole Miller

Nicole Miller

Nicole has been with SwimSwam since April 2020, as both a reporter and social media contributor. Prior to joining the SwimSwam platform, Nicole also managed a successful Instagram platform, amassing over 20,000 followers. Currently, Nicole is pursuing her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where she is an active …

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