Kyle Chalmers Discusses Titanic Battle with Caeleb Dressel in 100 Free

In the SwimSwam Podcast dive deeper into the sport you love with insider conversations about swimming. Hosted by Coleman HodgesGarrett McCaffrey, and Gold Medal Mel Stewart, SwimSwam welcomes both the biggest names in swimming that you already know, and rising stars that you need to get to know, as we break down the past, present, and future of aquatic sports.

We sat down with the 2016 Olympic champion and 2020 silver medalist in the 100 free, Kyle Chalmers to get his perspective on the 2020 Olympic Games. Chalmers starts with the lead-up to his trials which was riddled with injury, namely in both of his shoulders. Chalmers admits he couldn’t even train at a full schedule until after the Australian trials.
However, once he was in Tokyo, he felt confident, especially after throwing down a 46.4 anchor split on the 4×100 free relay. Chalmers takes us through the prelims and semis of the 100 free and then gives us his expert analysis on the battle he had with Caeleb Dressel in the final. It was great to get Chalmers’ perspective on this because although he obviously wanted gold, he recognizes how much he went through to get to this point and what an achievement like this means to not only him but the people around him who helped make it happen.

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Opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the interviewed guests do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints of the hosts, SwimSwam Partners, LLC and/or SwimSwam advertising partners.

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PBJSwimming
2 months ago

Wow! He’s been through a lot of physical pain and issues since Rio. It makes his successes in Tokyo even more admirable.

Riccardo
Reply to  PBJSwimming
2 months ago

Thorpe was the same with injuries and was also unbelievable at a young age. Magnussen was his best at 21. Eamon Sullivan dealt with injuries constantly.

Aussies overtrain in those developmental years imo. It produces amazing performances early like Thorpe’s times in 2001 at 18 and Chalmers at 18 in Rio but it comes at a cost.

Last edited 2 months ago by Riccardo
Coach Macgyver
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

You have a great point, except Chalmers dropped .5 off his 100 in 4 years.

Riccardo
Reply to  Coach Macgyver
2 months ago

To his credit Chalmers has been able to manage the injury issues better than all of them.

He was only 18 in Rio so it would be shocking if he didn’t improve.

I’m more just saying it’s a shame that they don’t seem to have much longevity. McEvoy is also not the same as he was at a young age.

Thorpe being effectively retired at 21 (the racing he did in 05 and 06 barely counts) is one of the great disappointments in swimming history.

Eisenheim
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

Well said, Riccardo. It would have been great to see Thorpe’s career look a little different. Truly the goat.

HJones
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

A bit off-topic, but to say McEvoy isn’t the same would be an understatement. Leading off an Olympic relay in 49.18 when you’ve gone 47.04 textile in your lifetime should be grounds for a ban from all further Australian national teams. David Morgan is also on VERY thin ice.

Ragnar
2 months ago

Kyle with three years of no injuries is gonna be the sight to see in Paris, good luck bud

HJones
Reply to  Ragnar
2 months ago

It’s also crazy that Chalmers is about 2 years younger than Dressel!

anonymous
Reply to  Ragnar
2 months ago

His left shoulder is toast. He may not make it to Paris.

Nomo
Reply to  anonymous
2 months ago

Doesn’t Chalmers have access to the same Australian ex-pro rugby trainer, who through some undisclosed “extraordinary treatment” (per AUS media/Julian Linden), was able to rehabilitate Ariarne Titmus’ shoulder in three months out of the water to the point where she was swimming faster after her jnjury than before her injury?

Eric the eel > Phelps
2 months ago

I would love to see him in the 100 fly

sven
Reply to  Coleman Hodges
2 months ago

Maybe it’s a hot take, but I’d say that proper butterfly is easier on the shoulder joint/ligaments/bursa than freestyle on the basis of symmetry and stability. Poor butterfly technique is horrible for the shoulder, sure, but Chalmers probably doesn’t have to worry too much there.

96Swim
2 months ago

Awesome of the Australians to be some accommodating to do your podcast. The one with Magnassun was great too. If you could get Ledecky and Titmus to do one together where they both talked through their approach to the 400 at the Olympics and their strategy, it would be about the best thing ever.

Coach Mike 1952
Reply to  96Swim
2 months ago

Agree about Aussies to join the SwimSwam podcasts. I’ve said it before & will say it again: SwSw is just crushing it with these PC’s. Kyle after 2019 Worlds held Dressel’s arm up after that 100 free. Great sportsmanship. They both push each other, like Phelps & Lochte – respect each other greatly – & rightfully so. Identical PB 47.08’s at 2019 Worlds & 2020 Tokyo too. Other Q – would L & T in fact do a PC together though?

Last edited 2 months ago by Coach Mike 1952
Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Coach Mike 1952
2 months ago

I mean the australian media managed to get an interview with them together after the 800, so maybe?

for reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHVDDYdHnpg

Yozhik
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
2 months ago

It’s not an interview that i’m interested in. They both been just polite acknowledging the usefulness of competition. Titmus said practically nothing. But that is her who is on the rise and everybody are intrigued at what point of her progress curve she is at.

Spectatorn
Reply to  Coach Mike 1952
2 months ago

yes, also would love to hear from Emma McKeon. She has a big program at Tokyo and she did very well in all her events. It will be great to hear her perspective. I feel like with all the big stories/rivalries (men 100 free, women 200/400/800, men medley relay, both men and women 100 back, etc) before the game, her success and 7 medals in one game seems to not getting the same attention.

Yozhik
Reply to  96Swim
2 months ago

It would be indeed interesting to hear from Titmus being interviewed by American reporter. How will she describe her plans? Are they still aggressive in the rising teenager style or we will listen to something mature from the person who knows how much 0.1 sec improvement of personal best costs. She will be 21 already in September. Does she feel like world records in 200FR and 400FR? Or we will have another version of Thorpe’s 3:40.08 story when breaking 3:40 barrier seemed to be a matter of just next meet. Ian even visibly slowed down at last meters of this 3:40.08 race. But it happened to be his limits.
Also nbc footage of 800m final didn’t show the reaction… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Yozhik
Ghost
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

How about an interview with Lily King asking “ how does it feel to get outsplit by a hs kid who swam with goggles in her mouth?” Or one with Zach asking “what he was doing that last 50 on relay….how Finke outsplit him by 4 secs on his 1500”?
The interview with Chalmers was excellent!

Yozhik
Reply to  Ghost
2 months ago

I like interviews where I am learning something new: facts, mindset, feelings, related to swimmer’s performance stories, scandals whatever.
This interview was interesting. I learned more about this person. The interviews you proposed will be interesting as well 😀
But I never liked , for instance, interviews with Ledecky. Zero information. With the exception of some early ones made immediately after London. There you could see the emotions of high school sophomore. So much trained in PR now.

Last edited 2 months ago by Yozhik
Yozhik
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

The interview isn’t an easy job. Some interviewees are talking non-stop without letting interrupt them with new question. Some people cannot say a word. And that is the art of the person who runs interview to make such person interesting to others. And that is indeed the art and Mr. Hodges is mastering it. True. The structure of the interview, the substance of the questions and the gentle manner of asking opens people to show who they are. And there is definitely some reason of them to be interviewed at first place.
I hate the following type of interview questions that are usually asked on deck after race: what was in your mind when you touched the wall? So… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Yozhik
Awsi Dooger
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

I have no idea why you are being downvoted. You make great points regarding Titmus’ motivation and how it impacts her future. She has to be incredibly frustrated, with the second and third fastest times at both 200 and 400 yet never owning a long course world record. She emphasized years ago the desire for her “first” world record, as if assuming there would be several. I think her world would be totally different right now if she had gotten at least one of them, especially that 400 at Tokyo instead of .23 short. These women cannot wind up and do it again. It isn’t like a Diamond League meet with pacers. Everything has to set up perfectly. You get… Read more »

David
2 months ago

Fastest freestyler in the world.
However the start and turn king is Dressel

Big Kicker
Reply to  David
2 months ago

Both of which are arguably part of freestyle

Philip Johnson
Reply to  Big Kicker
2 months ago

I would be interested in a race started in the water, no starting blocks, and just straight up swim in point B with no turn.

Togger
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

Don’t think Dressel himself would claim he was winning that. Probably bring in some more 200 guys too as it’s more tiring to have no turn, reckon Duncan Scott could be the favourite in that race.

remel can do anything
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

townley will love it

anonymous
Reply to  remel can do anything
2 months ago

Townley outswims everyone but his start and turns are so abysmal and he doesn’t seem to work on it.

DCSwim
Reply to  anonymous
2 months ago

This honestly makes his 1:30 in 2016 more impressive

anonymous
Reply to  DCSwim
2 months ago

yes

Yozhik
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

And starting wall as well 😀 No push. Just pure swimming. Like cyclist on velodrome. Are helped t to keep balance at start and then go.
But for some reason the starting blocks were introduced and improved to competitive swimming. If to check the footage of 70x there were no such a luxury at all. So let’s stay with what we have now and don’t create some hypothetical scenario that will benefit a swimmer who is not that good in particular part of the race. Because if we go this way then the next proposition will be the raising significantly the temperature of the water equalizing by that the opportunities of good and bad swimmers like letting golfers playing… Read more »

Andysup
Reply to  Yozhik
2 months ago

Have any of you ever seen open water swimming?

PBJSwimming
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

David Popovici has entered the chat.

David
Reply to  Big Kicker
2 months ago

I should’ve said front crawl

Mr Piano
Reply to  David
2 months ago

Chalmers had every opportunity to work on his start. He also has a faster underwater turn than Dressel. Dressel won it fair and square.

Robbos
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Massive Chalmers fan, laugh when many were writing him off.
But even Chalmers said he was beaten by a better swimmer 0.06 better, starts, turns, swimming, it’s all part of swimming. BTW Chalmers did work on his start, he was much better then RIO.

Last edited 2 months ago by Robbos
M d e
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Chalmers has worked on his start. Dressel is just still better there, because he has the best start ever.

Manta520
2 months ago

Impressive. He has acquired much wisdom given his age. I really enjoyed hearing his insights. Thanks, Coleman!

PVK
2 months ago

47.0 with these types of injuries?? Amazing!

Philip Johnson
2 months ago

The Dressel vs. Chalmers stats.

2016 Olympics: Chalmers (47.58 to 48.02)
2018: Chalmers (48.00 to 48.22)
2019: Dressel (46.96 to 47.08)
Dressel (47.34 to 47.37 on mixed free relay)
2020 Olympics: Dressel (47.02 to 47.08)

Epic rivalry, my dream is for both of them to go under 47 in a race.

Riccardo
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

If you’re going to count 2018 for Chalmers where Dressel was injured in the lead up you have to give Caeleb credit for being on top in 2017 when Chalmers was injured.

Philip Johnson
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

I was just doing head to head; Chalmers did not compete in the 100 free in 2017.

Joel
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

Bull#$&*. Chalmers was injured most of this year but you’re not taking that into account?

Eric the eel > Phelps
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

Kyle Chalmers 100 free gold in Fukuoka

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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