Kamminga Casually Clocks 2:07.71 200 Breast In Eindhoven

DUTCH NATIONAL TEAM TIME TRIAL

  • Friday, April 30th & Saturday, May 1st
  • Eindhoven, Netherlands
  • LCM (50m)
  • Results

Following up on his eye-popping performance of 57.90 in the men’s 100m breaststroke, Arno Kamminga lit it up in the 200m distance in Eindhoven.

Competing on day 2 of the national team time trial, the 25-year-old European short course champion fired off an impressive 2:07.71 200m breast. The man opened in 1:02.14 and closed in 1:05.57 to produce the 5th fastest time of his career.

Kamminga already owns the Dutch national record with the massive 2:06.85 he posted in Rotterdam last December, a mark which renders him as the 5th fastest performer of all time in the event. This time trial further produces a case for Kamminga to be in the medal conversation for both the 100m and 200m come Tokyo fewer than 100 days from now.

Also making waves in Eindhoven was Kira Toussaint, the national record holder in the 50m and 100m backstroke for the Netherlands. Toussaint touched in a time of 58.87 in the 100m back, produced via splits of 28.48/30.39. That result sits just outside the fastest time of her career, which is represented by the 58.65 she logged just last month. Her 58.65 PB ranks her #3 in the world this season.

Additional standout swims included Jesse Puts posting 22.14 to get the .05 edge over Thom de Boer‘s runner-up result of 22.19. The women’s 100m free saw Kim Busch take the top spot in 54.90 after having posted 54.81 in the morning.

Oympian Femke Heemskerk clocked a tmoe of 24.90 in the women’s 50m free. She’s already been as fast as 24.28 to rank 7th in the world this season.

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flex tape cant fix that
4 months ago

Was this prelims?

Yozhik
4 months ago

Kamminga’s performances at this meet are spectacular. With his outstanding result in 100m event he dethroned Adam Peaty of being the most dominant active swimmer. Now this title is awarded to Ledecky’s world records in 800 and 1500 events.
Just arithmetic, no other factors were considered.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

Agreed on that analysis

Yozhik
Reply to  ERVINFORTHEWIN
4 months ago

Yep, Peaty is coming back to the “human” status. 😀

Yozhik
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

Interesting to notice that I was under impression that Peaty’s and Ledecky’s records if not forever then for decades to come for sure. But these simple calculations show that the advantage is 2 or less percents. That is even less than high-tech suits gave. And practically all these “rubber” records are gone already.

cswammer
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

????

Yozhik
Reply to  cswammer
4 months ago

What part of these elementary school level calculations you didn’t understand?
Peaty – (57.9 – 56.88)/56.88 = 1.79%
Calculate the level of Ledecky’s dominance yourself.
Hint: use for comparison Adlington’s (retired) 8:14.10 and Friis (retired) 15.38.86

Littlefin
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

Why are you so rude?

Yozhik
Reply to  Littlefin
4 months ago

Just replying with the same level of politeness as the original “????” question. If we speak different languages we may not understand each other?

Last edited 4 months ago by Yozhik
Yozhik
Reply to  Littlefin
4 months ago

As the call so the echo.
Do you think you are polite?
The Mrs. Cswammer was completely satisfied with my answer and my tone. What made you to be so offensively aggressive?

Troyy
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

Peaty only has to increase the distance between him and Kamminga by about 0.10 to reclaim it.

Yozhik
Reply to  Troyy
4 months ago

Thank you for reminding me that 1500m distance is 15 times longer than the 100m one. So the equivalent of 0.1(m?) will be sizeable 1.5m in Katie’s case. That is almost body length. A lot isn’t it? Can she win that much against herself. If it is not that 200-1500 double and very challenging 800 relay next day I would expect her go under 15:20. And also Katie is competing with that against the result of retired swimmer but in Peaty’s case we don’t know if Kamminga has reached already his limits.
But take it easy. All these artificial competitions on paper of who is greater is bs. I did it because it is Saturday and I don’t have… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Yozhik
Dee
4 months ago

Impressive!

A bit off topic, but I have noticed a real boom in Dutch sport across the board in the past 12 months and they’re now expected to win as many golds in Tokyo as France and Italy combined, despite having almost 100 million fewer people. Do any Dutchies on here know what changes (because I am presuming it was centralised due to the improvements being across Olympic sports) have taken place? I think we’ll see a lot of European countries looking at the Netherlands post Tokyo and trying to learn from whatever you’re doing.

Yozhik
Reply to  Dee
4 months ago

COVID effect? 😀

Yozhik
Reply to  Yozhik
4 months ago

My apology to those who took my post seriously. I know that the COVID pandemic is not something to joke about. Today Netherlands passed the mark of having one person died per each one thousand population.
But my comment was about the example of how deceiving and manipulative the statistics can be in hands of people who have nothing to do with real science.

Jimbo
Reply to  Dee
4 months ago

I think the cycling events account for quite a bit of the strong medal predictions.

CRD
Reply to  Dee
4 months ago

For the swimming part, they changed a lot after the disappointed 2016 olympics

HJones
4 months ago

He just posted a video of his 100 breast on IG. Unless the pool is 49m, the swim is legit!

SwimSam
Reply to  HJones
4 months ago

Didn’t see anyone bump the touchpads, only saw a very talented swimmer go really fast

Torchbearer
Reply to  HJones
4 months ago

Unless they pool is 49m or is Uzbeki.,

FST
4 months ago

I hope this translates to a dynamite Olympic Games for him. Nobody can touch Peaty in the 100, but the race for the rest of the podium and the 200 are going to be interesting! And what a well-rounded breaststroker Kamminga is!

Last edited 4 months ago by FST
Torchbearer
Reply to  FST
4 months ago

Who knows what a competitor might do to Peatys race plan….

He said what?
Reply to  Torchbearer
4 months ago

Probably not much. Adam just dives in and goes like hell. He has experienced tight competitions with ISL. This shouldn’t rattle him.

Dudeman
Reply to  Torchbearer
4 months ago

ahh yes, that nail biting finish of being 1 second ahead of the 2nd place guy would really throw peaty off. 57.9 is absolutely unreal but Peaty is on another level, a “bad” race for him at the Olympics would be around the 57.3 that he just hit at the British trials and that is still a massive margin of victroy

Landen
Reply to  FST
4 months ago

I’d argue there’s a better chance of jamming a taking the 100 over the 200

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Retta Race

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