Emma McKeon Leads All #Tokyo2020 Olympic Swimming Individual Medalists

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

Pool swimming has officially come to a close for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. In total, 208 different Olympic medals were distributed among 124 swimmers. 27-year-old Aussie Emma McKeon earned the most medal of all swimming Olympic medalists with seven, the most ever achieved by a woman in a single Olympics. McKeon picked up four relay medals, two gold (400 free/medley relays) and two bronze (800 free/mixed 400 medley relays), and three individual medals, including 100 fly bronze and a 50/100 free double gold sweep.

The swimmer with the next-most medals is 24-year-old American Caeleb Dressel, who hit five gold medals, just one more than McKeon’s four Tokyo golds. Dressel was a member of the gold medal-winning 400 free relay and world record-breaking 400 medley relay, as well as nabbing three individual medals in the 50/100 free and 100 fly.

20-year-old Kaylee McKeown was the swimmer with the third-most medals with four, three of them being gold. McKeown was a dominant force in the backstroke events with her 100/200 event sweep, as well as leading off the winning 400 medley relay and contributing to the mixed 400 medley relay alongside McKeon. McKeown also had the third-most gold medals behind Dressel’s five and McKeon’s four.

More swimmers that picked up four medals include 24-year-old American Katie Ledecky (400/800/1500 free, 800 free relay), 23-year-old Chinese Zhang Yufei (100/200 fly, 800 free/mixed 400 medley relay), 20-year-old Aussie Ariarne Titmus (200/400/800 free, 800 free relay), and 24-year-old Brit Duncan Scott (200 free/IM, 800 free/400 medley relay). Following the top seven swimmers were 13 swimmers that earned three medals in total.

Among the double-medal winners on the medalists list, only 8 swimmers picked up two individual-only medals in Tokyo.

  • Siobhan Haughey earned Hong Kong’s first two swimming medals by hitting silver in both the 100 free and 200 free.
  • Hungarian Kristof Milak won the Olympic title in the 200 fly as well as taking silver in the 100 fly.
  • Japan’s Yui Ohashi picked up double gold by sweeping the 200 IM and 400 IM.
  • Dutchman Arno Kamminga nailed double silver in the 100 breast and 200 breast.
  • South African Tatjana Schoenmaker first earned silver in the 100 breast before winning the 200 breast.
  • Ukrainian Mykhailo Romanchuk picked up two distance medals, 800 free bronze and 1500 free silver.
  • American Bobby Finke was the double men’s distance champion in the 800 free and 1500 free.
  • Another American, Hali Flickinger, earned two bronze in the 400 IM and 200 fly.

All of the named swimmers, and a plethora of others, had relay capabilities (or the mere presence of a relay spot) to their advantage when earning these medals. While Ledecky and Titmus earned three individual medals, they were able to earn a fourth medal simply swimming on a finals relay. Likewise, Zhang was able to pick up a second gold medal after being added to the 800 free relay following her 200 fly gold performance. Zhang also added another silver to her collection swimming on the mixed 400 medley relay after earning silver in a historically fast 100 fly final.

Notably, Aussies Mollie O’Callaghan and Brianna Throssell picked up three medals being prelims relay-only swimmers. O’Callaghan, who is 17 years old, became a two-time gold medalist contributing to the prelims 400 free/medley relays and earned bronze swimming prelims of the 800 free relay. Throssell was also a prelims 400 medley relay member, earning gold, as well as a prelims member of the bronze medal-winning 800 free relay and mixed 400 medley relay.

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Medals — By the Numbers

  • 208 Olympic medals were distributed in Tokyo 2020
  • 124 swimmers will walk away with at least one Olympic medal
  • 53 swimmers will walk away with two or more Olympic medals
  • 20 swimmers will walk away with THREE or more Olympic medals
  • 7 swimmers will walk away with FOUR or more Olympic medals
  • 60 swimmers will walk away with an Olympic BRONZE medal
  • 58 swimmers will walk away with an Olympic SILVER medal
  • 48 swimmers will walk away with an Olympic GOLD medal
  • 16 swimmers will walk away with TWO or more Olympic GOLD medals
  • 3 swimmers will walked away with THREE or more Olympic GOLD medals

Note: these totals don’t add to the same as the by-country medals table, which you can view here. Each prelims and finals swimmer on a relay is counted as 1 medal below, versus 1 medal in aggregate per country in the primary medals table. So, for example, the American women will receive 20 total medals for relays, which is reflected below. 

All Tokyo 2020 Olympic Swimming Medalists
Athlete Country Gold Silver Bronze TOTAL
Caeleb Dressel USA 5 0 0 5
Emma McKeon AUS 4 0 3 7
Kaylee Mckeown AUS 3 0 1 4
Zhang Yufei CHN 2 2 0 4
Katie Ledecky USA 2 2 0 4
Ariarne Titmus AUS 2 1 1 4
Adam Peaty GBR 2 1 0 3
James Guy GBR 2 1 0 3
Evgeny Rylov ROC 2 1 0 3
Mollie O’Callaghan AUS 2 0 1 3
Cate Campbell AUS 2 0 1 3
Tom Dean GBR 2 0 0 2
Yui Ohashi JPN 2 0 0 2
Zach Apple USA 2 0 0 2
Bobby Finke USA 2 0 0 2
Blake Pieroni USA 2 0 0 2
Duncan Scott GBR 1 3 0 4
Maggie MacNeil CAN 1 1 1 3
Ryan Murphy USA 1 1 1 3
Yang Junxuan CHN 1 1 0 2
Kristóf Milák HUN 1 1 0 2
Tatjana Schoenmaker RSA 1 1 0 2
Lydia Jacoby USA 1 1 0 2
Brianna Throssell AUS 1 0 2 3
Zac Stubblety-Cook AUS 1 0 1 2
Meg Harris AUS 1 0 1 2
Madison Wilson AUS 1 0 1 2
Bronte Campbell AUS 1 0 1 2
Emily Seebohm AUS 1 0 1 2
Li Bingjie CHN 1 0 1 2
Chelsea Hodges AUS 1 0 0 1
Tang Muhan CHN 1 0 0 1
Zhang Yifan CHN 1 0 0 1
Dong Jie CHN 1 0 0 1
Wang Shun CHN 1 0 0 1
Freya Anderson GBR 1 0 0 1
Matthew Richards GBR 1 0 0 1
Calum Jarvis GBR 1 0 0 1
Kathleen Dawson GBR 1 0 0 1
Anna Hopkin GBR 1 0 0 1
Ahmed Hafnaoui TUN 1 0 0 1
Brooks Curry USA 1 0 0 1
Andrew Wilson USA 1 0 0 1
Bowe Becker USA 1 0 0 1
Michael Andrew USA 1 0 0 1
Hunter Armstrong USA 1 0 0 1
Chase Kalisz USA 1 0 0 1
Tom Shields USA 1 0 0 1
Kylie Masse CAN 0 2 1 3
Regan Smith USA 0 2 1 3
Lilly King USA 0 2 1 3
Siobhan Haughey HKG 0 2 0 2
Arno Kamminga NED 0 2 0 2
Kyle Chalmers AUS 0 1 2 3
Penny Oleksiak CAN 0 1 2 3
Kayla Sanchez CAN 0 1 1 2
Taylor Ruck CAN 0 1 1 2
Luke Greenbank GBR 0 1 1 2
Thomas Ceccon ITA 0 1 1 2
Alessandro Miressi ITA 0 1 1 2
Kliment Kolesnikov ROC 0 1 1 2
Mykhaylo Romanchuk UKR 0 1 1 2
Erika Brown USA 0 1 1 2
Abbey Weitzeil USA 0 1 1 2
Allison Schmitt USA 0 1 1 2
Jack McLoughlin AUS 0 1 0 1
Rebecca Smith CAN 0 1 0 1
Yan Zibei CHN 0 1 0 1
Xu Jiayu CHN 0 1 0 1
Florent Manaudou FRA 0 1 0 1
James Wilby GBR 0 1 0 1
Manuel Frigo ITA 0 1 0 1
Lorenzo Zazzeri ITA 0 1 0 1
Santo Condorelli ITA 0 1 0 1
Gregorio Paltrinieri ITA 0 1 0 1
Tomoru Honda JPN 0 1 0 1
Ivan Girev ROC 0 1 0 1
Martin Malyutin ROC 0 1 0 1
Mikhail Vekovishchev ROC 0 1 0 1
Mikhail Dovgalyuk ROC 0 1 0 1
Aleksandr Krasnykh ROC 0 1 0 1
Sarah Sjöström SWE 0 1 0 1
Katie Mclaughlin USA 0 1 0 1
Emma Weyant USA 0 1 0 1
Brooke Forde USA 0 1 0 1
Erica Sullivan USA 0 1 0 1
Paige Madden USA 0 1 0 1
Bella Sims USA 0 1 0 1
Torri Huske USA 0 1 0 1
Claire Curzan USA 0 1 0 1
Rhyan White USA 0 1 0 1
Alex Walsh USA 0 1 0 1
Jay Litherland USA 0 1 0 1
Matthew Temple AUS 0 0 2 2
Zac Incerti AUS 0 0 2 2
Alexander Graham AUS 0 0 2 2
Nicolò Martinenghi ITA 0 0 2 2
Federico Burdisso ITA 0 0 2 2
Hali Flickinger USA 0 0 2 2
Brendon Smith AUS 0 0 1 1
Elijah Winnington AUS 0 0 1 1
Thomas Neill AUS 0 0 1 1
Isaac Cooper AUS 0 0 1 1
Leah Neale AUS 0 0 1 1
Tamsin Cook AUS 0 0 1 1
Mack Horton AUS 0 0 1 1
Cameron McEvoy AUS 0 0 1 1
Fernando Scheffer BRA 0 0 1 1
Bruno Fratus BRA 0 0 1 1
Sydney Pickrem CAN 0 0 1 1
Pernille Blume DEN 0 0 1 1
Matti Mattsson FIN 0 0 1 1
Sarah Köhler GER 0 0 1 1
Florian Wellbrock GER 0 0 1 1
Simona Quadarella ITA 0 0 1 1
Noè Ponti SUI 0 0 1 1
Jérémy Desplanches SUI 0 0 1 1
Kieran Smith USA 0 0 1 1
Catie Deloof USA 0 0 1 1
Kate Douglass USA 0 0 1 1
Natalie Hinds USA 0 0 1 1
Annie Lazor USA 0 0 1 1
Simone Manuel USA 0 0 1 1
Olivia Smoliga USA 0 0 1 1

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Monteswim
1 month ago

Did anyone from the American team not medal?!

Miss M
Reply to  Monteswim
1 month ago

Standouts who swam well but go home without medals include Katie Grimes (4th) and Phoebe Bacon (5th).

ACC
Reply to  Monteswim
1 month ago

I believe Bacon and Grimes were the only woman, and Fink, Mitchell, and Brinegar on the mens’ side

Last edited 1 month ago by ACC
Jackman
Reply to  ACC
1 month ago

Kibler, Callan, Seliskar?

ACC
Reply to  Jackman
1 month ago

Oh true. Forgot about the relay swimmers.

Zanna
Reply to  ACC
1 month ago

Mefford 4th and Zach Harting, Gunnar Bentz too.

Last edited 1 month ago by Zanna
Wave 1.5 Qualifier
Reply to  Zanna
1 month ago

and Haas makes 10.

Wave 1.5 Qualifier
Reply to  Monteswim
1 month ago

2 women and 10 men from team USA will be returning home without a medal.

Bruh
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

Curzan

Sub13
Reply to  Bruh
1 month ago

She got silver as a heat swimmer on the medley

Miss M
1 month ago

25/35 of the Australian team go home with a medal.

Mitch Larkin the biggest name going home empty handed!
Others are: Harkin, Strauch, Hansen, Matt Wilson, Melverton, Gough, Lee, Morgan, Hollard.

Sub13
Reply to  Miss M
1 month ago

12/35 with gold. 5/35 with multiple gold. 3/35 with multiple individual gold.

Just so proud of them!

Drama King
Reply to  Miss M
1 month ago

Larkin swam MMR prelims. Wasn’t he ?

Last edited 1 month ago by Drama King
Sub13
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

No, Cooper did.

BairnOwl
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

I wonder why they didn’t give that spot to Larkin, seeing as they had McKeown in the finals. More experience for the rookie?

Troyy
Reply to  Drama King
1 month ago

He was resting for hiis non-medal in the 200 im

Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

Yeah dropping the back for that was a mistake. Although I doubt he medals in the 200 back either tbh.

BairnOwl
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

He had a good chance if he could replicate his in-season 200 back swim. That’s a huge if though.

BairnOwl
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

He had already flamed out of the semis of the 200 IM the session prior to that, if I recall? Also, big oof to Larkin for missing the finals after all his talk about shooting for a gold medal.

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Miss M
1 month ago

Who had Seebohm medaling and the ex going home empty-handed on their bingo card?

Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

I recall there were several ties on the podium in Rio.
None for swimming in Tokyo, correct?

Hswimmer
Reply to  Wave 1.5 Qualifier
1 month ago

Correct

RobertB
1 month ago

The awesome young lady McKeon had a monster games but Dressel from US is the swimming star of these games. He looked ridiculously strong and far ahead compared to his competition. It didn’t hurt that he seemed a nice chap. He’ll be the face of swimming for these games.

BairnOwl
Reply to  RobertB
1 month ago

Dressel was amazing but I’m not so sure he was far ahead of his competition besides in the 50 free.

Yozhik
Reply to  BairnOwl
1 month ago

And 100FR. And 100BU

Sub13
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

You call winning by 0.06 “ridiculously far ahead”? Then what do you call the Aussie women winning the freestyle by 3.1 seconds?

Robbos
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

It’s Yozhil, he doesn’t see Chalmers as a swimmer.

HJones
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

He won the 100 FR by the skin of his teeth (0.06) and the 100 FL wasn’t exactly a decisive win either (0.23).

Sub13
Reply to  RobertB
1 month ago

Dressel was great. McKeon beat both the current world record holder and defending Olympic champion in all three of her individual events. She was the best or second best leg in all 4 of the relay finals she swam in. She broke an Olympic record in all 3 of her events, breaking the 50 free record three times. I really don’t think there’s anything more she could have done.

I can certainly see the argument for Dressel but Emma is the swimmer of the week for me.

swimmers758
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

5 Gold vs 4 Golds. I know math is an Aussie weak point.

Fraser Thorpe
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

The US are the ones using total medals as the metric. Dressel is listed as first on the above table and no one is arguing that. Sub13 puts forward a good point re Emma – and is framed as an opinion. The snark is totally uncalled for.

swimmers758
Reply to  Fraser Thorpe
1 month ago

No it’s not. Medal count isn’t relevant for swimmer of the meet when one has more golds. This isn’t hard chief.

Last edited 1 month ago by swimmers758
Sub13
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

By this logic then Mollie O’Callaghan with 2 gold and a bronze is a better swimmer than every US swimmer except Dressel and Ledecky.

Do you agree with that?

jim
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

If you agree that Dressel is better than Emma, and Ledecky is better than Titmus.

Sub13
Reply to  jim
1 month ago

It’s not a question that’s contingent on another answer. It’s a yes or no, based on the logic you’re using.

No I don’t necessarily agree that any of those swimmers are better or worse than the others, but I can see the arguments for all of them. All four of them had incredible weeks, winning multiple individual golds.

BillyBob
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

The swimming is over so I’m ready to stop the trash talk. They were clearly the top male and female. McKeon one day could be the top female sprinter in history.

swimmers758
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

I’m not done. Dressel won 5 golds McKeon won 4. Swimmer of the meet is Dressel. The Aussies are insufferable.

Aussie Crawl
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

#underachievedyankstokyo2020

swimmers758
Reply to  BillyBob
1 month ago

I could name about 15 females more deserving but she did well.

Sub13
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

I thought gold was all that matters? Emma has 5 golds, all in sprint events. Can you name 15 women with more than that?

Robbos
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

Go ahead Bro, name them!!!!

Sub13
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

I very clearly framed that as an opinion so there’s really no need to get nasty. If you want to believe that Dressel is the swimmer of the meet, then go for it. But Emma made history with her medal tally. Dressel didn’t even come close.

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

To be fair to Dressel, it’s hard to beat history when history is Michael Phelps…

Sub13

And the women’s history is the most notorious drug cheat in swimming history… and Emma STILL got more medals than her

anty75
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Its also Emma for me, not because of 7 medals but for swimming 51.7 100 Free in the mixed relay 7 minutes after her 50 Free semi. That was mind blowing) .

ooo
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

Terence Tao enters the chat

jim
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

Dressel was ridiculously strong, and far ahead of his competition–which is not to say that he was ridiculously far ahead of his competition. It is also not to say that he was far ahead of his competition in every event. It may be true that Emma was not good enough to finish better than third in the fly, but Dressel was and he did. The Aussies complain about Dressel winning the 100 fly by only 0.23, but don’t have a problem with Emma finishing third in the women’s version of the same event.

RobertB
Reply to  jim
1 month ago

That’s exactly what I inferred but it was kindly rewritten out of context above. You’ve probably said it best in all the responses. I find it funny there’s a +11/-44 rating on my comments. It clearly shows the vast majority of those rating are Australian because the debate isn’t that lopsided.

Sub13
Reply to  RobertB
1 month ago

I don’t think it’s about lopsided debate. This article is literally about Emma getting the most medals and it’s full of snarky comments saying Dressel is better. There is not one comment from an Aussie on the article about Dressel talking about Emma or criticising him

The problem is that Americans can’t handle thinking they’re not the best at something, and have to go comment “BUT WE’RE STILL BETTER THAN YOU” on any achievement another country makes. That probably explains all the downvotes.

torchbearer
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

And in their only head-to-head swim Emma touched the wall first ! 🙂

Joel
Reply to  torchbearer
1 month ago

Ha yes! Emma had 7 events, Dressel 6. Emma medaled in all her events.

Last edited 1 month ago by Joel
swimmers758
Reply to  Joel
1 month ago

And won less golds!

Lazy
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

This salt is hilarious please keep commenting

Personal Best
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

It’s “fewer golds” not “less golds” and stop being such a troll. You’re giving US swim fans a bad name.

Coach
Reply to  swimmers758
1 month ago

First of all my dude, it’s fewer. Second, as an American, just stop. We don’t have to be the best at everything. It’s going to be OK.

Swammer12
Reply to  torchbearer
1 month ago

Worst take in swimswam history! Grats you goof

Texas Tap Water
Reply to  Swammer12
1 month ago

How PETTY can you be?

swimmers758
Reply to  Texas Tap Water
1 month ago

from Texas Tap Water! Holy cow how hypocritical can you be? What a psycho

BairnOwl
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

I think it’s close. I might give the edge to Dressel due to the WR and win in the 100 fly. Isn’t it amazing that we’re comparing McKeon, who has been chronically underrated, to a titan of the pool and darling of the American media like Dressel? I’m just glad McKeon is getting her day in the spotlight.

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

As much as I love that Emma is finally getting her individual spotlight, still got to be Dressel for me.

McKeon beat both the current world record holder and defending Olympic champion in all three of her individual events.

Dressel technically beat all three defending Olympic champions lol (Chalmers, Schooling, Ervin at trials…) He didn’t beat any current WR holders, because in two of his events the WR holder is retired and in the third, Dressel can’t beat himself.

She was the best or second best leg in all 4 of the relay finals she swam in.

This is true, although I’d argue that her (and Titmus) underperforming in the 4×2 contributed to the Aussies missing gold. Dressel… Read more »

Sub13

I totally understand all those points. It’s obviously going to come down to a matter of opinion (I think it’s pretty clear my original comment was framed as an opinion), and that’s fine. But there’s not a single Aussie on the Dressel article comparing him to Emma or putting him down, and look at all the nasty comments on here attacking her and just saying blatantly racist stuff about Australia. That’s my main issue.

fmku
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

She didn’t break the 100fly OR, that would be the world record. I think 3 individual golds including a WR beats 2 golds + 1 bronze. IMO, relay medals only shows which country has the better meet, not comparable between swimmers.

Sub13
Reply to  fmku
1 month ago

Yes you’re right about the fly record. My mistake.

I can totally understand your point about relays, but you can’t just discount them. If Emma wasn’t going to swim four relays then she almost certainly doesn’t drop the 200 Free, and could have ended up with another medal there. If Dressel had swam the 200 relay the night before the 100 final like Kyle did, he might have been 0.06 slower.

Discounting relays completely misses the reality that individual stars have their schedules massively impacted by relay participation.

London
1 month ago

Realizing that there were setbacks to a couple of her key competitors that opened the door to gold, but it would be great to learn more details as to how McKeon–who never in her career medalled in a freestyle race shorter than 200m at the int’l level (and never won a freestyle race at that level) and who historically has had shoulder issues–became the fastest 50m and 100m swimmer in the world now at age 27. Wondering if there were any major training/trainer, coaching, nutritional changes, etc.

Sub13
Reply to  London
1 month ago

I’m sure SwimSwam will be clamouring to get her on the podcast! So hopefully we will find out.

She has already said she had a psychological change, and I believe she said she changed her training to focus more on the sprints.

Troyy
Reply to  London
1 month ago

It was a change of focus down to the 50 free. In the past she trained as a 200 freestyler that comes down to the 100. She also said in an interview the other day that she didn’t think she could compete in the 50 so she didn’t bother to train for it (having the Campbell sisters probably didn’t help this).

It really appears like season 1 of ISL motivated her to focus on sprinting.

I’m really curious to see her compete in the 50 free skins at ISL.

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyy
Gheko
Reply to  London
1 month ago

She won a 50m bronze at pan pack 2018

M d e
Reply to  London
1 month ago

No one was beating her in the 100.

Deepblue
1 month ago

God I’m so happy for Fratus

swimmers758
Reply to  Deepblue
1 month ago

That we can all agree on

DJTrockstoYMCA
1 month ago

Aussies are 2nd class Brits who maligned the Aboriginal Nation…American Is the best. Case closed!

Sub13
Reply to  DJTrockstoYMCA
1 month ago

LOL yes thankfully the first class Brits in America treated the native population really well

Aussie Crawl
Reply to  DJTrockstoYMCA
1 month ago

Obviously you failed history old mate.

John Smithson
Reply to  DJTrockstoYMCA
1 month ago

Its comments like yours that show your nation is in decline, you believe you are the best in everything when you simply are not. Your failure to believe anything other than, and I will use your words ” America is the best. Case closed!” is a testament to that.

GoCanada
1 month ago

Kylie Masse of Canada was also a multiple individual medal winner, silvers in the 100m and 200m back.

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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