2024 W. NCAAs: Watch Gretchen Walsh Crush a 47.42 100 Butterfly (Day 3 Race Videos)

2024 WOMEN’S NCAA SWIMMING AND DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

[intro]

400 Individual Medley — Final

Courtesy: ugaswimming

  • NCAA Record: 3:54.60, Ella Eastin (Stanford) – 2018
  • Meet Record: 3:54.60, Ella Eastin (Stanford) – 2018
  • American Record: 3:54.60, Ella Eastin (Stanford) – 2018
  • US Open Record: 3:54.60, Ella Eastin (Stanford) – 2018
  • Pool Record: 3:59.26, Elizabeth Beisel (Florida) – 2014
  • 2023 Champion: Alex Walsh (Virginia) – 3:57.24

Top 8:

  1. Alex Walsh (Virginia) — 3:55.97 *Pool Record* 
  2. Emma Weyant (Florida) — 3:59.00
  3. Lucy Bell (Stanford) — 4:01.23
  4. Caroline Bricker (Stanford) — 4:02.14
  5. Megan Van Berkom (Minnesota) — 4:02.51
  6. Ella Nelson (Virginia) — 4:04.33
  7. Zoe Dixon (Florida) — 4:04.93
  8. Paige Maceachern (UCLA) — 4:08.95

In the 200 IM yesterday, Alex Walsh became the second-fastest swimmer in history. She replicated that here in the 400 IM, vaulting from 6th to be only behind Ella Eastin‘s NCAA record performance.

Walsh was ahead of Eastin’s pace through the middle of the race but fell off during the freestyle leg. Still, she split 54.12/58.91/1:06.67/56.27 en route to her title in a speedy 3:55.97.

Emma Weyant posted a personal best 4:00.98 in prelims. She smashed that time in the final by 1.98 seconds, breaking 4:00 for the first time in her career and taking 2nd place.

Stanford had a strong showing in the final, earning 3rd and 4th courtesy of sophomore Lucy Bell and freshman Caroline Bricker. Both swam personal bests.

100 Butterfly — Final

Courtesy: ugaswimming

Top 8:

  1. Gretchen Walsh (Virginia) — 47.42 *New Everything Record* 
  2. Emma Sticklen (Texas) — 49.70
  3. Olivia Bray (Texas) — 50.52
  4. Kelly Pash (Virginia) — 50.55
  5. Meghan Lee (Auburn) — 50.72
  6. Olivia Peoples (Florida) — 50.93
  7. Gigi Johnson (Stanford) — 50.99
  8. Mia Kragh (California) — 51.27

Even compiling these race videos, I’m still having a hard time believing that just happened. Gretchen Walsh obliterated all her records in the 100 butterfly, storming past her old NCAA record (48.25) and the 48-second barrier with an incredible 47.42.

Walsh popped up after her start half a body length ahead of the field. She turned at the 25-yard mark in 9.94, and hit the halfway point in a blistering 21.75. She split 25.67 on the way home to her history-making 47.42.

Walsh won the race by well over two seconds. Emma Sticklen led a 2-3-4 finish for the Texas Longhorns with a new personal best of 49.70, shaving a few hundredths off her prelims PB. Olivia Bray took 3rd, out-touching teammate Kelly Pash by three-hundredths. Last year, Pash raced the 200 freestyle on Day 3.

200 Freestyle — Final

Courtesy: ugaswimming

  • NCAA Record: 1:39.10, Missy Franklin (California) – 2015
  • Meet Record: 1:39.10, Missy Franklin (California) – 2015
  • American Record: 1:39.10, Missy Franklin (California) – 2015
  • US Open Record: 1:39.10, Missy Franklin (California) – 2015
  • Pool Record: 1:41.23, Missy Franklin (California) – 2014
  • 2023 Champion: Taylor Ruck (Stanford) – 1:42.36

Top 8:

  1. Bella Sims (Florida) — 1:40.90 *Pool Record*
  2. Anna Peplowski (Indiana) — 1:40.97
  3. Minna Abraham (USC) — 1:41.96
  4. Aimee Canny (Virginia) — 1:42.33
  5. Chloe Stepanek (Texas A&M) — 1:42.92
  6. Kayla Wilson (Stanford) — 1:43.23
  7. Isabel Ivey (Florida) — 1:43.79

DQ: Camille Spink (False Start)

It came down to the touch between Bella Sims and Anna Peplowski. They each attacked the race differently; Sims jumped out to the lead and turned in 48.90 at the 100-yard mark. She was the only person in the field out in under 49 seconds.

The field began to creep up on her during the third 50 with three swimmers outsplitting Sims. Peplowski has showcased her strong back half throughout these championships. She continued to eat into Sims’ lead over the final 50 yards. At the touch, Sims held on by seven-hundredths winning 1:40.90 to 1:40.97. Sims equalled her season-best while Peplowski’s time marked her first sub-1:41 outing.

USC’s Minna Abraham earned third. The Hungarian freshman 1:41.96, getting back under 1:42 for the first time since her 1:41.38 at the Texas Invitational.

100 Breaststroke — Final

Courtesy: ugaswimming

  • NCAA Record: 55.73, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • Meet Record: 55.73, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • American Record: 55.73, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • US Open Record: 55.73, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • Pool Record: 56.76, Mona McSharry (Tennessee) – 2024
  • 2023 Champion: Lydia Jacoby (Texas) – 57.03

Top 8:

  1. Jasmine Nocentini (Virginia) — 56.09 *Pool Record*
  2. Mona McSharry (Tennesee) — 56.64
  3. Kaitlyn Dobler (USC) — 56.67
  4. Anna Elendt (Texas) — 57.01
  5. Lydia Jacoby (Texas) — 57.13
  6. Hannah Bach (Ohio State) — 57.40
  7. Josie Panitz (Ohio State) — 58.38
  8. Stasya Makarova (Auburn) — 58.94

Jasmine Nocentini was out first at the 50, turning in 26.24. However, was on the final 25 yards that she exploded. She split 15.03 on the last 25 yards, dropping the hammer to win her first individual NCAA title in 56.09. Nocentini broke 57 seconds for the first time in prelims with a 56.96, taking lane 5 for the final. She just blew past that time by .90 seconds, becoming the 2nd fastest performer in history.

Mona McSharry and Kaitlyn Dobler also climbed the all-time performers list with their personal bests en route to 2nd and 3rd place. McSharry dropped .12 seconds from her prelims personal best to move into a tie with Molly Hannis for 3rd all-time, while Dobler took over possession of the 5th spot in 56.67.

100 Backstroke — Final

Courtesy: ugaswimming

Top 8:

  1. Katharine Berkoff (NC State) — 48.55 *Pool Record*
  2. Isabelle Stadden (California) — 50.47
  3. Kennedy Noble (NC State) — 50.54
  4. Phoebe Bacon (Wisconsin) — 50.55
  5. Josephine Fuller (Tennessee) — 50.56
  6. Kacey McKenna (Indiana) — 50.65
  7. Celia Pulido (SIU) — 50.73
  8. Miranda Grana (Texas A&M) — 51.65

Katharine Berkoff dominated the 100 backstroke final, earning the win in a new personal best of 48.55. That surpasses the 48.70 personal best she swam to win her fifth ACC 100 backstroke title. This win here earns her her third NCAA 100 backstroke title at her final NCAAs.

Isabelle Stadden won a close race for 2nd place in 50.47. Right behind her, third through fifth were separated by just .02 seconds. Kennedy Noble made it a 1-3 finish for the Wolfpack, getting the better of Phoebe Bacon and Josephine Fuller.

400 Medley Relay — Final

Courtesy: uvaswimming

  • NCAA Record: 3:21.80, Virginia (G. Walsh, A. Walsh, K. Douglass, A. Canny) — 2023
  • Meet Record: 3:22.34, Virginia (G. Walsh, A. Wenger, A. Walsh, K. Douglass) — 2022
  • American Record: 3:22.34, Virginia (G. Walsh, A. Wenger, A. Walsh, K. Douglass) — 2022
  • U.S. Open Record: 3:21.80, Virginia (G. Walsh, A. Walsh, K. Douglass, A. Canny) — 2023
  • Pool Record: 3:27.84, Virginia (C. Bartholomew, L. Simon, E. Williamson, E. Thomas) — 2014
  • 2023 Champion: 3:22.39, Virginia (G. Walsh, A. Walsh, K. Douglass, A. Canny)

Top 8:

  1. Virginia (G. Walsh, J. Nocentini, A. Walsh, M. Parker) — 3:21.01 *NCAA, Meet, U.S. Open, Pool Records*
  2. Texas (B. Berglund, A. Elendt, E. Sticklen, K. Pash) — 3:24.92
  3. Tennessee (J. Fuller, M. McSharry, S. Stotler, C. Spink) — 3:25.39
  4. Florida — 3:25.64
  5. USC — 3:25.76
  6. NC State — 3:27.12
  7. Duke — 3:28.71
  8. California — 3:28.91

The Virginia women broke their own NCAA, Meet, U.S. Open, and Pool Records to close out an exceptional day of racing. Three of their four relay legs won individual NCAA titles during this session: G. Walsh, Nocentini, and A. Walsh.

G. Walsh clocked a 48.26 100 backstroke with a long finish, handing Nocentini the lead and clean water. Nocentini extended the lead with a 56.34 100 breast split that makes her the 3rd fastest performer in a rolling 100 breaststroke. She handed off to the 400 IM champion A. Walsh. She almost matched her split from 2024 ACCs with a 49.15, which just continued to extend UVA’s lead. Maxine Parker brought them home in 47.26, stopping the clock at 3:21.01 and obliterating the NCAA record by .79 seconds.

It was a battle for second place behind Virginia’s record-breaking effort. Texas moved into 2nd place during Sticklen’s butterfly leg where she split 49.67. Pash held on for the Longhorns on the anchor, giving them 2nd place in 3:24.92. Tennessee held of Florida in a repeat of the SEC 400 medley final, taking 3rd place in 3:25.39.

Scores Thru Day 3

  1. Virginia — 360.5
  2. Texas — 319
  3. Florida — 267
  4. Tennessee — 185
  5. Stanford — 177
  6. USC — 157
  7. Indiana — 138
  8. Louisville — 136
  9. NC State — 114
  10. California — 110
  11. Ohio State — 104
  12. Michigan — 102.5
  13. Georgia — 83
  14. Texas A&M — 79
  15. UNC — 76
  16. Wisconsin – 58
  17. Duke — 57
  18. Auburn — 49
  19. Minnesota — 27
  20. UCLA — 26
  21. LSU/Purdue/Utah/Alabama — 19
  22. (tie)
  23. (tie)
  24. (tie)
  25. SIU — 12
  26. Arizona State — 11
  27. Northwestern — 8
  28. Kansas — 6
  29. Notre Dame/Virginia Tech/Rutgers/Miami (OH) — 6
  30. (tie)
  31. (tie)
  32. (tie)
  33. Cincinatti/Florida State — 4
  34. (tie)
  35. Houston/Miami (FL) — 3
  36. (tie)
  37. Akron — 2
  38. Arkansas — 1

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Sherry Smit
2 months ago

She breaths on every stroke in the 100 fly. It’s so funny to watch how she still goes 47.4. Amazinf

John26
2 months ago

I wasn’t a true believer til this swim. Gretchen will be Olympic champion in the 100fly (and WR holder)

dg5301
Reply to  John26
2 months ago

I’d love to see it happen and I think she definitely will drop time in her LC events, but this is 19 strokes of fly and almost 60 meters underwater.

HOO love
2 months ago

Looking at the race video it’s not super clear how Camille Spink false started

VA Steve
Reply to  HOO love
2 months ago

She flinches before the start in a minor way — certainly many of these types of movements go uncalled.

RevSticky
Reply to  HOO love
2 months ago

I got a little twitchy watching Alex’s BA to BR turn …

Derp
2 months ago

She going 44 high in the free

Boxall's Railing
2 months ago

Camera angle painfully far away in these YT vids – makes super fast swims look slow. Not as bad as flying on a plane watching someone swim below, but not exactly Poolside Perspective either.

dg5301
Reply to  Boxall's Railing
2 months ago

Here’s the broadcast video of the 100 fly, complete with Rowdy losing his mind. I believe he has clips of several other races as well.

https://twitter.com/ButtstrokeSwim/status/1771305034187424156

Joe
2 months ago

Rowdy and AVD will still say she had a bad start

Stewart Fenwick
Reply to  Joe
2 months ago

Olympics gold medalists can be so clueless.

saltie
2 months ago

this lowers the previous american record by the exact same amount that Dressel did. 47.42 to KD’s 48.46 is identical to Dressel’s 42.80 and Sheild’s 43.84.

1.04 gap for both is absolutely insane… and a cool coincidence

However, for Gretchen that includes NCAA and American record, for Dressel that’s just American because Sheilds went 43.8 out of college at 2016 winter nats.
The NCAA record before Dressel was 44.08 which was with a supersuit. In other words, he lowered the NC record by more than GW.

So basically, in summary, both Caeleb and Gretchen are the GOATs of SCY, but if you have to pick one, Dressel is still statistically far more impressive. Lets not forget that… Read more »

Joe
Reply to  saltie
2 months ago

Gretchen could also win 7+ individual events at NCAA and probably break the records in all of them

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  saltie
2 months ago

44.01 by Joe Schooling. Staab was 44.18 with a super suit prior to Schooling taking that record in 2016.

jeff
Reply to  saltie
2 months ago

Strictly comparing to the #2 time is such a reductive way to look at it, although in any case, Schooling held the #2 time ever at 43.75 anyway which was “only 0.95 slower than Dressel’s time.

I mentioned this elsewhere but comparing to the a larger group of top swimmers is much more resilient than your method is to potential outliers. I’ll use the 5th through 15th fastest swimmers as an example: on the women’s side the times range from 49.24 to 50.05, while on the men’s side (before the end of 2018 NCAAs) they range from 44.35 to 44.87.

If you compare that way instead, Gretchen’s swim is just as impressive or perhaps even more impressive. Only… Read more »

LBSWIM
Reply to  saltie
2 months ago

I struggle with GOAT of yards. No doubt she’s there. But Natalie Coughlin. 100/200 free/fly/back American records. 20+ years later and she’s still top 3 in her events.

Age Of Winters
Reply to  saltie
2 months ago

The 50 record was 18.47 by Cielo.

Swemmer (GO DRESSEL)
2 months ago

We NEED Gretchen to clutch up in LCM or else

Last edited 2 months ago by Swemmer (GO DRESSEL)
Swimmer.thingz
Reply to  Swemmer (GO DRESSEL)
2 months ago

Yeah let’s see her do something in the real pool

About Sophie Kaufman

Sophie Kaufman

Sophie grew up in Boston, Massachusetts, which means yes, she does root for the Bruins, but try not to hold that against her. At 9, she joined her local club team because her best friend convinced her it would be fun. Shoulder surgery ended her competitive swimming days long ago, …

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