2024 NSW State Open Championships: Day 2 Prelims Live Recap

2024 NEW SOUTH WALES STATE OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS

The second prelim session of the 2024 New South Wales State Open Championships is a packed one, featuring 10 different events. We’ll see action in the women’s 400 free, men’s 50 fly, women’s 100 fly, men’s 200 free, women’s 100 back, men’s 100 breast, women’s 200 breast, men’s 200 back, women’s 50 free, and men’s 200 IM.

Ariarne Titmus (400 free), Kaylee McKeown (100 fly & 100 back), Mollie O’Callaghan (100 back & 50 free), and Emma McKeon (100 fly & 50 free) will be among the competitors, and will almost certainly lay down some fast markers during tonight’s finals session.

WOMEN’S 400 FREESTYLE – HEATS

Top 10 Qualifiers: 

  1. Lani Pallister (GUSC) – 4:06.44
  2. Ariarne Titmus (STPET) – 4:11.88
  3. Jamie Perkins (STPET) – 4:13.06
  4. Amelia Weber (STPET) – 4:16.76
  5. Lia Belle Wiese (USCS) – 4:17.42
  6. Georgie Roper (MIAMI) – 4:17.67
  7. Jacqueline Davison-McGovern (STPET) – 4:18.34
  8. Chelsea Jones (MIAMI) – 4:22.79
  9. Tayla Martin (CARL) – 4:25.44
  10. Macy Beuzeville (STPET) – 4:25.45

Lani Pallister, who trains under the guidance of her mother Janelle Pallister and legendary coach Michael Bohl, posted the fastest time of the morning. She finished her race in 4:06.44, leading from start to finish in the 2nd heat. She took the race out strongly through the first 100 meters, flipping in 58.95 before hitting the 200 wall in 2:01.18. She closed the final 200 meters in 2:05.26, highlighted by the fastest final 50 of the morning (30.86).

Pallister was runner-up to Ariarne Titmus in last night’s 800 free final, where she put her hand on the wall in 8:19.23. After being a bit off her best at the Fukuoka World Championships in July, Pallister posted some scorching times during the October World Cup circuit. There, Pallister checked-in with new personal bests in the 400 (4:02.07), and 800 (8:15.11) freestyles. The 800 swim represented a new World Cup record.

After winning the 800 freestyle on Thursday in 8:17.87, a time that is 1.46 seconds quicker than she was at this point last year, Ariarne Titmus posted the 2nd fastest morning effort. The Dean Boxall-trained freestyle ace hit the wall in 4:11.88 to win heat one, touching just about a second ahead of teammate Jamie Perkins (4:13.06). Perkins won the World Junior title in this event back in September, where she clocked in at 4:05.72.

Titmus reclaimed her world record in this 400m distance at last July, where she clocked 3:55.38 to win the 2023 World title. Titmus’ season best time rests at the 4:04.25 that she produced at December’s Queensland Championships, and after her impressive 800 free performance from last night, look for her to challenge the 4:01.94 that she produced at this meet a year ago.

Of note, St. Peters Western will represent half of the ‘A’ finalists tonight, further showcasing the freestyle prowess that they’ve showed over the past few years. 18-year-old Amelia Weber is one of those finalists, and she was 4th in the 200 free and 7th in the 400 at the previously mentioned World Junior Championships.

MEN’S 50 BUTTERFLY – HEATS

  • World Record: 22.27, Andriy Govorov (2018)
  • Australian Record: 22.73, Matt Targett (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record: 22.73, Matt Targett (2009)

Top 10 Qualifiers: 

  1. Ben Armbruster (BOND) – 23.64
  2. Matthew Temple (MARI) – 23.80
  3. Shaun Champion (ABBT) – 24.08
  4. Jesse Coleman (BOND) – 24.13
  5. Cody Simpson (GUSC) – 24.20
  6. Jack Carr (STAND) – 24.25
  7. Joseph Hamson (KPSC) – 24.50
  8. Alex Quach (SOSC) – 24.55
  9. Jonathan Kling (SWDN) – 24.56
  10. Zach Maher (CARL) – 24.75

Chris Mooney-trained Ben Armbruster turned in the swiftest 50 butterfly result of the morning. Winning heat one with a time of 23.64, the 21-year-old was one of two athletes to dip under 24 seconds. The other was Matthew Temple, who won the 2nd heat in a solid 23.80.

Shaun Champion (24.08), Jesse Coleman (24.13), and Cody Simpson (24.20) qualified 3rd through 5th, with all safely advancing.

The final tonight will serve as a fun preview for tomorrow’s 100 fly, where all five men are in with a chance to make the Olympic team come June. Temple is the clear frontrunner to win the Australian Olympic Trials in the 100 meter distance, as he’s broken through over the past few months with multiple sub-51 swims. Behind Temple though, a loaded field is charging for the 2nd spot.

Bowen Gough, who swam to victory during day one’s 200 fly final, finished 14th this morning (24.91). This 50 sprint isn’t really his forte compared to the longer distance, but it’s still worth noting.

17 athletes dipped under 25 seconds this morning, so both the ‘A’ and ‘B’ finals look to showcase some exciting racing later today.

Kyle Chalmers, after finishing 2nd in yesterday’s 100 free final, did not swim as scheduled.

WOMEN’S 100 BUTTERFLY – HEATS

  • World Record – 55.48, Sarah Sjostrom (2016)
  • Australian Record – 55.72, Emma McKeon (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record – 55.59, Maggie MacNeil (2021)

Top 10 Qualifiers: 

  1. Emma McKeon (GUSC) – 57.84
  2. Alexandria Perkins (USCS) – 58.35
  3. Isabella Boyd (NUN) – 59.25
  4. Bella Grant (TRGR) – 59.88
  5. Brittany Castelluzzo (TTG) – 59.91
  6. Madeline Groves (COMM) – 59.93
  7. Mikayla Bird (BOND) – 1:00.53
  8. Lillie McPherson (MNLY) – 1:01.97
  9. Rafaela Kopellou (SOSC) – 1:02.24
  10. Claudia Fydler (BOND) – 1:03.25

The first heat saw veteran Emma McKeon score victory, as the 29-year-old Commonwealth record holder hit a prelim mark of 57.84. She opened in 27.09 before closing in a fast 30.75, and will have the opportunity to challenge the 56.40 that she threw down at last month’s Victorian Championships. McKeon was slightly off her times from that meet in both the 50 fly (25.99) and 100 free (53.46) yesterday, but it’s worth nothing that she had quite a long finish during that 56.40 swim.

Kaylee McKeown was scheduled to compete along McKeon in heat one, but did not show up for the race. McKeown touched the wall in 2:04.21 to win yesterday’s 200 back final, which represents the 10th fastest swim of all-time. She raced this 100 fly last year at this same competition, but only swam the heats. She owns a best time of 59.45 to her name, and is slated to feature in the 100 back later today.

The 50 fly champion from yesterday, Alexandria Perkins, claimed runner-up status heading into the championship final. The 23-year-old put her hands on the wall in 58.35, less than a second off her best time of 57.48.

Isabella Boyd (59.25), Bella Grant (59.88), Brittany Castelluzzo (59.91), and Madeline Groves (59.93) all logged sub-60 swims for 3rd through 6th this morning. Junior phenom Olivia Wunsch opted not to compete today, and she also dropped out of the 50 fly and 100 free yesterday.

Brianna Throssell and Lily Price, two of the other top contenders for this event at the upcoming Olympic Trials, are not present in Sydney. Throssell has resumed training since returning from the February World Championships, while Price opted to compete at last week’s Brisbane Metro Championships. 21-year-old Price, who trains under Damien Jones at Rackley, punched a new best time of 57.64 at that meet.

MEN’S 200 FREESTYLE – HEATS

  • World Record: 1:42.00, Paul Biedermann (2009)
  • Australian Record: 1:44.06, Ian Thorpe (2001)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:44.06, Ian Thorpe (2001)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Flynn Southam (BOND) – 1:49.04
  2. Noah Millard (MLC) – 1:49.22
  3. Josha Salchow (GER) – 1:49.34
  4. Alexander Graham (MIAMI) – 1:49.41
  5. Wesley Roberts (SOSC) – 1:49.79
  6. Maximillian Giuliani (MIAMI) – 1:49.99
  7. James Koch (MIAMI) – 1:50.26
  8. Marcus Da Silva (CRAN) – 1:50.95
  9. Zac Incerti (USCS) – 1:51.16
  10. Silas Harris (NUN) – 1:51.29

21-year-old Noah Millard stole the show from Maximillian Giuliani in heat one, touching in 1:49.22 to secure victory. Giuliani finished in 1:49.99, with both swimmers advancing to the final tonight. Junior Pan Pacific Champion in the distance events, Joshua Staples, checked-in at 1:52.83 for 4th in the heat, missing the ‘A’ final. Millard’s time held up for the 2nd fastest of the day, with Giuliani ranking 6th.

The fastest time of the morning came from Bond’s Flynn Southam, who finished ahead of the field in heat two (1:49.04). Southam opened in 52.62 before closing in 56.42. Josha Salchow (1:49.34), Alexander Graham (1:49.41), and Wesley Roberts (1:49.79) also recorded sub-1:50 clockings, all advancing to the tightly-bunched final.

Australia’s depth has really accelerated in this event over the past year, particularly with the rise of Maximillian Giuliani (1:44.79 scorcher from December), improvements of Kai Taylor (1:45.79 best time from 2023 Worlds), and the return to form of Tommy Neill (1:45.78 near best time in December). Elijah Winnington and Kyle Chalmers have been mainstays on the national scene, with veterans Alexander Graham and Zac Incerti also being contenders come Trials. Clyde Lewis recently rejoined the St. Peters Western squad, training under Dean Boxall, who coached him to his best time of 1:44.90 in 2019.

Chalmers and Lewis are both at this meet, but Chalmers dropped the 200 free while Lewis was never entered in it. Taylor is opting to skip this meet in favor of training, as he recently competed at the Doha World Championships. Neill, like teammate Price, opted to swim at last week’s Brisbane Metro meet. Neill hit the wall in 1:48.11 for the 200 free last week, for reference. Come Paris, the Dolphins will be a big-time medal threat in the 4×200 free relay if they stay on their current course of improvements.

Top 5 Australian Men’s LCM 200 Freestyle Performers All-Time:

  1. Ian Thorpe – 1:44.06, 2001
  2. Maximillian Giuliani – 1:44.79, 2023
  3. Clyde Lewis – 1:44.90, 2019
  4. Thomas Fraser-Holmes – 1:45.08, 2014
  5. Alex Graham – 1:45.22, 2021

WOMEN’S 100 BACKSTROKE – HEATS

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Mollie O’Callaghan (STPET) – 59.48
  2. Kaylee McKeown (GUSC) – 59.85
  3. Layla Day (BOND) – 1:01.52
  4. Helena Gasson (CSCAK) – 1:01.65
  5. Minna Atherton (BOND) – 1:02.12
  6. Olivia Lefoe (NUN) – 1:02.35
  7. Abbey Webb (CRUIZ) – 1:02.73
  8. Emma Godwin (SUNHP) – 1:02.78
  9. Ingeborg Loeyning (NOR) – 1:02.87
  10. Meg Senior (CRUIZ) – 1:02.95

World record holder Kaylee McKeown cruised to victory in heat one this morning. She put up a time of 59.85, splitting 28.97/30.88 en route to the comfortable heat win.

Mollie O’Callaghan, who holds the world record in the 200 free, was fastest this morning. She touched in 59.48 to lead heat two, recording splits of 29.19 and 30.29 during her swim. O’Callaghan owns a best time of 58.42 in the event, which she recorded on two occasions during the 2023 season.

Two other swimmers were under 1:02, with Layla Day (1:01.52) of Bond leading 29-year-old Helena Gasson (1:01.65). Gasson represents New Zealand on the international scene.

23-year-old Minna Atherton, who holds the short course world record in this event, was the 4th fastest qualifier in 1:02.12. She won silver in this event at the 2019 World Championships, which were held in Gwangju, South Korea.

It took a sub-1:03 time to make tonight’s ‘A’ final, and exactly ten swimmers did so.

MEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE – HEATS

  • World Record – 56.88, Adam Peaty (2019)
  • Australian Record – 58.58, Brenton Rickard (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record – 56.88, Adam Peaty (2019)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Matthew Wilson (SOSC) – 1:01.19
  2. Joshua Collett (BOND) – 1:01.71
  3. Haig Buckingham (SOSC) – 1:02.10
  4. Adam Selwood (PROP) – 1:02.30
  5. Gideon Burnes (BOND) – 1:02.44
  6. Angus Menzies (KPSC) – 1:03.15
  7. Joshua Anderson (BGRAM) – 1:03.46
  8. Calvin Reed (PROP) – 1:03.91
  9. Joshua Seignior (PROP) – 1:04.29
  10. Wilrich Coetzee (CSCAK) – 1:04.38

After ripping a new best time in the 50 breast prelims (27.30) yesterday, former 200 breast world record holder Matthew Wilson led all qualifiers this morning. Wilson checked-in at 1:01.19, one of two swimmers to finish in the 1:01 range.

Joshua Collett of Bond was the other, touching in 1:01.71. Collett won the 50 breast last night, where Wilson scratched the final, with a time of 27.86. Collett holds a best time of 1:00.44 in this 100 meter sprint, and the 20-year-old may be targeting a sub-1:01 swim later today.

Wilson’s training partner, Haig Buckingham, who’s been on a great improvement curve, was 3rd this morning (1:02.10). Buckingham has been on the cusp of breaking one minute for about a year, and he owns a best time of 1:00.33.

WOMEN’S 200 BREASTSTROKE – HEATS

  • World Record: 2:17.55, Evgeniia Chukinova (2023)
  • Australian Record: 2:20.54, Leisel Jones (2006)
  • Commonwealth Record: 2:18.95, Tatjana Schoenmaker (2021)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Matilda Smith (MIAMI) – 2:25.48
  2. Jenna Strauch (MIAMI) – 2:26.75
  3. Tara Kinder (MVC) – 2:31.74
  4. Zoe Deacon (NUN) – 2:32.30
  5. Ashleigh Oberekar (MIAMI) – 2:32.33
  6. Mia Feltham (GUSC) – 2:32.71
  7. Emily Nobbs (CRUIZ) – 2:32.81
  8. Isabelle Rae (ALBU) – 2:33.56
  9. Reidel Smith (NUN) – 2:33.96
  10. Sienna Toohey (ALBU) – 2:34.65

Richard Scarce‘s Miami breaststroke crew got the job done this morning, securing 3 of the top 5 times. 19-year-old Matilda Smith led the way, finishing her race in 2:25.48. Smith scorched a time of 2:24.34 at the Japan Open in November, which inserted herself into the conversation to make the Olympic team in June.

Jenna Strauch, who touched 2nd this morning in 2:26.75, will be the frontrunner come Trials, along with Abbey Harkin, if she can regain her breaststroke form.

Strauch won the silver medal in this distance at the 2022 Budapest World Championships, and owns a best time of 2:22.22 from that same meet.

15-year-old Sienna Toohey, who’s been surging in the 100m distance, was 10th this morning in 2:34.65. She broke 1:08 in the 100 yesterday, almost touching out Strauch in the process.

MEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE – HEATS

  • World Record: 1:51.92, Aaron Piersol (2009)
  • Australian Record: 1:53.17, Mitch Larkin (2015)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:53.17, Mitch Larkin (2015)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Joshua Edwards-Smith (GUSC) – 1:59.94
  2. Marius Boll (CARL) – 2:00.97
  3. Alexander Foreman (KPD) – 2:03.71
  4. Evan Chee (NUN) – 2:04.12
  5. Matthew Magnussen (STPET) – 2:04.30
  6. Sam Brown (CSCAK) – 2:04.67
  7. Caleb Dryer (TRGR) – 2:04.79
  8. Se-bom Lee (SOSC) – 2:04.88
  9. Will Sharp (NUN) – 2:05.30
  10. Callum Thomas (THIL) – 2:06.00

Griffith’s Joshua Edwards-Smith finished in 1:59.94 to clear the men’s 200 back field, the only sub-2:00 time of the morning. Edwards-Smith, who trains alongside world record holder Kaylee McKeown under Michael Bohl, has been as quick as 1:55.42 in the event.

Edwards-Smith missed out on making the World Championship team in 2023, despite that 1:55.42 clocking earlier in the year. He was 2nd to Bradley Woodward at the Trials, ultimately touching in 1:57.29.

Marius Boll (2:00.97) was the closest competitor to Edwards-Smith this morning, clearing the rest of the field by almost three seconds.

WOMEN’S 50 FREESTYLE – HEATS

  • World Record: Sarah Sjostrom, 23.61 (2023)
  • Australian Record: Cate Campbell, 23.78 (2018)
  • Commonwealth Record: Cate Campbell, 23.78 (2018)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. Bronte Campbell (CRUIZ) – 24.75
  2. Emma McKeon (GUSC) – 24.84
  3. Milla Jansen (BOND) – 25.17
  4. Mollie O’Callaghan (STPET) – 25.18
  5. Mia O’Leary (BOND) – 25.44
  6. Chloe Rowe-Hagans (STAND) – 25.82
  7. Hannah Casey (BOND) – 25.92
  8. Abbey Webb (CRUIZ) – 25.98
  9. Ainsley Trotter (BOND) – 25.98
  10. Dijana Mazumdar (BAQU) – 26.21

2015 World Champion Bronte Campbell was the fastest 50m swimmer during prelims. C2 claimed victory in her heat with a time of 24.75, with Emma McKeon (24.84) ranking 2nd overall heading into tonight. McKeon will also line-up for the 100 fly final in a few hours time.

Both swimmers will be among the top contenders when Olympic Trials take place in June, with Shayna Jack, Meg Harris, and Cate Campbell (C1) also in the hunt.

After qualifying 1st in the women’s 100 back over an hour ago, Mollie O’Callaghan qualified for her 2nd ‘A’ final of the day. She posted the 4th fastest effort in 25.18, and owns a best time of 24.52 in the event. O’Callaghan has shifted focus from this event ever since the 2019 World Junior Championships, but her PB does come from 2022 despite not targeting it much.

World Juniors medalist Hannah Casey was 7th this morning, sprinting to a morning performance of 25.92. She now trains under Chris Mooney at Bond.

MEN’S 200 IM – HEATS

  • World Record: 1:54.00, Ryan Lochte (2011)
  • Australian Record: 1:55.72, Mitch Larkin (2019)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:55.28, Duncan Scott (2021)

Top 10 Qualifiers:

  1. William Petric (NUN) – 2:01.38
  2. Marco Soesanto (MVC) – 2:03.83
  3. Brendon Smith (GUSC) – 2:05.13
  4. Clyde Lewis (STPET) – 2:05.48
  5. Jamie Mooney (WGAA) – 2:05.62
  6. Samuel Higgs (WASC) – 2:06.00
  7. Gabriel Gorgas (KPSC) – 2:06.88
  8. Joshua Kerr (MNLY) – 2:06.93
  9. Karl Albertyn (MIAMI) – 2:07.99
  10. Remy Lennon (WASC) – 2:08.14

Nunawading’s William Petric hit the wall in 2:01.38 for the men’s 200 IM, the fastest time of the morning by about 2.5 seconds. Petric swam a well-rounded race, highlighted by a fast 33.48 breaststroke split. Known for his breaststroke, Petric also has a great butterfly, and he placed 2nd in yesterday’s 200 fly (1:58.45).

Marco Soesanto (2:03.83) was 2nd this morning, with international medalists Brendon Smith (2:05.13) and Clyde Lewis (2:05.48) the next fastest qualifiers. Smith won bronze at the Tokyo Olympics in the 400m IM distance, while Lewis won the Commonwealth 400 IM title in 2018. After 2018, Lewis transitioned to more of a freestyle focus, culminating with a time of 1:44.90 in the 200 free, ranking him 3rd on the all-time Aussie list.

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tashswam
2 months ago

What I think is crazy is that if Mckeown were to seriously consider competing in 100BS and 200BS, she would have a spot on the Aus team undoubtedly. Incredible that she could achieve that whilst still being so successful in the BK.

phelpsfan
Reply to  tashswam
2 months ago

Less impressive when you consider the state of Aussie backstroking atm

Sub13
Reply to  phelpsfan
2 months ago

I assume you meant to say breast and not back.

She would have made the team for 100 breast for almost every country in the world including Canada. She’s top 30 in the world for both breast events. Extremely impressive, and not just because Australia has weak breast.

phelpsfan
Reply to  Sub13
2 months ago

Meant breast

phelpsfan
Reply to  Sub13
2 months ago

She’s not making the us team

phelpsfan
Reply to  phelpsfan
2 months ago

Last edited 2 months ago by phelpsfan
Sub13
Reply to  phelpsfan
2 months ago

True. It’s her 6th best event and one of USA’s strongest. Very few swimmers in the world would make the US team in their 6th best event.

Doesn’t mean it’s not impressive.

Swemmer
2 months ago

I think that O’Callaghan is a lock for the 2nd spot in the 100 back behind McKeown with Seebohm off form

Troyy
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

I doubt she’ll take the spot because it clashes with both 100 and 200 free so it’ll go to Anderson or Barclay.

Swemmer
Reply to  Troyy
2 months ago

100 and 200 free on the same day?

Brutal

flicker
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

100 back semis/200 free final and then 100 back final/100 free semis and theres about half an hour between events in both doubles

SNygans01
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

Think there is only a 30-ish minute gap between the 100Back semi and the 200Free final (in that order) – not great.

Robbos
Reply to  SNygans01
2 months ago

Plus MOC doesn’t seem to backup that well.

tashswam
Reply to  Troyy
2 months ago

I really hope Seebohm just has a cracker few months and gets the job done!

commonwombat
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

That would be a fairly safe bet given her PB is 58.4 and the next best realistic candidates (Anderson & Barclay) have yet to break 59. The as yet unanswered question is will she actually swim it in Paris or not; she’s yet to do so at senior international level.

SNygans01
Reply to  commonwombat
2 months ago

In this conversation I guess we are implicitly discounting Atherton, but I’d love to see her return to being a serious contender. Interested to see what she does this evening.

Unsure if anyone else currently hovering around the 60 sec. level (eg. Fredericks) is likely to be at the ‘pointy end’ of competition for the 2nd spot?
There isn’t quite the nice depth of emerging competition that we are seeing the W100 Fly.

Sub13
Reply to  SNygans01
2 months ago

Would love to see Atherton back at her best but it’s been literal years with her not showing anywhere near her best

Sub13
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

Mollie will almost certainly get second at trials with a 57 high or 58 low but then give up the spot.

phelpsfan
Reply to  Sub13
2 months ago

Bit optimistic on the times.

Sub13
Reply to  phelpsfan
2 months ago

She’s literally already been a 58.4. Dropping a tenth to go 58 low is optimistic?

Do you just trawl articles looking for things to argue about? Because you keep doing it and you keep being wrong

snailSpace
2 months ago

Really looking forward to Mollie’s 100 back tomorrow morning (for me). I predict she goes 58.32.

Troyy
Reply to  snailSpace
2 months ago

Would love to see it but her backstroke is usually slower in season than her free.

snailSpace
Reply to  Troyy
2 months ago

Hmm for whatever reason I was under the impression that her current PB was from an in season swim but clearly not. Was it Trials last year?

Last edited 2 months ago by snailSpace
Troyy
Reply to  snailSpace
2 months ago

Nah it was nationals but some of SPW had some rest for that meet.

flicker
Reply to  snailSpace
2 months ago

it’s from nationals last year she was like a 52.6 and 1:55 low, but she equalled it at trials when she was 52.5 ish and 1:53 high

STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
2 months ago

Kyle Chalmers once again skipped an event he was scheduled to enter. What does he have against pushing himself just a little bit? This is just a training meet after all. He has to decide whether he wants to take the 200FS and 100BF seriously.

Troyy
Reply to  STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
2 months ago

He scratched the whole day (DNS 50FL and 200FR).

SNygans01
2 months ago

Wow – I wonder if all the 200 Free guys decided to have a ‘who can swim the slowest and still make the A Final’ wager?

commonwombat
Reply to  SNygans01
2 months ago

Not too sure Guiliani would’ve signed up for that after it bit him on the backside yesterday in the 100.

Troyy
Reply to  commonwombat
2 months ago

Giuliani was slower in the final so must have gone all out in the heats.

STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
Reply to  SNygans01
2 months ago

What’s to say they were taking it easy? Southam and Giuliani were disappointing in the 100. It probably reflects the form they’re in right now.

Swemmer
2 months ago

Cameron McSprinter just went a 21.81 at the “National Preparation Meet,” which is right where he has been prior to Doha and Fukuoka.

commonwombat
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

And its all he’ll need to book himself a plane ticket to Paris. The only other Aussie who can regularly break 22 is “Mr All I Wanna Do Is Swim 50’s”. Other than health issues, the only way he misses the plane is if he decides to self-sabotage by dividing focus and try and make the 4X100.

Robbos
Reply to  commonwombat
2 months ago

Ye of little faith.

STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
Reply to  commonwombat
2 months ago

McEvoy did say that 2023 was all about finding speed and that in 2024 he would build up to the 100. It was noticeable in Doha that he lost the 50 in the last few metres when Bukhov just got past him so improving his endurance will be no bad thing. At his peak Mcevoy had great endurance as a sprinter and although he was inconsistent he did go 1.45 in the 200 a few times. I would be surprised if he doesn’t go at least 48 low at trials. Australia does not have six swimmers at that level so a spot in the 4X100 is the minimum for him.

commonwombat
Reply to  STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
2 months ago

He was an exceedingly erratic performer in the 200, particularly on relays where it was not unknown for him to drop a 1.48 split.

Was his loss in Doha due to lack of staying power or was it lost between his ears ….. or is it the case that 2024 McEvoy isn’t quite at 2023 level ? As yet we don’t know.

What IS a matter of record is the reality that he has not swam a sub 48.5 since 2021 Trials and his most recent outings on the 4X100 were not exactly “the stuff of legends”. Ideally, it would be nice if he could produce a 100 that would seriously put him in the frame for the peak 4×100… Read more »

Robbos
Reply to  STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
2 months ago

I’m glad someone is talking sense here.
A swimmer that just went 21.06 last year in the 50 & swimmer faster than ever, should be able to swim a time to make the 4X100 relay team due to his previous endurance in both 100 & 200.
His coach will know very quickly if this affects his 50 or not. I would rely on them to make this decision.

Personal Best
2 months ago

Highlights of the first night, for me:

  • Women’s 800m with Arnie and Lani’s solid times
  • Women’s 100m free – MOC’s swim
  • Women’s 100m breast – Toohey’s great swim

Keen to see how day two goes.

Swemmer
2 months ago

McKeown in 100 fly……

Knowing her I wouldn’t be surprised to see a 57-58

LBSWIM
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

that would be bad, right?

LBSWIM
Reply to  LBSWIM
2 months ago

Oh, McKeown not McKeon…

flicker
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

I would be surprised at anything faster than a 58 high (if she even swims heats and finals)

SNygans01
Reply to  Swemmer
2 months ago

She was DNS, unfortunately.
As was Connor, Wunsch and Kinder

Promising heat swim from Alex Perkins.
A few age-groupers (15,16) made it to A Final too.

Last edited 2 months ago by SNygans01