2024 NSW State Open Championships: Day 1 Finals Live Recap

2024 NEW SOUTH WALES STATE OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS

Rise and shine for our first finals session of the 2024 New South Wales State Open Championships. Although this is a non-selection meet, the Aussies rarely disappoint in terms of head-turning performances on both the men’s and women’s sides.

Follow along as we watch the action unfold at Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic Centre.

MEN’S 400 FREESTYLE — FINAL

  • World Record – 3:40.07, Paul Biedermann (2009)
  • Australian Record – 3:40.08, Ian Thorpe (2002)
  • Commonwealth Record – 3:40.08, Ian Thorpe (2002)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 3:45.43

GOLD – Benjamin Goedemans, 3:50.94
SILVER – Matthew Galea, 3:51.15
BRONZE – James Koch, 3:51.59

19-year-old Benjamin Goedemans got it done for gold in this men’s 400m free, logging a time of 3:50.94. That held off Matthew Galea of Sydney Olympic Park, who touched just .21 behind in 3;51.15. James Koch was also right in the gold medal mix, finishing just over half a second behind Goedemans in 3:51.59.

22-year-old Galea had a big breakthrough last July, where he traveled to compete at the TYR Pro Championships in the United States. There, he recorded new personal best times in the 400 (3:47.54), 800 (7:50.25), and 1500 (14:57.19) freestyle distances, inserting his name into the conversation to make the Australian Olympic Team. His best chance, at this point, looks to be the 1500 free.

Of note, relay contributor Zac Incerti contested this event, placing 5th in a time of 3:53.36.

200 free specialist Alexander Graham, who trains at Miami under his longtime coach Richard Scarce, finished 7th in 3:53.36.

WOMEN’S 50 BUTTERFLY — FINAL

  • World Record: 24.43, Sarah Sjostrom (2014)
  • Australian Record: 25.31, Holly Barratt (2019)
  • Commonwealth Record: 25.20, Fran Halsall (2014)

GOLD – Alexandra Perkins, 25.97
SILVER – Emma McKeon, 25.99
BRONZE – Maddie Groves, 26.13

USC Spartan Alexandria Perkins reaped gold in the women’s 50m fly, producing a time of 25.97. That was just off her morning effort of 25.93 which landed lane 4 for tonight’s final.

Australia’s most decorated Olympian of all time, Emma McKeon, settled for silver only .02 behind in 25.99 as the only other sub-26-second swim of the field.

2016 Olympic silver medalist in the 200m fly Maddie Groves rounded out the podium in 26.13.

Perkins won this event at the 2023 Australian World Championship Trials in 25.92, so she was once again within striking distance of that swim with tonight’s performance. She recently competed at the Doha World Championships in February, putting up a new best time (25.81) in the semifinals, before ultimately taking 6th overall.

As for McKeon, the Griffith ace earned a 25.86 personal best that she threw down last month at the Victorian Championships. McKeon will also be featured in the 100 free later in the session.

MEN’S 200 BUTTERFLY — FINAL

  • World Record: 1:50.34, Kristof Milak (2022)
  • Australian Record: 1:54.46, Nick D’Arcy (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:52.96, Chad Le Clos (2012)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 1:54.97

GOLD – Bowen Gough, 1:57.46
SILVER – William Petric, 1:58.45
BRONZE – Joshua Moore, 2:03.30

The men’s 200m fly final was a relatively quiet one, with only 2 swimmers breaking the 2:00 barrier.

The top 2 finishers were the same as the heats, with 25-year-old Bowen Gough leading the way in 1:57.46 followed by Nunawading’s William Petric who touched about a second back in 1:58.45.

17-year-old Joshua Moore logged a time of 2:03.30 to bag bronze in the event, producing a new personal best by .18 in the process.

Michael Bohl-trained Gough represented Australia at both of the major meets in 2022, the World Championships and Commonwealth Games, before missing the standard in 2023. The 25-year-old owns a lifetime best of 1:55.88 in this 2fly event, a time he registered in 2021 to become Australia’s 5th-best performer in history.

Gough will not only have to be back at his best to qualify for Paris this year, but he’ll have to reach the 1:54.97 benchmark time set by Swimming Australia at the Trials.

WOMEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE — FINAL

  • World Record: 1:04.13, Lilly King (2017)
  • Australian Record: 1:05.09, Leisel Jones (2006)
  • Commonwealth Record: 1:04.82, Tatjana Schoenmaker (2021)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 1:06.31

GOLD – Jenna Strauch, 1:07.83
SILVER – Sienna Toohey, 1:07.97
BRONZE – Matilda Smith, 1:08.45

Demonstrating again that she’s on the mend after missing last year’s World Championships due to injury, Miami’s Jenna Strauch looked smooth with a winning effort of 1:07.83. That was just off the 1:07.59 she put up in the heats, a mark which was near her season-best. That remains at 1:07.33 produced at the Budapest World Cup stop in October.

Strauch repeated as NSW champion, following up on her 1:07.95 gold medal-worthy performance at the 2023 edition of this meet.

Behind her tonight was Sienna Toohey, the 15-year-old who continues to steal the spotlight with her upward trajectory.

Toohey achieved a big feat tonight, breaking the 1:08 barrier for the first time. Entering this competition, the teen’s lifetime best sat at the 1:08.39 notched just last month, which she brought down to 1:07.97 for silver this evening.

Toohey is beating down the door of Leisel Jones‘ record, now less than half a second off the legend’s benchmark for the age category.

As a testament to her progress, Toohey placed 14th in this event last year, producing a time of 1:12.70.

Splits Comparison, Sienna Toohey‘s Progression From August 2023 – March 2024:

TOOHEY AT THE 2023 SCHOOL SPORTS AUSTRALIA SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS TOOHEY AT THE 2024 NEW SOUTH WALES COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS TOOHEY AT THE SWIMMING ACT 2023-24 QUALIFYING MEET 3 TOOHEY DURING TODAY’S FINALS
First 50 32.69 32.07 31.72 31.74
Second 50 36.29 36.32 36.86 36.23
Total Time 1:08.98 1:08.39 1:08.58 1:07.97

For perspective, Toohey’s 1:07.97 performance as a 15-year-old would rank her as the 9th-quickest American 15-16-year-old in history.

MEN’S 50 BREASTSTROKE — FINAL

  • World Record: 25.95, Adam Peaty (2017)
  • Australian Record: 26.32, Sam Williamson (2024)
  • Commonwealth Record: 25.95, Adam Peaty (2017)

GOLD – Joshua Collett, 27.86
SILVER – Grayson Bell, 28.06
BRONZE – Haig Buckingham, 28.08

Former world record holder Matt Wilson earned the pole position this morning in a swift 27.30, the sole man under 28 seconds. That was a new personal bet for the 25-year-old who wound up dropping the final.

In his steada, it was Bond’s Joshua Collett who got it done for gold, hitting 27.86 to produce the 3rd-best time of his career. Collett’s PB remains at the 27.50 turned in last summer in England.

Sommerville House Aquatics’ Grayson Bell worked his way up from 5th out of the heats to snag the silver this evening. The 26-year-old touched in 28.06 to just get the edge over SOSC’s 19-year-old Haig Buckingham who bagged bronze in 28.08.  

Adam Kable trained-Buckingham has been as swift as 27.53 in this 50m breast sprint.

WOMEN’S 100 FREESTYLE — FINAL

  • World Record: 51.71, Sarah Sjostrom (2017)
  • Australian Record: 51.96, Emma McKeon (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: 51.96, Emma McKeon (2021)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 53.61

GOLD – Mollie O’Callaghan, 52.82
SILVER – Bronte Campbell, 53.50
BRONZE – Emma McKeon, 53.70

The world record holder in the women’s 200m free, Mollie O’Callaghan, busted out an eye-catching performance of 52.82 to take this stacked 100m freestyle event.

The 19-year-old from St. Peters Western hacked well over a second off her morning outing of 53.97, opening in 26.15 and bringing hit home in 26.67 for a masterfully split race.

Multi-Olympic medalist Bronte Campbell was next to the wall in 53.50 while McKeon followed up her 50m fly silver with a bronze in this event, registering 53.70.

MOC, McKeon and C2 represent 3 of the top 5 best-ever Australian performers. McKeon owns the national record at 51.96 from the Olympic Games, while MOC’s PB of 52.08 from last year ranks her 3rd among all Aussies. C2’s career-quickest 52.27 from 2018 ranks her as the 4th-fastest Aussie in history.

Of note, 400m free world record holder Ariarne Titmus grabbed the 5th seed this morning in 55.01 but dropped the final. She’ll be racing the 800m free final later in the session, along with 21-year-old Lani Pallister who clocked 55.17 in tonight’s final to place 6th.

As a reminder, Meg Harris and Cate Campbell, two of the top contenders come Trials, are not competing at these championships. They both opted to compete at last week’s Brisbane Metro Championships instead, where Harris clocked times of 53.17 and 53.31 while C1 swam to times of 53.42 and 53.51.

MOC’s 52.82 checks in as a season-best, making her just the 4th woman worldwide to crack the 53-second barrier thus far this season. She now ranks 4th.

McKeon already threw down a time of 53.00 at last month’s Victoria Open Championships while C2 hit 53.30 at January’s South Aussie States.

2023-2024 LCM Women 100 Free

2Marrit
STEENBERGEN
NED52.2602/16
3Mollie
O'CALLAGHAN
AUS52.2704/17
4Meg
HARRIS
AUS52.6004/17
5Junxuan
YANG
CHN52.6804/23
View Top 31»

MEN’S 100 FREESTYLE — FINAL

  • World Record: 46.80, Pan Zhanle (2024)
  • Australian Record: 47.04, Cameron McEvoy (2016)
  • Commonwealth Record: 47.04, Cameron McEvoy (2016)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 48.06

GOLD – William Yang, 48.48
SILVER – Kyle Chalmers, 48.53
BRONZE – Josha Salchow, 48.79

While two women dipped under the Australian Olympic qualification time in the 100m free at this non-selection meet, the men’s field was off the mark at this point in the season.

In an upset over 2016 Olympic champion and 2020 Olympic silver medalist Kyle Chalmers, 25-year-old William Yang wound up atop the podium.

SOSC’s Yang posted an effort of 48.48 to hit the timepad ahead of Chalmers who notched 48.53 as the silver medalist. Visiting German Josha Salchow rounded out the podium in 48.79.

Additional competitors included Chalmers’ teammate Matt Temple producing 49.25 as the 4th place finisher while 17-year-old Marcus Da Silva hit 49.79 for 5th. Cody Simpson produced 49.82 for 6th and 2023 World Championships medalist Flynn Southam, 18, nabbed 7th in 49.87.

Chalmers was faster in the morning, hitting a heats swim of 48.36 to lead the pack. That was still an arm’s length away from the 48.09 he clocked for gold at the 2023 version of this competition.

Yang’s time this evening was a hair off his best-ever 48.38 turned in at the 2022 Commonwealth Games. He continues to progress nicely since undergoing back surgery back surgery before championship season in 2023

Since then Yang recorded swims of 48.52 and 48.53 a few weeks ago at the Victorian Open Championships and looks like a prime challenger for both the individual Olympic slot as well as a relay post.

WOMEN’S 400 IM — FINAL

  • World Record: 4:25.87, Summer McIntosh (2023)
  • Australian Record: 4:29.45, Stephanie Rice (2008)
  • Commonwealth Record: 4:25.87, Summer McIntosh (2023)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 4:38.53

GOLD – Isabella Krantzcke, 4:56.28
SILVER – Talika Irvine, 5:01.43
BRONZE – Indianna Cameron, 5:02.52

Just one swimmer dipped under the 5:00 barrier in the women’s 400m IM tonight. 19-year-old Isabella Krantzcke logged a time of 4:56.28 to lead the pack and produce a new lifetime best.

17-year-old Talika Irvine checked with 5:01.43 for silver and 16-year-old Indianna Cameron posted 5:02.52 as tonight’s bronze medalist.

Jenna Forrester is the 3rd-fastest Australian ever in this event (4:32.30) and her absence from this meet was somewhat surprising.

WOMEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE — FINAL

GOLD – Kaylee McKeown, 2:04.21
SILVER – Bella Grant, 2:11.73
BRONZE – Minna Atherton, 2:11.91

As expected, 22-year-old world record holder Kaylee McKeown ran away with this race, putting up a blistering time of 2:04.21. That beat the field by over 7 seconds in this one-woman race.

McKeon split 29.24/31.93 (1:01.17)/31.75/31.29 (1:03.04) to dominate the field. That 31.29 final 50m was right at the 31.30 split she entered when establishing her 2:03.14 world record at this same competition last year.

American Regan Smith still owns the world rankings crown on the season, having established a world-leading 2:03.99 last weekend at the Westmont Pro Swim Series.

Regardless, McKeown’s effort this evening inserts itself into slot #10 on the list of top 10 performances in history. McKeown owns half of the times on the exclusive list.

Top 10 Women’s LCM 200 Backstroke Performances in History

  1. 2:03.14 – Kaylee McKeown (AUS), 2023
  2. 2:03.35 – Regan Smith (USA), 2019
  3. 2:03.69 – Regan Smith, 2019
  4. 2:03.70 – Kaylee McKeown, 2023
  5. 2:03.80 – Regan Smith, 2023
  6. 2:03.85 – Kaylee McKeown, 2023
  7. 2:03.99 – Regan Smith, 2024
  8. 2:04.06 – Missy Franklin (USA), 2012
  9. 2:04.18 – Kaylee McKeown, 2023
  10. 2:04.21 – Kaylee McKeown, 2024

2023-2024 LCM Women 200 Back

KayleeAUS
McKEOWN
06/13
2:03.30
2Regan
SMITH
USA2:03.9903/09
3Claire
CURZAN
USA2:05.7702/17
4 Kylie
MASSE
CAN2:06.2405/16
5Summer
McINTOSH
CAN2:06.8112/02
View Top 31»

MEN’S 50 BACKSTROKE — FINAL

  • World Record: 23.55, Kliment Kolesnikov (2023)
  • Australian Record: 24.12, Isaac Cooper (2023)
  • Commonwealth Record: 24.04, Liam Tancock (2009)

GOLD – Ben Armbruster, 25.41
SILVER – Lewis Blackburn, 25.49
BRONZE – Toby Peknice, 25.94

The top 3 finishers in this men’s 50m back all delved under 26-second territory, led by Bond’s 21-year-old Ben Armbruster.

Armbruster added .01 from his 25.40 morning swim to top the podium in 25.41. That improved up on the 25.68 put up last year for bronze in this event.

24-year-old Lewis Blackburn of St. Andrew’s registered 25.49 to come within striking distance of his 25.38 PB from last year’s World Championships Trials.

Toby Penknice upgraded his 4th seed to the bronze medal position in 25.94.

WOMEN’S 800 FREE – FINAL

  • World Record: 8:04.79, Katie Ledecky (2016)
  • Australian Record: 8:13.59, Ariarne Titmus (2022 & 2023)
  • Commonwealth Record: 8:11.39, Summer McIntosh (2024)
  • Australian Olympic QT – 8:22.20

GOLD – Ariarne Titmus, 8:17.87
SILVER – Lani Pallister, 8:19.23
BRONZE – Amelia Weber, 8:45.16

Olympic multi-medalist Ariarne Titmus was the top performer in the women’s 800m free, clocking a time of 8:17.87. She and runner-up Pallister (8:19.23) already dipped under the Swimming Australia-mandated qualification time of 8:22.20 needed for the Olympics, although this is a non-selection meet.

The pair repeated their 1-2 finish from the 2023 edition of this competition, where Titmus posted 8:19.33 and Pallister 8:25.07.

This duo also represents the top 2 performers in Australian swimming history. Titmus owns the national record in 8:13.59 from the 2022 Commonwealth Games while Pallister’s season-best of 8:15.11 notched at the Budapest stop of the 2023 World Aquatics Swimming World Cup renders her #2.

Season rankings-wise, 23-year-old Titmus inserts herself into the 6th slot, overtaking the 8:25.40 put up at December’s Queensland Championships.

2023-2024 LCM Women 800 Free

SummerCAN
MCINTOSH
02/08
8:11.39
2Katie
LEDECKY
USA8:12.9504/13
3Ariarne
TITMUS
AUS8:14.0606/13
4Lani
PALLISTER
AUS8:15.1110/22
5Simona
QUADARELLA
ITA8:17.4402/17
6 Isabel
GOSE
GER8:17.5302/17
7Bingjie
LI
CHN8:20.0109/29
8Erika
FAIRWEATHER
NZL8:21.2310/08
9Katie
GRIMES
USA8:21.5704/14
10Eve
THOMAS
NZL8:22.2704/13
View Top 31»

In This Story

83
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of

83 Comments
newest
oldest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Irrelevant Swim Production
2 months ago

Lol regan smith faster than kaylee. Regan is winning 4 olympic golds in paris and kaylee wont even make the podium

BennyBD
Reply to  Irrelevant Swim Production
2 months ago

Irrelevant troll.

Sub13
Reply to  BennyBD
2 months ago

Lol don’t buy into it so easily. Good trolling should make you believe it’s real. This one was obviously trying to show they were a troll by saying Kaylee won’t make the podium

BennyBD
Reply to  Sub13
2 months ago

You are so right but they are a pathetic bunch of fools who have nothing better to do than rubbish elite athletes. I shouldn’t bite but it makes me cranky.

Swemmer
2 months ago

I never cease to be amazed by Mollie O’Callaghan’s back half, it is perhaps more impressive than peak Popovici

I can’t think of one other top-tier 100 freestyler who can nearly even split their races like O’Callaghan can

Swemmer
2 months ago

53.5 is a very good sign for C2

Hiswimcoach
2 months ago

Unrelated but daniel Roy went 209.8 in federal way last night in 200 breast

Aragon Son of Arathorne
2 months ago

guess it is Kaylee that needs to look out.

Pan Fan
Reply to  Aragon Son of Arathorne
2 months ago

Why?

Regan Smith swam 2:03.80 last year before Fukuoka.

Guess what happened in Fukuoka?

AsianAussieAmerican
Reply to  Aragon Son of Arathorne
2 months ago

Look out for her own world record so she can beat it again?

LBSWIM
Reply to  Aragon Son of Arathorne
2 months ago

I’m a big Regan fan, but nothing has happened to deflate Kaylee’s dominance. She’s been more clutch. Could Regan win? Absolutely. If I had to bet, it would be on Kaylee. Both are great champions.

WahooSwimFan
Reply to  LBSWIM
2 months ago

It will take a 2:02 or better to win the Olympics I bet.

Fast and Furious
2 months ago

Your 200 back 10 performances list doesn’t list Regan’s 2:03.99 from last week which should check in as #7. Kaylee’s swim today should be #10.

Emily Se-Bom Lee
2 months ago

titmus 8:17.87, 1.5 seconds faster than she was 12 months ago.
pallister 8:19.23

Swim fan
Reply to  Emily Se-Bom Lee
2 months ago

Making Summer’s time of 8.11.39 look amazing. I hope she swims it in Paris.

Robbos
Reply to  Swim fan
2 months ago

Summer’s 8.11 is amazing, only 1 women has been faster.

SWIM SAM
Reply to  Swim fan
2 months ago

It would be cooler to see her do the 200 IM unless she can do both 👀 which would be the greatest Olympic event turn around we have ever seen!

Troyy
2 months ago

8:17 and 8:19 for Arnie and Lani

Personal Best
Reply to  Troyy
2 months ago

Those are really strong times for both, considering they’re not that far off their PBs.
Seems Arnie brought it home fast over the last 200 to overtake Pallister. Would have been great to watch.

About Retta Race

Retta Race

Former Masters swimmer and coach Loretta (Retta) thrives on a non-stop but productive schedule. Nowadays, that includes having just earned her MBA while working full-time in IT while owning French 75 Boutique while also providing swimming insight for BBC.

Read More »