2022 Ivy League Men’s Championships: Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2022 Men’s Ivy League Swimming & Diving Championships

The last session of the 2022 Ivy League Men’s Championships should be exciting, with several records in jeopardy of falling. Matthew Fallon of Penn already broke the meet and pool records in prelims of the 200 breast and will be in a position to lower those marks again in finals. Harvard’s Dean Farris will swim his last two 100 freestyles in the individual final and in the 400 free relay, giving himself two opportunities to lower his meet mark and break the pool record. Princeton’s Raunak Khosla will be chasing his own meet record and will hope to put his name up on the board for the pool record, as well, when he swims in the final of the 200 fly.

Men’s 1650 Freestyle – Fastest Heat

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 14:40.18 – Chris Swanson, Penn (2016)
  • Pool Record: 14:45.12 – Chris Swanson, Penn (2015)
  • NCAA A Standard: 14:37.31
  • NCAA B Standard: 15:26.19

Podium:

  1. Shane Washart, Harvard – 14:47.51
  2. Noah Millard, Yale – 14:53.31
  3. Arik Katz, Harvard – 14:54.67
  4. Dylan Porges, Princeton – 15:05.71
  5. Cole Kuster, Harvard – 15:07.04
  6. John Ehling, Princeton – 15:08.73
  7. Aidan Wilson, Brown – 15:09.39
  8. William Kamps, Penn – 15:13.63

It looked like synchronized swimming for the first third of the race, with Harvard’s Shane Washart, Princeton’s Dylan Porges, and Yale’s Noah Millard mirroring each other’s strokes. Washart, who won the 1000 free on Friday, separated himself from Porges and Millard after the 500 mark. Porges and Millard continued to trade stroke-for-stroke, with Harvard’s Arik Katz just behind.

Millard moved into second place at around the 800 mark, putting about half a body length on Porges. At the 1000, both Washart and Millard clicked into another gear, both descending to sub-27s. Katz pulled even with Porges at the 1200. Washart continued to build his lead over Millard, while the field behind him spread out: Millard alone in second place, Katz unchallenged at third, and Porges in open water at fourth.

At the finish, it was Washart (14:47.51), Millard (14:53.31), Katz (14:54.67), and Porges (15:05.71).

Princeton’s John Ehling put up the time to beat in the early heats, dropping 18.2 seconds from his seed time and topping the early afternoon field with 15:08.73. Brown’s Aidan Wilson, entered with no time, placed second in 15:09.39. Penn’s William Kamps, the top seed of the slower heats, improved by 13 seconds to finish third with 15:13.63.

Men’s 200 Backstroke – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 1:38.99 – Dean Farris, Harvard (2018)
  • Pool Record: 1:38.99 – Dean Farris, Harvard (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 1:39.13
  • NCAA B Standard: 1:45.04

Podium:

  1. Will Grant, Harvard – 1:41.43
  2. Daniel Gallagher, Penn – 1:43.10
  3. Anthony Rincon, Harvard – 1:43.21
  4. Reid Arwood, Brown – 1:43.35
  5. Brett Feyerick, Princeton – 1:44.09
  6. Keanan Dols, Penn – 1:44.53
  7. Kyle Won, Columbia – 1:45.25
  8. Joseph Licht, Columbia – 1:46.70

Defending champion Will “Gunner” Grant separated himself from the field over the second half of the race to win the 200 back in 1:41.43, .06 faster than his winning time in 2020. Behind him, four swimmers were competing for the second spot. When the waves cleared at the touch, it was Penn’s Daniel Gallagher (1:43.10) out-touching Anthony Rincon of Harvard (1:43.21) and Reid Arwood of Brown (1:43.35). Princeton’s Brett Feyerick was another half body back, beating Penn’s Keanan Dols by half a second.

Kyle Won and Joseph Licht of Columbia, swimming in opposite outside lanes, rounded out the A final.

Men’s 100 Freestyle – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 41.42 – Dean Farris, Harvard (2019)
  • Pool Record: 41.91 – Alex Righi, Yale (2009)
  • NCAA A Standard: 41.71
  • NCAA B Standard: 43.80

Podium:

  1. Dean Farris, Harvard – 41.97
  2. Mahlon Reihman, Harvard – 42.49
  3. Max Walther, Princeton – 42.89
  4. Philippe Marcoux, Yale – 43.11
  5. Marcus Holmquist, Harvard – 43.43
  6. Joseph Page, Yale – 43.55
  7. Benjamin Feldman, Penn – 44.03
  8. Raphael Marcoux, Harvard – 44.39

Harvard’s Dean Farris, in his very last individual event for the Crimson in the Ivies, avenged his 50 free loss to teammate Mahlon Reihman with a 41.97-to-42.49 victory in the 100. Farris was out in 20.08 and home in 21.89, pulling away on the third 25 to win by half a body length.

Princeton’s Max Walther was another four-tenths behind Reihman, the only other sub-43 in the field with his third-place 42.89. Philippe Marcoux of Yale, swimming next to his brother Raphael Marcoux of Harvard, came in fourth with 43.11.

Harvard’s Marcus Holmquist edged Yale’s Joseph Page for fifth place, 43.43 to 43.55. Benjamin Feldman of Penn went 44.03 for seventh, while Raphael Marcoux took eighth in 44.39.

Men’s 200 Breaststroke – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 1:51.69 – Matthew Fallon, Penn (2022)
  • Pool Record: 1:51.69 – Matthew Fallon, Penn (2022)
  • NCAA A Standard: 1:52.28
  • NCAA B Standard: 1:58.43

Podium:

  1. Matthew Fallon, Penn – 1:51.44
  2. Demirkan Demir, Columbia – 1:52.76
  3. Jack Kelly, Brown – 1:53.70
  4. Jared Simpson, Harvard – 1:55.13
  5. Neil Simpson, Penn – 1:55.36
  6. Jason Schreiber, Penn – 1:55.63
  7. Brian Lou, Princeton – 1:56.57
  8. Jacob Bass, Cornell – 1:58.20

After breaking the Ivy meet and pool records this morning, top-seeded Matthew Fallon of Penn, lowered those marks by another .25 to win with a A cut of 1:51.44. Demirkan Demir of Columbia, who upset Fallon to win the 100 breast title, looked like he might challenge Fallon again over the first 100 yards. But Fallon out-split Demir by 1.5 seconds on the third 50 and was out in clear water for the rest of the race. Demir finished with 1:52.76, a full body length ahead of Brown’s Jack Kelly (1:53.70).

Harvard’s Jared Simpson, the runner-up in 2020, placed fourth with 1:55.13, beating Penn’s Neil Simpson (1:55.36) and Jason Schreiber (1:55.63).

Princeton’s Brian Lou (1:56.57) beat Jacob Bass of Cornell (1:58.20) for seventh.

Men’s 200 Butterfly – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 1:42.05 – Raunak Khosla (2019)
  • Pool Record: 1:42.46 – J. Johnson (2020)
  • NCAA A Standard: 1:40.44
  • NCAA B Standard: 1:46.69

Podium:

  1. Raunak Khosla, Princeton – 1:41.50
  2. Max Kreidl, Princeton – 1:43.52
  3. Seungjoon Ahn, Columbia – 1:43.75
  4. Aayush Deshpande, Harvard – 1:44.85
  5. Nicholas Lim, Princeton – 1:45.30
  6. Jacob Johnson, Harvard – 1:45.74
  7. Joseph Gurski, Cornell – 1:46.66
  8. Andrew Dai, Penn – 1:47.53

Raunak Khosla of Princeton looked like he might get a challenge from Harvard’s Jacob Johnson over the first 100 yards, but the Ivy record-holder crushed his third 50 to pull away from Johnson and the rest of the field. Khosla finished two body lengths in front, stopping the clock at 1:41.50 for a new Ivy meet and DeNunzio pool record time.

This was Khosla’s third individual title and third pool record. He also set a championship record in the 200 IM but just missed the meet mark in the 400 IM.

Teammate Max Kreidl, with the next-best back half, passed Johnson and his teammate Aayush Deshpande at the 150 and finished second with 1:43.52. Columbia’s Seungjoon Ahn was just behind him; he, too, slipped past the Harvard teammates over the last 50 yards and placed third with 1:43.75.

Deshpande touched fourth with 1:44.85. Princeton’s Nicholas Lim, seventh at the halfway mark, moved up to fifth at the finish, beating Johnson 1:45.30 to 1:45.74.

Cornell’s Joseph Gurski and Penn’s Andrew Dai rounded out the final.

Men’s 3-Meter Diving – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 457.35 – Michael Mosca, Harvard (2015)
  • Pool Record: 457.35 – Michael Mosca, Harvard (2015)
  • NCAA A Standard:

Podium:

  1. Jonathan Suckow, Columbia – 464.55
  2. Colten Young, Princeton – 379.50
  3. Joe Victor, Princeton – 336.60
  4. Griffin Brooks, Princeton – 335.55
  5. JP Ditto, Yale – 333.35
  6. Trevor Labudo, Brown – 322.40
  7. Taso Callanan, Princeton – 319.10
  8. Luke Foster, Harvard – 272.20

Columbia’s Jonathan Suckow broke the Ivy League meet and DeNunzio pool records with a monster 91.80 dive on his final dive to finish the event with 464.55 points. That makes two-for-two meet marks for Suckow, who won the 1-meter event in record fashion, as well.

Princeton swept spots 2-3-4 with strong performances from Colten Young (379.50 points), Joseph Victor (336.60), and Griffin Brooks (355.55). Victor changed his sixth dive at the last minute, going for a 3.5 degree of difficulty, a risky move that paid off.

Suckow average 77.43 points per dive, while Young averaged 63.75. Harvard’s Luke Foster averaged 45.37, while the five other divers were in the 55s.

Men’s 400 Freestyle Relay – Timed Final

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 2:51.43 – Harvard (2018)
  • Pool Record: 2:51.43 – Harvard (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 2:50.99
  • NCAA B Standard: 2:52.46

Podium:

  1. Harvard – 2:50.40
  2. Princeton – 2:52.08
  3. Yale – 2:52.77
  4. Columbia – 2:55.90
  5. Brown – 2:58.12
  6. Dartmouth – 2:58.31
  7. Cornell – 2:58.41
  8. Penn – 2:58.50

Harvard went out of the meet the way they began, with a NCAA A cut and Ivy meet relay record. Mahlon Reihman (42.55), Marcus Holmquist (43.22), Ryan Linnihan (43.48), and Dean Farris (41.15) combined for 2:50.40, a full second under their previous record that had stood since 2018.

Princeton and Yale gave chase on either side of Harvard, with the Tigers nearly catching the leaders on the second leg. Princeton’s quartet of Brian Lou (43.80), Max Walther (42.08), Nicholas Lim (43.69), and Raunak Khosla (42.51) finished second in 2:52.08.

Yale’s third-place team of Noah Millard (43.59), Joseph Page (42.74), Marcus Hodgson (44.09), and Philippe Marcoux (42.35) placed third with 2:52.77, more than three seconds ahead of Columbia (2:55.90).

The last four teams all finished within .38 of each other, with Brown leading the charge (2:58.12) followed by Dartmouth (2:58.31), Cornell (2:58.41), and Penn (2:58.50).

Final Team Scores

  1. Harvard University – 1596
  2. Princeton University – 1492
  3. University of Pennsylvania – 1066
  4. Brown University – 976
  5. Columbia University – 919
  6. Yale University – 788
  7. Cornell University – 572
  8. Dartmouth College – 299

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Just curious
9 months ago

Anyone know if Dean is making a run for the 2024 team? I thought I read or heard something about him working after graduation. Anyway, just curious.

?????
9 months ago

NCAA standards for the 100 free?

Lil Swimmy
9 months ago

dean farris flopiana

coachymccoachface
9 months ago

God this meet is awesome.

lol
9 months ago

rip yale

Oldswimdad
9 months ago

Yale’s lowest score in 20 years I believe.

Crimson
9 months ago

I’m sure that fourth place isn’t their final goal, but gotta give it up to the Brown swimmers and coaching staff on another great championship. Awesome final day in a close battle with Columbia. The team came to race! Kevin Norman is a great leader – it’s great to see the program finding success.

Jay Ryan
Reply to  Crimson
9 months ago

Yes I was proud of them

Jabroni Pepperoni
9 months ago

Is our lord Dean not swimming NCAAs?

Coachmommy
Reply to  Jabroni Pepperoni
9 months ago

It was his last individual swim for Harvard at the Ivies.

Marklewis
Reply to  Jabroni Pepperoni
9 months ago

Yes, Dean will have one last college meet at NCAAs to showcase his awesome aquatic talents for all his fans and admirers.

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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