2022 Ivy League Men’s Championships: Day 3 Finals Live Recap

2022 Men’s Ivy League Swimming & Diving Championships

 

Men’s 1000 Freestyle – Fastest Heat

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 8:46.99 – B. Novak, Harvard (2018)
  • Pool Record: 8:46.99 – B. Novak, Harvard (2018)

Podium:

  1. Shane Washart, Harvard – 8:52.09
  2. Dylan Porges, Princeton – 8:55.68
  3. Arik Katz, Harvard – 8:56.05
  4. Cole Kuster, Harvard – 9:00.33
  5. William Kamps, Penn – 9:01.17
  6. Nicolas Ortega, Brown – 9:01.96
  7. John Ehling, Princeton – 9:02.31
  8. Noah Brune, Harvard – 9:02.90

Harvard’s Shane Washart led from start to finish. He swam a smooth race, even-splitting his 500s with 4:25.52/4:26.57. Princeton’s Dylan Porges, swimming in lane 1, held onto second place throughout the entire final. He finished 3.6 seconds back with 8:55.68, holding off Arik Katz of Harvard, who had been moving up on the leaders during the final 200 yards. Katz and teammate Cole Kuster, in lanes 3 and 4, finished nearly together, a body length in front of William Kamps of Penn.

John Ehling of Princeton dropped 24 seconds to lead the afternoon 1000s with 9:02.31. Columbia’s Stanford Li was second with 9:03.20, followed by Brown’s Andrew Berzolla (9:06.54).

Men’s 400 Individual Medley – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 3:41.00 – M. Andrew, Penn (2019)
  • Pool Record: 3:41.95 – M. Andrew, Penn (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 3:39.16
  • NCAA B Standard: 3:51.46

Podium:

  1. Raunak Khosla, Princeton – 3:41.43
  2. Jacob Johnson, Harvard – 3:45.43
  3. Ben Hayes, Brown – 3:46.84
  4. Peyton Werner, Princeton – 3:47.60
  5. Billy Fallon, Penn – 3:49.21
  6. Kevin Keil, Penn – 3:50.55
  7. Lukas Scheidl, Brown – 3:50.68
  8. Jason Schreiber, Penn – 3:50.71

Jacob Johnson of Harvard was out first from lane 7, leading the field with a 50.55 butterfly. He held his lead through the backstroke but Princeton’s Raunak Khosla pulled even after the first 25 of breaststroke. With a 1:00 breast, Khosla put a 2.5-second cushion between himself and Johnson heading into the freestyle leg. Khosla came home in 51.8 to lower his Princeton record and to break the DeNunzio Pool record with 3:41.43. Johnson held onto to second place, stopping the clock at 3:45.43.

Brown’s Ben Hayes, who had put up the fastest time in the morning, held up a very fast-charging Peyton Werner of Princeton to earn the third-place medal. Werner was down by 3.4 seconds headed into the freestyle, but he came home in a 50.9 to challenge Hayes.

Penn took sixth, seventh, and eighth place with Billy Fallon, Kevin Keil, and Jason Schreiber, while Brown scored at seventh with Lukas Scheidl.

Men’s 100 Butterfly – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 45.12 – D. Lennox, Princeton (2009)
  • Pool Record: 45.12 – D. Lennox, Princeton (2009)
  • NCAA A Standard: 44.96
  • NCAA B Standard: 47.43

Podium:

  1. Umit Gures, Harvard – 44.89
  2. Jonas Kistorp, Columbia – 45.88
  3. Aayush Deshpande, Harvard – 46.70
  4. Tyler Hong, Princeton – 46.74
  5. Mahlon Reihman, Harvard – 46.87
  6. Max Kreidl, Princeton – 47.09
  7. Raphael Marcoux, Harvard – 47.12
  8. Horace Qiao, Brown – 47.59

Defending champion Umit Gures of Harvard won the 100 fly with a new Ivy meet and DeNunzio Pool record, taking down Doug Lennox’s mark that had held since 2009. Gures was second at the 50 wall but he had strong underwaters that put him was out front with 25 yards to go. He split his race 21.33-23.56, putting up the fastest second half by over 1 second.

Second place went to Columbia’s Jonas Kistorp, who had posted the fastest time of the morning. Kistorp was out in 21.0 but his 24.82 second 50 was no match for Gures.

Harvard scored at third, fifth, and seventh as well with Aayush Deshpande, Mahlon Reihman and Raphael Marcoux. Tyler Hong of and Max Kreidl of Princeton finished fourth and sixth. Brown’s Horace Qiao was eighth.

Men’s 200 Freestyle – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 1:30.83 – D. Farris, Harvard (2019)
  • Pool Record: 1:31.17 – D. Farris, Harvard (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 1:32.05
  • NCAA B Standard: 1:36.32

Podium:

  1. Dean Farris, Harvard – 1:32.67
  2. Noah Millard, Yale – 1:34.13
  3. Nicholas Lim, Princeton – 1:34.80
  4. Max Walther, Princeton – 1:35.12
  5. Ben Littlejohn, Harvard – 1:35.14
  6. Isaac Weigel, Dartmouth – 1:35.85
  7. Joseph Page, Yale – 1:36.54
  8. Billy Swartwout, Princeton – 1:36.58

American record-holder Dean Farris of Harvard left nothing to chance in the final of the 200 free. He went out aggressively right away, already half a body length up on the field at the 50 wall. Joseph Page of Yale was in second place through the 100, with Max Walther and Nicholas Lim of Princeton just behind him.

While Farris continued to build his lead, Yale’s Noah Millard moved up on the second wave of swimmers and slipped past Lim, Walther, and teammate Page. Millard came home in 23.77, by far the fastest final 50 in the final, to earn second place behind Farris, 1:32.67 to 1:34.13. Harvard’s Ben Littlejohn had the next-fastest final 50 with 24.20 but he fell just short of catching Princeton’s Walther (1:35.12), who placed fourth behind teammate Lim (1:34.80).

Isaac Weigel of Dartmouth took another .4 off his time to finish sixth. Page held off Princeton’s Billy Swartwout, 1:36.54 to 1:36.58, for seventh.

Men’s 100 Breaststroke – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 51.85 – I. Evdokimov, Cornell (2018)
  • Pool Record: 51.85 – I. Evdokimov, Cornell (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 51.59
  • NCAA B Standard: 54.27

Podium:

  1. Demirkan Demir, Columbia – 51.93
  2. Matthew Fallon, Penn – 52.30
  3. Jared Simpson, Harvard – 52.55
  4. Jack Kelly, Brown – 52.82
  5. Michael Chang, Columbia – 52.86
  6. Josh Brown, Princeton – 52.99
  7. Brian Lou, Princeton – 53.48
  8. Neil Simpson, Penn – 54.53

Columbia’s Demirkan Demir upset Penn’s Matthew Fallon to win the 100 breast title with the only sub-52 time of the day. Demir split 24.63-27.30 en route to his victory. He was even with teammate Michael Change at the halfway point, about half a second in front of Fallon. Fallon came home .20 faster but couldn’t make up the deficit and finished second in 52.30. Fallon already has an NCAA A cut from earlier in the season.

Jared Simpson of Harvard placed third, just holding off Jack Kelly from Brown, 52.55 to 52.82. Chang was next, coming to the wall .04 behind Kelly. Princeton earned spots 6 and 7 with Josh Brown (52.99) and Brian Lou (53.48). Penn’s Neil Simpson rounded out the final with 54.53.

Men’s 100 Backstroke – Finals

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 44.81 – D. Farris, Harvard (2018)
  • Pool Record: 44.81 – D. Farris, Harvard (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 44.94
  • NCAA B Standard: 47.77

Podium:

  1. Gunner Grant, Harvard – 46.58
  2. Tyler Hong, Princeton – 47.18
  3. Anthony Rincon, Harvard – 47.48
  4. Brett Feyerick, Princeton – 47.58
  5. Mark McCrary, Penn – 47.69
  6. Keanan Dols, Penn – 47.99
  7. Reid Arwood, Brown – 48.11
  8. Jack Hamilton, Penn – 48.60

It was an exciting race in the middle of the pool as Harvard’s Gunner Grant and Princeton’s Tyler Hong traded stroke for stroke throughout the first 75 yards. Grant had a powerful third turn that put him out of reach over the last 25 yards and got the win in 46.58. Hong went 47.18 for second place in his second final of the night (he also placed fourth in the 100 fly). Harvard’s Anthony Rincon edged Princeton’s Brett Feyerick by .10 for third place.

Penn took fifth, sixth, and eighth with Mark McCrary (47.69), Keanan Dols (47.99), and Jack Hamilton (48.60). Reid Arwood of Brown came in seventh (48.11).

Men’s 3-Meter Diving – Consolation Final

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 457.35 – M. Mosca (2015)
  • Pool Record:
  • NCAA A Standard:

Places 9-16:

  1. George Callanan, Princeton – 357.80
  2. Jameson Crandell, Cornell – 334.10
  3. Adam Wesson, Harvard – 314.30
  4. Cody Hopkins, Penn – 307.95
  5. Jack Williams, Penn – 292.45
  6. Aidan Thomas, Yale – 282.90
  7. Trevor Nelson, Penn – 273.40
  8. Nick Nocita, Harvard – 255.45

Princeton’s George Callanan moved from 15th in prelims to winning the B final to assure a ninth-place finish in the 3-meter diving event. Callanan, whose twin brother Taso is diving in the A final tomorrow night, started with a first dive that earned 64.50 points, rising immediately to the top of the standings. He averaged 59.63 points per dive, more than four points, on average, higher than second-place Jameson Crandell of Cornell. Crandell, who had led this group in morning dives, finished second with 334.10 points. Harvard’s Adam Wesson placed third (314.30).

Men’s 400 Medley Relay – Timed Final

  • Ivy League Meet Record: 3:06.98 – Harvard (2017)
  • Pool Record: 3:07.83 – Harvard (2018)
  • NCAA A Standard: 3:05.47
  • NCAA B Standard: 3:07.53

Podium:

  1. Harvard – 3:05.72
  2. Princeton – 3:07.08
  3. Columbia – 3:10.18
  4. Penn – 3:12.15
  5. Yale – 3:12.42
  6. Brown – 3:13.55
  7. Cornell – 3:14.97
  8. Dartmouth – 3:17.28

Harvard broke the Ivy League meet and DeNunzio Pool records with 3:05.72, swimming mostly in clear water with only Princeton giving chase. With the A cut they swam on Wednesday night in the 200 medley relay, and the B cuts they have achieved in both 800 free, 200 free, and 400 medley relays, the Crimson are poised to swim a full complement of relays at NCAAs.

Harvard got off to a stellar start with a 45.39 backstroke leg from Farris. Simpson followed with 51.46 on the breaststroke, handing over to Gures who clocked a 46.12 butterfly. Holmquist brought it home for the Crimson in 42.75.

Running in second place from start to finish was Princeton with Hong (47.13), Khosla (51.23), Lim (45.26), and Walther (42.46). The Tigers were also under the pool record mark and a mere .10 off the Ivy meet record with 3:07.08.

Columbia was all alone in third place, running a couple of seconds behind the leaders. Kyle Won led off in 48.44. Demir added a 51.88 breast leg. He was followed by Kistorp (45.94) and Shepanzyk (43.92) for a combined 3:10.18.

Team Scores After Day 3

  1. Harvard University – 1060
  2. Princeton University – 1024
  3. University of Pennsylvania – 675
  4. Brown University – 672
  5. Columbia University – 598
  6. Yale University – 512
  7. Cornell University – 385
  8. Dartmouth College – 206

 

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tigger
7 months ago

not sure that’s the right josh brown lol

The Weez
7 months ago

I love this. Thanks

DCSwim
7 months ago

More conferences need the 1000 tbh

Meme swimmer
7 months ago

That Simpson kid whose goggles fell off in the 100 breast is a legend for wearing goggles on the podium

Oldswimdad
7 months ago

Yale???

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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