2019 Men’s NCAAs: Texas Scores Two Divers, IU One on 1-Meter

2019 MEN’S NCAA SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Texas put two divers into the top 8 on the 1-meter board, though last year’s 10th-place finisher missed scoring. And Indiana will score one in the A final, though their 11th-place finisher from last year also missed scoring.

1-Meter Diving – Prelims

Top 16 Qualifiers:

  1. Colin Zeng, Tennessee – 392.35
  2. James Connor, Indiana – 382.25
  3. Briadam Herrera, Miami – 356.35
  4. Sam Thornton, Texas A&M – 349.75
  5. Grayson Campbell, Texas – 340.85
  6. Jordan Windle, Texas – 332.60
  7. Hector Garcia, Penn State -331.20
  8. Nathaniel Hernandez, Duke -320.90
  9. Juan Hernandez, LSU – 318.50
  10. Bradley Buchter, Navy -318.05
  11. Evan Moretti, Duke – 317.55
  12. Matthew Wade, Tennessee – 316.70
  13. Joshua Davidson, Florida State – 315.70
  14. Sebastian Masterton, Kentucky – 314.25
  15. Greg Duncan, Purdue – 310.15
  16. Kyle Goodwin, Missouri -309.35

Tennessee’s Colin Zeng qualified first, passing up Indiana’s James Connor over the course of the six-dive prelims. Scores will reset for tonight’s final, with the top 8 locked into the top 8 positions regardless of score. Divers 9 through 16 will compete for 9th through 16th place later on this afternoon.

In the team scoring battle, Texas will get big points out of Grayson Campbell (5th today) Jordan Windle (6th). Windle was 5th last year on 1-meter and Campbell 8th. But Jacob Cornish (10th last year) won’t score after tumbling to 26th.

Indiana, meanwhile, has Connor returning from his 3rd place finish last year. But Andrew Capobianco (11th as a freshman) won’t score after falling to 24th.

Meanwhile, Cal almost pulled a diving scorer, a rare feat for that program. Connor Callahan was running in the top 8 early, but faded over his last couple dives and wound up 18th.

If the Texas and Indiana divers hold their spots tonight, they’d score 27 points (Texas) and 17 points (Indiana) tonight.

Other teams scoring multiple divers: Duke (qualifying 8th and 11th) and Tennessee (1st and 12th).

Connor, Zeng, Windle, Campbell, and Texas A&M’s Sam Thornton will reprise their A final appearances from last year. LSU’s Juan Hernandez, 7th last year, just missed out on a return trip, winding up 9th in prelims.

1-Meter Diving – Consolation Finals

Finishers:

  • 9th: Juan Hernandez, LSU – 362.20
  • 10th: Greg Duncan, Purdue – 343.85
  • 11th: Evan Moretti, Duke – 340.25
  • 12th: Sebastian Masterton, Kentucky – 335.35
  • 13th: Bradley Buchter, Virginia Tech – 314.90
  • 14th: Joshua Davidson, Florida State – 307.15
  • 15th: Matthew Wade, Tennessee – 304.85
  • 16th: Kyle Goodwin, Missouri – 276.95

LSU’s Juan Hernandez was the class of the B final. Last year’s 7th-place finisher dominated consols, scoring 362.20 to win by almost 20 points over the field.

Purdue’s Greg Duncan, a transfer from UNC, was 10th in 343.85, just edging Duke’s Evan Moretti by about three.

Kentucky’s Sebastian Masterton wasn’t far behind those two, scoring 335.35. From there, it was a pretty steep dropoff towards the final four divers.

Team Scores

Team B final points Projected A final points
Projected Diving Score
Texas 27 27
Tennessee 2 20 22
Duke 6 11 17
Indiana 17 17
Miami 16 16
Texas A&M 15 15
Penn State 12 12
LSU 9 9
Purdue 7 7
Kentucky 5 5
Navy 4 4
Florida State 3 3
Missouri 1 1

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leo
1 year ago

time to decouple these two different sports

Longhorn
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

If and when that happens, we will act accordingly, until then, Texas will invest and support the divers as they have earned their spots on the team. Let’s not forget, Texas SWIMMING qualified 20 swimmers! But We respect our divers. Hook ‘em horns!

Swammer
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

I guess Track & Field should should only include track, or we should just take kickers out of football? It’s part of the game, Texas understands where to invest and capitalizes on it every year. It’s no secret. It’s called Swimming & Diving.

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Swammer
1 year ago

It’s really not, tho. There’s no decathlon-style event that combines a 100 fly and the 1m springboard.

Longhorn
Reply to  Steve Nolan
1 year ago

Tell that to the Texas swimmers who qualified but are not swimming due to this sport IS in fact Swimming AND Diving. And we will win this championship again. #5peat

Buckeyeboy
Reply to  Longhorn
1 year ago

“We” as in you are an actual member of the current Texas men’s swim team?

Yellow Submarine
Reply to  Steve Nolan
1 year ago

Punting is different from place-kicking is different from throwing, but they all affect the score of the football game. Everyone knows the rules, you get points from swimming and from diving. Dissecting the point totals with “what if’s” and “yes buts” is for those whose point totals didn’t measure up, i.e. those who lost.

Hook 'Em
Reply to  Steve Nolan
1 year ago

Maybe there should be. There are PLENTY of divers that can swim fast (Texas grad/NCAA Finalist Diver Maren Taylor could drop a 24-point 50 free without training)… And before I get any clap backs on that time **not being impressive** compared to others, it’s worth noting that no Olympic Decathletes are WORLD CLASS throwers. It’s the versatility that’s impressive. It also wouldn’t kill swimmers to learn the control and finesse required in diving–plenty of swim coaches out there who talk about how much they love a young gymnast switching over to swimming because of the base it gives them to work with. Diving is not that much different.

JimSwim22
Reply to  Hook 'Em
1 year ago

I had a buddy in high school who won our bet on most State Championship qtimes by qualifying for state in diving. I can’t do a front flip so I had to pay up.

Becky D
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

There are men’s swimming and diving programs across the country in peril of being shut down, and your suggestion is to cut one of the ropes. Nice.

mike in dallas
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

I thought we had a belly full of this “de-coupling” fantasy last year from the Cal cohort.
I guess this silly idea just never dies; Swimming & Diving — or DIVING & Swimming. . . .

Swimming is just more interesting to watch
Reply to  mike in dallas
1 year ago

Agree that the debate is largely unproductive and kudos to the schools that field strong teams across all events. But seems to me that diving is more like gymnastics that ends in water. That is in swimming, except for adjudicating illegal strokes or turns or other technical fouls, the winner is easily determined by a clock and does not need to resort to difficulty factors and judges’ scores determined by non competing humans. Even field events in track & field are won by the person who jumped highest or longest or threw the furthest, etc.

bill till
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

Not sure I understand the emotional reaction you got from the crowd for your comment. But the only thing these two sports have in common is a pool. You don’t see swimming and water polo. I have never seen a swimmer jump off a diving board, or a diver swim a set. They are two different sports, the combination is odd. No other sport is combined with a different sport in this way, that I am aware of.

Caged
Reply to  bill till
1 year ago

Because it is used as an excuse when a team that doesn’t put money towards diving loses.

Joe
Reply to  bill till
1 year ago

“Track & Field”

bill till
Reply to  Joe
1 year ago

That’s an even worse example, running and shot put, related in what way? Should be running and golf..

GoldMedalGal
Reply to  bill till
1 year ago

Throwers don’t run, they throw.

Caged
Reply to  GoldMedalGal
1 year ago

And divers don’t swim…not sure where you’re going with that one.

JudgeNot
Reply to  leo
1 year ago

I think that’d be the death of collegiate diving. And while I never did it, and don’t always understand it, I recognize it for what it is – a beautiful sport that I’d hate to see go.

Longhorn
1 year ago

Way to go Longhorn divers!

JP input is too short
1 year ago

Wow. Texas putting more up than Indiana is kind of unexpected.

mike in dallas
Reply to  JP input is too short
1 year ago

Did Steele Johnson have injuries + turn pro recently?
Wasn’t he from Indiana? Or am I just mis-remembering.

Wow
Reply to  mike in dallas
1 year ago

Purdue
Turned pro

IU Swammer
Reply to  mike in dallas
1 year ago

He’s from Purdue. But got injured near the end of the dual meet season and decided to turn pro.

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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