SwimSwam’s Top 100 For 2022: Men’s #30-21

Our Top 100 For 2022 series continues with the men’s 30th through 21st-ranked swimmers for the coming year.

The rankings are heavily weighted towards the Long Course World Championships, but also factors in other championship-level international meets, plus ISL scoring potential.

We’ll break down the list into multiple installments, so stay tuned as we continue with our lists.

These lists are, by nature, subjective. If you disagree, leave your thoughts/ranks in the comments.

See also:

#30: Gabriele Detti, Italy – Detti’s been a top contender on the men’s distance freestyle scene for the better part of the last decade, specializing in the 400 and 800. The Italian doubled up with bronze medals at the 2016 Rio Olympics, taking third in both the men’s 400 and 1500 free, and then won the World Championship title the following year in the 800 free. Having also nabbed back-to-back World Championship bronzes in the 400 free, Detti has dealt with numerous injuries of late, but still pulled through with a solid showing at the Olympics, placing sixth in the 400 in 3:44.88. The 27-year-old has 14 sub-3:45 400 free swims on his track record, and without the setbacks might’ve been in the battle for medals in Tokyo in the 800 free (owning a best of 7:40.77 from 2017, 1.1 seconds faster than the gold medal-winning time). Also a great short course swimmer, Detti rattled off a trio of 3:39 SCM 400 frees in Italy to close out the year, and if he’s firing on all cylinders, he’s got a great chance to medal in two events at LC Worlds.

#29: Shoma Sato, Japan – Sato was one of the key names to watch leading into last summer’s Olympic Games, as he appeared poised to challenge for a gold medal on home soil in the men’s 200 breaststroke. However, things went astray for the young Japanese breaststroker in Tokyo, as he fell to 10th in his best event, more than two and a half seconds slower than his time from the Olympic Trials set just a few months earlier. Sato, 20, had been on fire in the lead-up, dropping his 200 breast time from 2:07.02 (October 2020) to 2:06.78 (January 2021) to 2:06.40 (April 2021), ranking him second in the event all-time and less than three tenths shy of the world record. The steady progress made his performance at the Olympics a puzzler, and we later found out why, as it was revealed he was dealing with a hernia in his lower back during the Games. Provided he’s fully recovered, Sato will be a contender for the world title in the 200 breast in 2022. And given the progression he made prior to the injury, possibly could even challenge the 2:06-barrier.

#28: Elijah Winnington, Australia – Since the beginning of 2010, there are only four men that have been sub-3:43 in the 400 free, and three of them have won Olympic gold in the event. That would be Park Tae Hwan, Sun Yang and Mack Horton. The fourth is Winnington, who broke free from the plethora of 3:43s and clocked 3:42.65 at the Australian Olympic Trials in June, setting him up to enter his first Olympic Games as the odds-on favorite for gold. But things didn’t go as planned for the Aussie, as Winnington could only muster a time of 3:45.20 (in prelims and finals) to finish seventh overall, with his Trials time over seven-tenths quicker than what ultimately placed first. But this is likely just a bump in the road for the 21-year-old, who also made the Olympic team by hitting a PB in the 200 free (1:45.55) and then placed a distant 22nd at the Games (1:46.99). He’s made consistent drops in the 400, and now it’s just a matter of executing to the best of his abilities at the biggest meets.

Winnington PB Progression, 400 free (LCM)

  • 2018 – 3:45.98
  • 2019 – 3:44.68
  • 2020 – 3:43.90
  • 2021 – 3:42.65

Outside of Horton, he’s the fastest active swimmer in the 400 free, and while it’s now unclear how many of Australia’s best will line up at Worlds in 2022, Winnington will be among the favorites if he is. The Queensland native was also a valuable member of the London Roar in the ISL’s inaugural season, and would be a solid scorer in the league if he were to return at some point.

#27: Chase Kalisz, USA – Kalisz has always shown up when it counts, which made his 10th-place finish in the 400 IM at the 2019 World Championships all the more perplexing. The University of Georiga-trained American had been on the podium at every major competition for six consecutive years prior to that, stacking up three World Championship medals (including 2017 gold), two Pan Pacific Championship medals (including 2018 gold) and an Olympic silver medal in 2016. So after missing the 2019 final in a pedestrian time of 4:15.62, Kalisz came back and achieved his lifelong dream in Tokyo, winning Olympic gold in 4:09.42. While the time wasn’t particularly fast (Kalisz was 4:05.9 in 2017), an Olympic gold medal is an Olympic gold medal, and some questioned whether or not the 27-year-old would have the motivation to continue in the sport after completing his journey to the top of the podium. But he was back racing less than a month later for the Aqua Centurions in the ISL, and as long as he’s in the field, the Bel Air, Maryland native is a gold medal threat. The men’s 400 IM lineup is getting more crowded at the top, with nine swimmers sub-4:10 in 2021, with Kalisz’s American teammate Carson Foster leading the rankings in 4:08.46. So Kalisz will likely need to get back in the 4:07-range to be a gold medal favorite, but his ability to perform when the lights are on has pushed him ahead of some of his rivals over the course of his career and that may well continue in 2022. He’s also strong in the 200 IM, having been sub-1:56 four times. He snuck on the Olympic team in 2021, but ended up 12th in Tokyo.

#26: Noe Ponti, Switzerland – Ponti joined the elite sub-51 club in the men’s 100 butterfly at the Tokyo Olympic Games, rattling off consecutive swims of 50.76 and 50.74 to win the bronze medal behind Caeleb Dressel and Kristof Milak. Ponti, who was less than two months removed from his 20th birthday at the Games, also took 10th in the 200 fly, hitting a PB of 1:55.05 in the prelims, and is coming off of a silver medal-winning performance in the event at SC Worlds in December (1:49.81). The Swiss native is a burgeoning star with immense talent, particularly in the 100 fly, but he was also within a tenth or so of being ranked in the world’s top 10 in the 50 (23.39) and 200 fly last year. Ponti began the NCAA season at NC State, but returned home shortly after, and appears to be more comfortable in Switzerland for the time being. At least for this year, that move will probably be beneficial for his international medal hopes, with his focus remaining primarily on LCM. After winning bronze in Tokyo, Ponti will likely need to be sub-50 in the 100 fly to make his way any further up the podium. And while that’s an insane ask, racing in the same era as swimmers like Dressel and Milak will only push him to greater heights.

#25: Hwang Sunwoo, South Korea – Hwang made his way onto everybody’s radar in the Olympic lead-up at the Korean Trials in May, where the 18-year-old broke his own World Junior Record in the 200 freestyle by almost a full second in 1:44.96. Hwang had a phenomenal swim in the Olympic prelims in Tokyo, re-lowering the WJR in 1:44.62, and then in the final, attacked the race with reckless abandon. The native of Suwon, South Korea led the final by over seven-tenths with 50 meters to go, but faded and took seventh (1:45.26). He also had a standout showing in the 100 free, bringing his PB down to 47.56 in the semis before placing fifth in the final (47.82), and then topped the year off by winning the SC World title in the 200 free in Abu Dhabi. He’s also shown he’s not just a pure freestyler, popping a Korean Record of 1:58.04 in the 200 IM in October.

#24: Kieran Smith, USA – It hasn’t taken long for Smith to become the top American in the men’s 200 and 400 freestyle, parlaying his breakout 4:06.32 500 free in the yards pool in February 2020 with a phenomenal long course performance in the Olympic year. The 21-year-old University of Florida Gator swept the 200 (1:45.29) and 400 free (3:44.86) at the U.S. Olympic Trials, also taking a close third in the 200 IM, before further improving his new PBs in Tokyo. Smith won bronze in the 400 free (3:43.94), took sixth in the 200 free (1:45.12), and then moved up to #3 all-time among Americans in the 200 free leading off the 800 free relay (1:44.74), trailing only Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte. The Ridgefield, Conn., native finished 2021 ranked seventh worldwide in both events, and in December, recorded four top-six finishes individually at SC Worlds. The men’s 200/400 freestyle scene is currently full of 1:44s and 3:43s, putting Smith directly into the medal conversation.

#23: Gregorio Paltrinieri, Italy – Paltrinieri seamlessly took over the mantle from Sun Yang as the best pure distance freestyler in the world in the mid-2010s, rocketing to the 2015 World Championship title in the 1500 free in Sun’s absence in Kazan before rolling to a dominant win in Rio. The Italian has had continued success in the five years since those 2016 Olympic Games, but he’s no longer a singular dominant force in the distance free events. German Florian Wellbrock and Ukrainian Mykhailo Romanchuk recently began to challenge him for gold in the 800 and 1500 on the big stage, both having beaten him in the mile at 2019 Worlds, and then at the Tokyo Olympics, American Bobby Finke stunned all three of them by sweeping the 800 and 1500 free golds. The 27-year-old Paltrinieri did pull out a silver medal in Tokyo in the 800, but labored in the 1500 final and missed the medals. At the end of the year at SC Worlds, Paltrinieri saw his world record in the 1500 free get smashed by Wellbrock in a mind-boggling 14:06.88, though Paltrinieri did get a win over him in the 800 free at SC Euros one month earlier, setting a new European Record of 7:27.99. It’s easy to forget that Paltrinieri is only a year and a half removed from going 14:33.10 in the 1500—over six seconds faster than what won gold at the Olympics—but he only managed a 14:45.01 in the Tokyo final. There’s also the prospect that his focus will veer more towards open water in the coming years. So while Paltrinieri is still a medal contender in the distance frees, he likely lines up fourth—or maybe even fifth with the emergence of Ahmed Hafnaoui—on the depth chart after what we saw in Tokyo.

#22: Nicolo Martinenghi, Italy – Martinenghi has emerged as one of the best sprint breaststrokers in the world, coming off a big year that was highlighted by a bronze medal victory in the 100 breast at the Tokyo Olympic Games. The 22-year-old Italian was sub-58.5 five times in 2021 (best of 58.28), and also hit a blistering PB of 26.39 in the 50 breast to rank second in the world. Martinenghi is also a top performer in the short course pool, upsetting world record holder Ilya Shymanovich to win the SC Euro title in the 100 breast while winning silver in both the 50 and 100 at SC Worlds, and will surely be a medal contender on the big stage in both events moving forward. The only thing standing in his way from being higher in the rankings is how stacked the men’s sprint breast events are right now, led by Adam Peaty, who is a huge favorite to repeat as the world champion in the 50 and 100 in 2022. Perhaps nothing better exemplifies the depth of men’s breaststroke at the moment, specifically in Europe, than the fact that Martinenghi was only fifth in the 100 breast at LC Euros despite breaking 59 seconds.

#21: Mykhailo Romanchuk, Ukraine – Romanchuk falls into a similar category as Paltrinieri, having established himself as a top distance freestyler in recent years, but probably wouldn’t be penciled in as a favorite in any one event at LC Worlds. Romanchuk won silver in the 1500 and bronze in the 800 free in Tokyo, and has also picked up back-to-back World Championship silver medals in the mile. But given what Bobby Finke did at the Olympics, and what Florian Wellbrock managed to do at SC Worlds, Romanchuk is lost a little bit somewhere in the middle. But the Ukrainian is still a top medal contender. He’s been sub-14:40 four times in the 1500, including going 14:39.89 in May to win the Euro title over Paltrinieri, is coming off a strong bronze-medal effort of 14:11 at SC Worlds, and went faster in the Olympic prelims (7:41.28) than the time that won gold in the 800 free final (7:41.87). But with the guys at the top all relatively even in ability, Romanchuk hasn’t shown the closing speed (or the willingness to go out in the lead and hold on) that could push him above the others.

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SigmaAlphaBetaMale
3 months ago

Foster and Andrew in the top 20? lol. Also Kalisz is too high and Smith is too low

Sub13
Reply to  SigmaAlphaBetaMale
3 months ago

SwimSwam knows exactly what they’re doing. They’re putting Andrew in the top 20 because they know it’s controversial and will get them more comments and engagement (also because he’s American). It’s purely strategic rather than based on talent.

To use a women’s example to compare

Cate Campbell #29
50 Free: ranked 3rd for the year, 0.13 from top time, no medal
100 Free: ranked 2nd for the year, 0.47 from
top time, individual bronze medal
100 Free relay: swam final for a WR and gold
100 medley relay: swam final for an OR and gold

Michael Andrew (top 20 somehow above actual gold medallists)
50 free: ranked 4th, 0.46 from top time, no medal… Read more »

Kanye Quest
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Now I know why Australian swimmers hate Australian swim fans so much. I never got it until these threads. Y’all are legit the most smug, condescending, and incorrigible swim fans I’ve ever seen.

Sub13
Reply to  Kanye Quest
3 months ago

LOL ok dude. I guess you’ve never seen an American comment on a SwimSwam article before. If you want to disagree then feel free to, but not need to act like a self righteous nitwit.

PS If you think these rankings aren’t complete BS and biased towards Americans you’re delusional. Erika Brown swims literally one event at a competitive level and she was ranked 20th for the year in it, but four swimmers who beat her in her only event are beneath her in this list, and they all swim other events as well and all got gold medals in Tokyo while Erika didn’t. Forgive me for being skeptical.

Last edited 3 months ago by Sub13
McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Kanye Quest
3 months ago

if you want to see swimfans who are more smug, condescending, and incorrigible than this, then you only need to look at the comments about caeleb dressel on this site. compare that with how dressel actually conducts himself outside of the pool. night and day

Last edited 3 months ago by McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Killer Tofu
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

MA has the potential to go to Worlds and win 5 medals. What are you talking about? Yeah he had one bad meet. He had the #2 time in the world in the 200 IM. #3 in the 100 breast. #5 in the 100 fly. #4 in the 50 free. But methinks that maybe you underrate him because you’re Australian.

Sub13
Reply to  Killer Tofu
3 months ago

Since when do Australians have a reputation for underrating Americans? Literally for the last two years every second comment on this website has been “Aussies always choke at Olympics, they’ll never do well”. I don’t recall seeing a single Australian legitimately underestimating an American swimmer. You seem to have a pretty warped sense of perspective.

Calvin
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

I think a lot of people are underestimating MA. He was 4th in 2 of his individual events and 5th in one. I don’t think it’s fair to compare him to Cate when she was 7th in the 50 free final despite being the 2nd fastest performer last year. And in terms of this list, it’s based on potential and MA is actually really good in all of the 50’s (finalist in all the strokes despite not medaling in Gwangju). Also, he’s 22 while Cate is 29, so judging his talent -and potential- just because he didn’t medal individually at the Olympics is just unfair.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

As far as I’m aware Cate isn’t even back into full training yet and is probably gonna skip Worlds so she’s not a good comparison. Andrew deserves to be in the top 20 based on times and versatility alone because the list isn’t about past medals but future potential in 2022. It’s predictive.

Last edited 3 months ago by Troyy
Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

Look that’s fair enough so maybe she wasn’t the best comparison to make in that regard. But I stand by my point. There are multiple people who won individual medals, including individual gold, and/or ranked first in an event who are outside the top 20 and MA completely failed at the Olympics.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

It’s not even exclusive to americans either. morozov has one individual major medal – a wc silver from 2013, and hasn’t made a single individual olympic final. yet he was still ranked 20 places higher than bruno and flo, who were two of the most consistent 50 freestylers of the last decade. there’s a strong chance that either bruno or flo will medal in fukuoka, and a solid chance that both of them make it

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

It’s not even exclusive to americans either. morozov has one individual major medal – a wc silver from 2013, and hasn’t made a single individual olympic final. yet he was still ranked 20 places higher than bruno and flo, who were two of the most consistent 50 freestylers of the last decade. there’s a strong chance that either bruno or flo will medal at worlds, and a solid chance that both of them make it

Mclovin
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Why dont you include his 100m butterfly? He is ranked 5th in the world with the time he achieved in a ProSwimSeries meet. He is a medal contender in at least 4 different individual events, he is also the swimmer with the most events ranking in the top 5. I know people dont like MA, but you take the hate to ridiculous heights

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Mclovin
3 months ago

maybe because he’ll drop the 50 free or 100 fly at worlds? he dropped the 100 fly last year because of a clash, and even then the finals weren’t on the same day. they are this year, and he’s more competitive in the 50 free

Troyy
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

He didn’t swim a tapered 100 fly and was already 50.80.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

taper and ma don’t go together

Troyy
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

I used to think that too but he had a decent drop at Olympic trials in the 200 IM (1:56.84 -> 1:55.26) and 100 breast (58.67 -> 58.14) so there’s no reason to think he wouldn’t also in the 100 fly (50.80 -> ??).

Sub13
Reply to  Mclovin
3 months ago

In what way am I “taking hate to serious heights”. Literally all I’ve said is he underperformed at the Olympics and I don’t think he should be in the top 20. How is that hateful?

Rafael
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Americans does not underperform, they allow others to win. They could sweep all OG if they wanted to

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Rafael
3 months ago

quote lilly king, 2020 us olympic trials

Rafael
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

Bolt just won a lot because usa track and field allowed.

observer
3 months ago

Martinenghi better than Paltrinieri ?? If it isn’t a mistake, it’s more than ridiculous.

AnEn
Reply to  observer
3 months ago

I don’t think so. Paltrinieri right now isn’t a medal favorite in any event, while Martinenghi is a medal favorite in the 100 breast and maybe also the 50 breast. I think Paltrinieri should focus on the open water. I absolutely don’t see him a medal in the pool in Paris.

Calvin
Reply to  AnEn
3 months ago

While I agree Martinenghi should definitely be higher than Paltrinieri, I think it’s a mistake to dismiss him by saying he isn’t a medal favorite. He’s not a gold medal favorite anymore with the rise of Wellbrock, Romanchuk, etc, but he got silver in the 800 in Tokyo despite having mono a month before, plus a bronze in OW and a 4th place finish in the 1500. And, this list is focusing in Fukuoka, not Paris. A lot can happen in 2 years.

observer
Reply to  AnEn
3 months ago

Paltrinieri will not focus only in OW and, unless problems (such as monucleosis ) he is one of the best candidate for gold in 800 and 1500 in Paris. Martinenghi as to wait that peaty and kamminga disappear in both 50 and 100 but are not so old.

Sam
3 months ago

It says that Chase Kalisz made it on the U.S. Olympic team in Tokyo 2021 but placed 12th in the 400 IM which is far from true because he won gold. So that is false information and he is better than what is written in his paragraph.

Admin
Reply to  Sam
3 months ago

No it doesn’t. It says he made the team and was 12th in the 200 IM, which is absolutely true.

Chad
3 months ago

Hwang is too low on this list given his trajectory. Also I don’t think Kalisz should be this high. He seemed like he was ready for his sunset after he won gold this summer.

HJones
Reply to  Chad
3 months ago

I know he won gold, but that time was relatively uninspiring, and I believe if Borodin had gotten a chance to swim he’d have won. Pretty much irrelevant in the 200 IM as well, and I’d bet on him not even making the team in that event.

AnEn
3 months ago

For me Martinenghi, Sato, Detti and Ponti are ranked too high, while Smith is ranked too low. The rest seems about right, although you could certainly discuss about the order.

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
3 months ago

Sorry Shymanovich ahead of Martinenghi, presumably because one can stomp over weak ISL fields, is a bit of a joke.

Shymanovich didn’t crack 59 through 3 rounds of 100 breaststroke at the Olympics, and has a history of underperforming when it counts the most, particularly long course.

Martinenghi is 5 years younger, and swims good times in meets that count. Oh, and has an Olympic bronze medal.

Not sure why Kieran Smith is above Hwang too, I’d guess it’s because of the 400 being a relatively weak field? Hwang is faster in the 200, and although Smith’s 3:43.9 won him a bronze, I’d argue that a 47.5 in the 100 is much more impressive.

elyk

I agree that it’s probably the field that makes the difference here in 100 vs 400 free, Hwang has to deal with Dressel, Chalmers, Kolesnikov, Popovici and a lot more more whereas 400 free isn’t too strong right now

AnEn

Isn’t Smith also pretty good in the individual medley’s? Hwang on the other hand “only” has two good events.

Human Ambition
3 months ago

Leaving Greg’s OW-medal out of the text is naive when we know him and Flo targeted that race heavy.

alex t
Reply to  Human Ambition
3 months ago

Paltrinieri caught mononucleosis 3 weeks before the Olympics. It was a miracle he managed to get in the water, let alone medal. And as for WSC in Abu Dhabi, he said he’d been trying some new stuff with his coach and it backfired horribly!

Sub13
3 months ago

I’m interested to see where Kyle and ZSC, the only Aussies left, will end up. Both obviously in the top 20, both obviously very strong medal contenders in their main event and both realistically in striking distance of a world record. Neither has really shined in a second event at this stage. Despite the gold medal, I am tempted to rank ZSC below Kyle purely because ZSC doesn’t seem to have any medal potential in a second event, with his 50/100 breast being well off any realistic chance at a medal and (as with a lot of breaststrokers) he doesn’t seem to swim another stroke.

In short course, Kyle swam an Oceanic Record in the 50 Free (3rd for the… Read more »

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

For some reason Kyle is better at 50s in short course than long course so I wouldn’t get too excited about him being a contender in the long course 50s this year. If anything I think he’ll pick up the 100 fly.

Rafael
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

Kyle seems like someone who needs a wall to start accelerating and does not “start” so well from the block and go all out since the beginning..

ANd I think Manadou and Fratus will stick until Paris (Manadou for sure)

Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

Yeah fair enough.

He hasn’t swum a long course 100 fly for almost 3 years where he was a 52.07, which obviously is nowhere near a medal, but presumably he has improved since then. His SCM 100 Fly is slower than his LCM and is from 2016, so doesn’t really make sense to make any judgments off that.

Before this year, his 50 Fly SCM PB was 23.72 from 2016, but this year he dropped 1.5 seconds off it. His LCM 50 PB is 24.03 from 2014. If he dropped 1.5 seconds off that he would beat the silver time from 2019 Worlds.

I wouldn’t say he has a strong chance for a medal in a 50, but if we’re… Read more »

STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Didn’t Chalmers go 51.37 in the 100BF in a domestic meet in 2020? If he makes a full recovery I see it being his second best event.

Sub13
Reply to  STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
3 months ago

FINA has his PB as 52.07 from April 2019 so that’s what I was going off, but sounds like I might be wrong.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

He went 51.37 untapered early 2020 leading into Tokyo and at that time they were considering adding it to his program for Tokyo but then the shoulder injury happened. For comparison he was only 48.27 at the same meet in the 100 free so he’d probably have tapered to a 50 something in the 100 fly.

Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

FINA has his PB as 52.07 but I guess they didn’t recognise his 51? I’m not really sure how that all works and usually just go off FINA to look at past performances.

If he was a 51.37 untapered then yeah a 50 mid wouldn’t be out of the question which would put him in solid medal contention.

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

FINA’s website is quite poor because it’s often missing swims from smaller meets. There’s really no website that has anywhere near a complete record of results but I typically check SA’s results DB and swimrankings.net. Between the two you can typically get a good idea for Australian swimmers.

Sub13
Reply to  Troyy
3 months ago

I’ve looked on SA which does have the 51.37, but hasn’t been updated since 1 August lol. Swimrankings doesn’t have the 51.37 either. Lol I guess I won’t get too much into stats because it seems like a huge hassle

Troyy
Reply to  Sub13
3 months ago

Check the results database instead of the ranking PDFs: https://www.swimming.org.au/events/results-central

The SA website needs to be tossed in the trash.

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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