2017 NCAA Division III Men: Final Scores and Wrap-up

  5 Anne Lepesant | March 19th, 2017 | College, NCAA Division III, News

2017 Division III Men’s Swimming and Diving Championships

  • Wednesday, March 15 – Saturday, March 18
  • CISD Natatorium, Shenandoah, Texas
  • Live results

After 13 top-three team finishes at the NCAA Division III Championships, including a third in 2016, the Emory men’s swimming and diving team won its first national title in Shenandoah, Texas, on Saturday. The Eagles were buoyed by Male Swimmer of the Meet, senior Andrew Wilson, who had the Midas touch and then some. Not only did just about every event he touch turn to gold, but with Division III records to boot. Indeed, Wilson contributed individual national titles and their concomitant D3 records in the 200 IM, 100 breast and 200 breast individually, and as part of the 200 medley and 400 medley relays. Emory junior Oliver Smith added a victory in the 50 fly on Wednesday, and anchored the Eagles’ winning 200 free and 400 free relays.

It wasn’t so much that Emory significantly outscored their psych sheet seedings, as much as it was just that they did what was expected of them. The Eagles had their ups and downs throughout the weekend’s events, but as an ensemble they performed well, getting 15 swimmers and 5 relays into A finals, and 4 swimmers into B finals. They also had a bit of luck. 2016 national champions, Denison, had a difficult time hitting their prelims swims, which cost them approximately 61 points and a shot at a repeat title.

Williams had an excellent meet, moving from an anticipated ninth place to seventh in the team standings. Senior Benjamin Lin, like Wilson, won all three of his individual events (100 back, 100 fly, and 200 back). Moreover, he broke the Division III record in the 100 back, and his leadoffs helped Williams score fourth in the 200 medley relay and second in the 400 medley relay. Kenyon did better than expected in a handful of events, including double-scoring relays; the Lords passed their rivals Denison to finish second in the standings.

A handful of teams, including WPI, Chicago, Santa Cruz, NYU, Wash U, Tufts, Carnegie Mellon and Pomona-Pitzer, rose in the standings thanks to a breakout star, or a well-timed relay performance. On the other hand, MIT, Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, and Wisconsin-Eau Claire all had not one, but two, relays disqualified, costing them dearly. Rowan, NYU, and Wisconsin-LaCrosse also suffered relay DQs.

Final Scoring Analysis

Team +/- Psych   Psych Sheet Prelims Finals
Emory University 20 418 445 438
Kenyon College 45 339 389 384
Denison University -61 432 381 371
Johns Hopkins University -12 307 302 295
New York University 35.5 208 267 243.5
Washington University (MO) 28 195 217 223
Williams College 64 152 177 216
Mass Institute of Technology -70 259 264 189
Rowan University -14 153 123 139
Tufts University 23 103 120 126
University of Chicago 30 72 90 102
The College of New Jersey -8 109 84 101
Albion College -1 101 101 100
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 3 94 96 97
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point -26 114 95 88
Worcester Polytechnic Institute 40 32 70 72
Keene State 4 45 47 49
Pomona-Pitzer 21 25 52 46
Carnegie Mellon University 22 23 43 45
Amherst College -26.5 62 42 35.5
UC Santa Cruz 24 11 37 35
SUNY Fredonia 3 28 33 31
SUNY Geneseo -4 33 24 29
Bates College -10 37 17 27
Gustavus Adolphus College 10 16 27 26
University of Mary Washington 9 15 20 24
Widener University 10 14 20 24
DePauw University 16 7 23 23
Loras College -9 31 21 22
Union College (NY) -10 32 24 22
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire -16 36 27 20
Bowdoin College -21 39 12 18
U.S. Coast Guard Academy -7 24 18 17
Cal Lutheran -5 21 18 16
Linfield College 6 8 10 14
Wheaton College (IL) -5 19 11 14
Calvin College -7 19 12 12
Connecticut College -40 52 25 12
Gettysburg College -14 26 18 12
Buffalo State College -9 20 13 11
Case Western Reserve 5 6 14 11
St. Lawrence 6 3 6 9
California Institute of Technology -4 10 4 6
Middlebury College -3 9 6 6
John Carroll University -1 6 2 5
Lake Forest College 2 3 6 5
Hope College 1 3 7 4
SUNY Brockport -1 5 7 4
Whitman College -9 12 2 3
Birmingham-Southern College -8 9 3 1
Trinity University -4 5 1 1
University of St. Thomas -12 13 2 1

In This Story

Leave a Reply

5 Comments on "2017 NCAA Division III Men: Final Scores and Wrap-up"

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted

A really great meet to watch, and an exciting turn in the arc of DIII swimming – second only to when Denison broke the Kenyon streak in my opinion. All of these swimmers are being made better by the improved depth and competitiveness in D3. Other teams, MIT in particular I think, will be likely to rise up and challenge in coming years. Compared to where things were in the 2000s – where one team just totally dominated the competition – this is an exciting turn of events to have a much more evenly dispersed field. Better for all competitors, as well as spectators (:

Incredibly exciting meet to watch in person but several of the relay DQs were suspect if not wrong. The reaction timing system was malfunctioning causing officials to go to video for subjective reviews. Other videos clearly showed some of the DQs were called inaccurately. It wouldn’t have made a difference in the standings at the top of the leaderboard but very discouraging for several teams nonetheless.

the announcer on the livefeed said that having the “fins” on the blocks was what was causing the relay reaction system to not work properly because some swimmers were beginning their stance on top of the fin where there is no sensor. Big flaw and definitely cost some teams points.

“They also had a bit of luck”? Seriously Anne? As is the case every year, the best team that showed up won the meet. Emory quantitatively swam faster and scored more points. Passively invalidating an incredible performance by chalking it up to ‘luck’ is not appreciated. Never tell an athlete that they do not have ownership over their own success.

Although I agree with you 100%, I just wanted to add that it also isn’t right to chalk up a team’s success to the coaches. The coaches may do a good job but they are not the main reason the swimmers succeeded. These swimmers did it themselves and the coaches helped facilitate it.

wpDiscuz

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four teenage daughters, all of whom swim. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently a …

Read More »