Rewind and Watch All the Race Videos from Night 4 of the 2021 Men’s NCAAs

2021 NCAA MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

  • When: Wednesday, March 24 – Saturday, March 27, 2021
  • Where: Greensboro Aquatic Center / Greensboro, NC (Eastern Time Zone)
  • Prelims 10 AM/ Finals 6 PM (Local Time)
  • Short course yards (SCY) format
  • Defending champion: Cal (1x) – 2019 results
  • Streaming:
  • Championship Central
  • Psych Sheets
  • Live Results

Day 4 Finals Recap

The 2021 Men’s NCAA Championships have come to a close, with the Texas Longhorns sealing the team championship title over the Cal Bears. The Greensboro Aquatic Center saw the finals of the 1650 free, 200 back, 100 free, 200 breast, 200 fly, and 400 free relay on Saturday evening. Here’s a rundown of highlights from the last finals session:

  • Picking up his second NCAA title of the meet was Florida’s Bobby Finke, who swam the 3rd-fastest performance of all-time.
  • It was a tight duel between Texas A&M’s Shaine Casas and Cal’s Destin Lasco in the 200 back final, with Casas frightening the 2016 American record with his winning time of 1:35.75. Lasco took second at 1:35.99, becoming the 3rd swimmer to break 1:36 in the event. Casas also earned a perfect 3-for-3 title sweep after previously winning the 200 IM and 100 back.
  • Cal’s Ryan Hoffer also earned his 3rd title of the weekend with his win in the 100 free, adding the title to his earlier titles in the 50 free and 100 fly. Hoffer took 0.01s off his morning pool record at 40.89, affirming himself as the 4th-fastest American in the event ever. Texas Longhorns Drew Kibler and Daniel Krueger tied for second place behind Hoffer while Cal freshman Bjorn Seeliger took fourth.
  • Minnesota’s Max McHugh and Cal’s Reece Whitley swam neck-and-neck throughout the entire 200 breast final. At the finish, McHugh picked up his second NCAA title of the meet in a new pool record of 1:49.02. After recovering from a gunshot wound in July 2019, junior McHugh is now a two-time NCAA champion and the 5th-fastest 200 breaststroker in history. Whitley settled for second at 1:49.54.
  • Cal’s Trenton Julian led the majority of the 200 fly championship final until Louisville’s Nicolas Albiero turned it over and took over Julian’s lead for the 2021 title. Albiero won his first individual NCAA title, as well as taking 0.01s off his 2020 pool record at 1:38.64. Julian took second place at 1:38.85.
  • Out of heat four of five, the Cal Bears ran down the Florida Gators to win their first 400 free relay NCAA title since 2011.
  • The Texas Longhorns secured the 2021 team championship title with 595 points, making it head coach Eddie Reese‘s 15th NCAA team title in five different decades.

1650 FREE – TIMED FINALS

  • NCAA Record: 14:12.08, Bobby Finke (Florida) – 2020
  • American Record: 14:12.08, Bobby Finke (Florida) – 2020
  • U.S. Open Record: 14:12.08, Bobby Finke (Florida) – 2020
  • Meet Record: 14:22.41, Clark Smith (Texas) – 2017
  • Pool Record: 14:23.52, Connor Jaeger (Club Wolverine) – 2014
  • 2019 Champion: Felix Auboeck (Michigan), 14:23.09
  • 2020 Top Performer: Bobby Finke (Florida), 14:12.08

Top 3: 

  1. Bobby Finke (Florida)- 14:12.52 *Meet/Pool Record
  2. Jake Magahey (Georgia)- 14:28.69
  3. Ross Dant (NC State)- 14:31.17

200 BACK – FINALS

  • NCAA Record: 1:35.73, Ryan Murphy (Cal) – 2016
  • American Record: 1:35.73, Ryan Murphy (Cal) – 2016
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:35.73, Ryan Murphy (Cal) – 2016
  • Meet Record: 1:35.73, Ryan Murphy (Cal) – 2016
  • Pool Record: 1:37.19, Destin Lasco (Cal) – 2021
  • 2019 Champion: John Shebat (Texas), 1:36.42
  • 2020 Top Performer: Shaine Casas (Texas A&M), 1:37.20

Top 3:

  1. Shaine Casas (Texas A&M)- 1:35.75 *Pool Record
  2. Destin Lasco (Cal)- 1:35.99
  3. Bryce Mefford (Cal)- 1:38.31

100 FREE – FINALS

  • NCAA Record: 39.90, Caeleb Dressel (Florida) – 2018
  • American Record: 39.90, Caeleb Dressel (Florida) – 2018
  • U.S. Open Record: 39.90, Caeleb Dressel (Florida) – 2018
  • Meet Record: 39.90, Caeleb Dressel (Florida) – 2018
  • Pool Record: 40.90, Ryan Hoffer (Cal) – 2021
  • 2019 Champion: Dean Farris (Harvard), 40.80
  • 2020 Top Performer: Daniel Krueger (Texas), 41.26

Top 3:

  1. Ryan Hoffer (Cal)- 40.89 *Pool Record
  2. Drew Kibler/Daniel Krueger (Texas)- 41.59
  3. (tie)

200 BREAST – FINALS

  • NCAA Record: Will Licon (Texas), 2017 – 1:47.91
  • American Record: Will Licon (Texas), 2017 – 1:47.91
  • U.S. Open Record: Will Licon (Texas), 2017 – 1:47.91
  • Meet Record: Will Licon (Texas), 2017 – 1:47.91
  • Pool Record: Reece Whitley (Cal), 2021 – 1:49.87
  • 2019 Champion: Andrew Seliskar (Cal), 1:48.70
  • 2020 Top Performer: Reece Whitley (Cal), 1:49.85

Top 3:

  1. Max McHugh (Minnesota)- 1:49.02 *Pool Record
  2. Reece Whitley (Cal)- 1:49.54
  3. Hugo Gonzalez (Cal)- 1:51.20

200 FLY – FINALS

  • NCAA Record: Jack Conger (Texas), 2017 – 1:37.37
  • American Record: Jack Conger (Texas), 2017 – 1:37.37
  • U.S. Open Record: Jack Conger (Texas), 2017 – 1:37.37
  • Meet Record: Jack Conger (Texas), 2017 – 1:37.37
  • Pool Record: Nicolas Albiero (Louisville), 2021 – 1:38.65
  • 2019 Champion: Andreas Vazaios (NC State), 1:38.57
  • 2020 Top Performer: Nicolas Albiero (Louisville), 1:38.65

Top 3:

  1. Nicolas Albiero (Louisville)- 1:38.64 *Pool Record
  2. Trenton Julian (Cal)- 1:38.85
  3. Antani Ivanov (Virginia Tech)- 1:39.26

400 FREE RELAY – TIMED FINALS

  • NCAA Record: 2:44.31, NC State — 2018
  • American Record: 2:44.31, NC State — 2018
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:44.31, NC State — 2018
  • Meet Record: 2:44.31, NC State — 2018
  • Pool Record: 2:45.69, NC State — 2018
  • 2019 Champion: Texas, 2:45.12
  • 2020 Top Performer: Texas, 2:46.57

Top 3: 

  1. Cal- 2:46.60
  2. Florida- 2:46.88
  3. Louisville- 2:47.98

FINAL TEAM SCORES

  1. Texas 595
  2. Cal 568
  3. Florida 367
  4. Georgia 268
  5. Louisville 211
  6. Indiana 207
  7. Ohio State 180
  8. NC State 164
  9. Virginia 152
  10. Texas A&M 151
  11. Virginia Tech 135
  12. Michigan/Arizona 106
  13. (tie)
  14. Stanford 99
  15. Alabama 91
  16. Mizzou 86
  17. Purdue 83
  18. LSU 68
  19. Miami 54
  20. Tennessee 48
  21. Georgia Tech/Minnesota 40
  22. (tie)
  23. Florida State 32.5
  24. UNC 31
  25. Notre Dame 29
  26. Pittsburgh 28
  27. USC 21
  28. Wisconsin 20
  29. Utah 17.5
  30. Kentucky 14
  31. Penn State 13
  32. West Virginia 5

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Swammer
4 months ago

NCAA / USA Swimming has to do something about officiating of breaststroke. Couldn’t quite tell which lane from the camera angle on the reply but the single left leg kick in lane 2 (?) in the 200 BR was so egregious, and was so obviously propulsive.

I would humbly suggest changing the rules so that the camera official can initiate a DQ. I believe today the camera/replay can only overturn a DQ called from the deck, but I suspect a lot of these breaststroke violations are very difficult to spot from the deck.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
Reply to  Swammer
4 months ago

Wow you are right. A quite obvious flutter kick by the left leg at the end of the kick. I believe that is Pumputis.

Coach Rob
Reply to  Swammer
4 months ago

It happens at 3:14. So egregious.

Rain Xiang
Reply to  Swammer
4 months ago

exactly, as an stroke and turn official, from my experience I believe it is hard to find this DQ due to the splash.

Coach Rob
4 months ago

Thank you for posting these videos all in one place! Question though, I’ve been looking for the women’s 400 IM finals race video from last week and I can’t seem to find it. Anyone know where it is?

small bird
4 months ago

does anyone have a vid of eddie pwning rowdy in the post meet interview

ALEXANDER POP-OFF
4 months ago

Disappointed for Whitley. Others have commented but with an overhaul of his technique, he could be the best breaststroke in the US. He does not seem to get enough out of his catch and kick. He could get so much more power out of his stroke. And then how to figure out increasing tempo when he needs it. Who are other unusually tall bstrokers? Balandin? What do you all think? Does he need Looze?

JimCorbeau
Reply to  ALEXANDER POP-OFF
4 months ago

Caspar Corbeau is 6’ 6”.

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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