Relay Lineups: Simone Manuel Draws In For Americans On Women’s 4×100 Free

2020 TOKYO SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES

Simone Manuel will anchor the United States in this morning’s women’s 400 freestyle relay final, a potential move that’s been a hot topic of late coming to fruition after Manuel failed to advance to the 100 free final at the U.S. Olympic Trials.

The U.S. brings in the top-two finishers from Trials in Erika Brown and Abbey Weitzeil, who will go 1-2 on the relay, and then Natalie Hinds will be the only remaining member of the prelim team after recording the top split in 53.28.

Manuel is the reigning Olympic and two-time world champion in the individual 100 free, but after being diagnosed with overtraining syndrome earlier in the year, only mustered a ninth-place finish in Omaha in a time of 54.17—over two seconds off her personal best (52.04).

It’s worth noting that the head coach of the American women’s team is Greg Meehan, who also coaches Manuel at Stanford.

Catie Deloof, who split 53.42 on the prelim relay, gets left off for finals, as does Katie Ledecky and Torri Huske, who were outside shots to get the nod if the Americans were looking to really shake things up.

Other key changes include the Australians opting for Bronte Campbell (52.82 relay split) over Mollie O’Callaghan (53.08 lead-off) from the prelim relay, while Meg Harris stays and Emma McKeon and Cate Campbell come in. McKeon and Campbell will back-end the relay, and rank first and second in the world this year in the individual event, respectively.

The Canadians will bring in Maggie MacNeil in place of Taylor Ruck after Ruck split 54.16 this morning. MacNeil had a solid 100 fly prelim swim, and owns a flat-start best of 54.02.

The Dutch have brought in Kira Toussaint for Marritt Steenbergen, and the Chinese have not altered their lineup from the heats, opting to leave off Zhang Yufei and Yang Junxuan.

Sarah Sjostrom will get a second crack at a flat-start time as Sweden’s lead-off swimmer, coming off a strong 52.95 in the prelims. The same goes for Denmark’s Pernille Blume, who was 53.15 going first in the heats.

The Swedes have also switched up their fourth swimmer, adding breaststroker Sophie Hansson for Sara Junevik, who split 55.86 in the prelims.

The British team swam the same order in the prelims as they did in winning the European Championships in May, setting National Records in both, but have switched things up here. Anna Hopkin will now lead-off, with Abbie Wood moving from third to second and Lucy Hope now going third instead of first. Freya Anderson remains in the anchor position.

WOMEN’S 4×100 FREESTYLE RELAY LINEUPS

  • World Record: Australia (Jack, Campbell, McKeon, Campbell) – 3:30.05 (2018)
  • Olympic Record: Australia (McKeon, Elmslie, Campbell, Campbell) – 3:30.65 (2016)
  • World Junior Record: Canada (Ruck, Oleksiak, Smith, Sanchez) – 3:36.19 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Australia (McKeon, Elmslie, Campbell, Campbell) – 3:30.65
  • SwimSwam Event Preview – Women’s 4×100 Freestyle Relay
  1. Denmark (Blume, Bro, Jensen, Ottesen)
  2. United States (Brown, Weitzeil, Hinds, Manuel)
  3. Canada (Sanchez, MacNeil, Smith, Oleksiak)
  4. Australia (B.Campbell, Harris, McKeon, C.Campbell)
  5. Netherlands (Busch, Kromowidjojo, Toussaint, Heemskerk)
  6. Great Britain (Hopkin, Wood, Hope, Anderson)
  7. China (Cheng, Zhu, Ai, Wu)
  8. Sweden (Sjostrom, Coleman, L.Hansson, S.Hansson)

In This Story

70
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
70 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Philip Johnson
2 months ago

Interesting, I think they will be in the hunt for a minor medal.

Yoo
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

Depends on what Manuel does, if she goes a 54 they will finish 3rd or 4th but if she goes high 52 then they will easily finish 2nd.

Wildcat
Reply to  Yoo
2 months ago

If she goes a 54, they will not get 3rd

TeamDressel
Reply to  Yoo
2 months ago

C mon she won’t go 54. Slowest she goes is 53.5. Since she is anchoring I think she’ll be able to go 52

NJones
Reply to  Yoo
2 months ago

Not easily

Go Relay Go
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

A minor medal? That’s offensive to every silver and bronze medalist at the Olympics. I wasn’t aware that any medal at the Olympics is “minor”.

Jess
2 months ago

Bronte not known to have a great flatstart compared to her takeover, interesting choice.

Troyy
Reply to  Jess
2 months ago

McKeon and Bronte should be switched because McKeon’s flat start is better than her fly start.

ice
Reply to  Jess
2 months ago

Probably to give Emma more rest and to avoid having a rookie start. If Madi had made the finals, she’d probably have started. This is likely also the reason why Bronte was chosen for the finals ahead of Mollie – experienced hands no matter what

Jack
Reply to  ice
2 months ago

I think you’re exactly right about the experience. Australia’s biggest rival here is the DQ.

Swimpop
2 months ago

Yay USA, seeded second!! Wait,how does this work?

PenguinMan
Reply to  Swimpop
2 months ago

Manuel has a 52 flat seed time

Roch
Reply to  Swimpop
2 months ago

Lane 2, not the second seed.

Harry Nuhtsachs
Reply to  Roch
2 months ago

But there are only 5 lanes so it’s the middle of the pool

Parker
Reply to  Harry Nuhtsachs
2 months ago

what? there are 8 lanes. the article shows the 8 teams in the heat.

Admin
Reply to  Parker
2 months ago

Must’ve gotten stuck on rowing (which uses 5 lanes in most preliminary rounds).

trswimmer2
2 months ago

You go swimone!!!!

BTH
2 months ago

Big if true

Nugget
2 months ago

There had to be a time trial in camp. I doubt this decision was made on a whim.

Bruh
Reply to  Nugget
2 months ago

I have to agree

Cate
Reply to  Nugget
2 months ago

Yes, that IS how they do it, just like in all the other previous Olympics.

Mr Piano
2 months ago

Guys, the coaches make these decisions from what they see at training camp. This is the right decision.

Joel Lin
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Hope so. Meehan bet all of his credibility on this.

Cate
Reply to  Joel Lin
2 months ago

Not really. Also it’s not one coach’s decision. Have you not watched previous Olympic games?

Swim nerd
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Hopefully you will be right about that

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Oh, absolutely agreed. And even if Simone has looked like garbage since Trials, given the positioning of the US relay – absolutely scrapping to medal – that upside is too much imo.

And to say nothing of like, the usual US desire to get stars as many medals as possible, wouldn’t be surprised that if she swims well enough tonight that she makes it on some medleys.

Joel Lin
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Bring back UCLA Bruins men’s swimming!

Cate
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Everybody here forgot about that. This also must have been their first Olympics to watch or else they’re very young and don’t remember past Olympic relay selections.

MTK
2 months ago

I think it’s worth the gamble. The downside risk is probably that she swims a bit slower than Deloof (53.high maybe) but the upside is that she drops a 52.mid and solidifies them in the medals.

TeamDressel
Reply to  MTK
2 months ago

She won’t be 53 high. She was 54.1 or 2 at trials when she missed the final but also went 53.8 in season. I say she goes 52

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

Read More »