Dressel Lowers 100 Free American Record To 47.17, Strikes Gold

2017 FINA WORLD SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

After breaking the eight-year-old 100 free American record leading off the 400 free relay on day 1, Caeleb Dressel did it once again in the final of the individual event, striking gold.

Coming into the meet Dressel held a PB of 47.91, set at the Olympics, but he blew the doors open with a 47.26 lead-off to erase David Walters‘ 2009 mark of 47.33 off the books.

On day 4 he qualified 2nd through to the final in 47.66, and with the pressure on he didn’t flinch. Dressel was out two one-hundredths slower than his lead-off leg in 22.31, but stormed home in 24.86 to win the gold medal by a whopping seven tenths of a second in 47.17. He was the fastest man opening up, and only Australian Jack Cartwright (24.85), who placed 7th, came back faster.

He maintains his position as the 7th fastest performer in history, but gets on the board of top performances in history with the 10th fastest of all-time, and 3rd fastest post-2009.

Check out a comparison of Dressel’s splits in his two American record performances:

  • Dressel – 400 FR Relay lead-off: 22.29 / 24.97 = 47.26
  • Dressel – 100 FR Final: 22.31 / 24.86 = 47.17

Behind Dressel, fellow American Nathan Adrian closed strong in 24.90 to run-down France’s Mehdy Metella and win the silver in 47.87 to Metella’s 47.89. Cameron McEvoy, the fastest ever in a textile at 47.04, took 4th in 47.92.

The 20-year-old Dressel wins his first ever individual World Championship medal, and gives the U.S. the 100 free World title for the first time since 2001 when Anthony Ervin won gold in Fukuoka.

Now three golds deep, Dressel still has a hefty schedule left with the 50 free and 100 fly individually, as well as the men’s 4×100 medley, and potentially the mixed 4×100 free and men’s 4×200 free.

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A non-e mouse
4 years ago

He’s pretty fast

Pvdh
4 years ago

Throwback to that time Bobo said Metella could “blow away the Americans in the last 20m”

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Pvdh
4 years ago

Haha – he wont like the way things went than

DDias
Reply to  Pvdh
4 years ago

Metella tried to open strong like Dressel and died at the end.
Metella semis:22.95/24.70
Final:22.58/25.31
A bit of a suicide run.

Pvdh
Reply to  DDias
4 years ago

Stupid race strategy.

Mr. Nice Guy
4 years ago

Impressive but Schooling told to Singapore media that he went 46.8 few weeks back…in training

Jack
Reply to  Mr. Nice Guy
4 years ago

Cue the confetti, we’ve just had our 10,000th iteration of this joke!

lilaswimmer
Reply to  Jack
4 years ago

it wont stop until 100 fly,

mbl
Reply to  Mr. Nice Guy
4 years ago

Apparently it was out to a 200

M Palota
4 years ago

That is a special swim by a special athlete.

TNM
4 years ago

This is the fastest all-time at the international stage, post-2009. Magnussen and McEvoy swam their 47.0 races at Australian Olympic trials. Dressel performs well when it matters.

M Palota
Reply to  TNM
4 years ago

Yep. No argument from me. A big-time swim in a final at a major international meet. That’s the benchmark for performance under pressure. As impressive as McEvoy’s & Magnussen’s swims were – and they were – Dresel’s is different. Finals are nervy affairs, especially in the sprints. Full marks and an exceptionally impressive effort.

gregor
Reply to  M Palota
4 years ago

Magnussen has won this race twice, obviously under performing

SchoolingFTW
Reply to  gregor
4 years ago

Adrian actually has never won worlds gold, and he has never gone closer to that 47.5 Olympics final.

M Palota
Reply to  SchoolingFTW
4 years ago

Adrian is the consummate racer, though, and has been the most consistent performer – in terms of results – in the event. (Save 2015 Worlds.)

M Palota
Reply to  gregor
4 years ago

For record, Maggie’s performance in Shanghai was off the hook.

sven
Reply to  TNM
4 years ago

Agreed. One thing I was thinking about was that Caeleb is the only guy to go 47low twice in textile. Magnussen had a ridiculous run where he was consistently going 47highs in season, but he only did that 47.1 once (and I believe his second fastest is 47.49). McEvoy is no stranger to 47highs either, but so far it’s looking like he’ll struggle to make it back under 47.5 as well.

AvidSwimFan
4 years ago

Congrats to Dressel on his first international individual title. That start, that turn, that finish, perfect race.

Illinois Swim Fan
4 years ago

WHERE COULD WE GET MIZUNOS? THESE COLORWAYS ARE SICK

Dag
Reply to  Illinois Swim Fan
4 years ago

Seriously…they’re awesome! As far as buying a regular Mizuno, you need to get them on a global market website …rakuten I think it’s called. I want one too!

DDias
4 years ago

THAT start and turn… another world.

KeithM
Reply to  DDias
4 years ago

The start yes. but the turn wasn’t anything special. In fact a couple swimmers seemed to gain on him. Dressel was much better off the wall on the relay.

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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