Carson Foster Clocks 8:59 1000 Free In Longhorns’ Win Over Incarnate Word

Texas v. Incarnate Word

  • Friday, October 8, 2021
  • Lee & Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center, Austin, TX
  • SCY
  • Dual Meet Format
  • Live Results
  • Score: Texas 194, Incarnate Word 98

Two weeks after throwing down the normal (for that meet) fast times in their annual Orange-White intrasquad, the Texas Longhorn men got their dual meet season underway by hosting Incarnate Word.

Sophomore Carson Foster dabbled in some long course distance free events this summer after just missing an Olympic berth in the 400 IM, and tonight he made his college 1000 free debut with a 8:59.93 victory in that event. As of the moment, that’s the fastest time in the nation in this still-very-young season. According to the SWIMS database, that’s the only second time he’s ever swum that event, with his previous swim being a 10:26.79 effort back in 2014 when he was 12. Foster battled his classmate David Johnston, who is primarily a distance freestyles, nearly stroke-for-stroke throughout the race, with Johnston touching 2nd in 9:00.88. Foster and Johnston also went 1-2 in the 400 IM, with Foster winning that 3:46.15 to 3:49.33.

The 200 free, arguably the Longhorns’ marquee event, proved to be another exciting race, as five men went 1:37. Coby Carrozza got his hand on the wall first after dropping a 23.93 final 50 and stopped the clock in 1:37.08. That final split took him past Jake Foster, who touched 2nd in 1:37.15. Behind those two, there was a three-way battle for 3rd, as freshman Tim Connery (1:37.70), junior Caspar Corbeau (1:37.84) and freshman Luke Hobson (1:37.89) all touched within two-tenths of a second of each other.

Incarnate Word’s Fabio Fasolo wasn’t too far behind the Longhorn quintet, taking 6th in 1:38.83, the only other man under 1:41 in the field. Later on, Fasolo actually won the 50 free  with a 20.48, and he also placed 2nd in the 100 free, touching in 44.24.

As evidenced by the 1000 free and the 200 free, Texas swimmers competed in a mix of their strong events and off events, which helped lead to some odd results.

Drew Kibler, who made the A-finals in the 500, 200, and 100 freestyles at the 2021 NCAA Championships, didn’t swim any of those events. Instead, he went with the 200 back and the 100 fly, events he has been known to swim at dual meets, winning the 200 back in 1:46.69 and taking 2nd in the 100 fly in 48.67.

Sprinter Daniel Krueger opted for the 100 back, taking 2nd in 50. 52, skipped the 50 free, an then won the 100 free in 43.76.

Meanwhile, Peter Larson, who’s primarily a middle-distance freestyler, but has a strong backstroke resume as well, won the 100 back in 49.63, and he also won the 500 free in 4:31.12. Carson Foster was disqualified for a false start after touching in 4:23.59.

The breaststroke, however, events went to guys who are primarily breastrokers. Charlie Scheinfeld won the 100 breast in 55.96 took the 100 breast in 55.96. Jake Foster, who made the B-final in the 200 breast at last year’s NCAAs, won that event today in 1:58,88, the only man to go under 2:03.

Tim Connery was the lone freshman to earn a win tonight; he came back on Kibler to win the 100 fly 48.08 to 48.67. He also had the fastest fly split in the field, rocking a 21.33 on Texas’ A relay, which finished 2nd in 1:29.32 behind the ‘B’ relay’s 1:28.88. Connery, Hobson, and Anthony Grimm, who swam the 50 free (21.07) and the 200 back (1:52.60) ranked among the top recruits in the high school class of 2021.

US Olympian Jordan Windle swept the 1m and 3m diving events for the Longhorns. Texas put a team under 1:20 in the 200 free relay to close out the night, with Caspar Corbeaus 19.66 anchor leg the fastest split in the field.

Texas Release

AUSTIN, Texas –  The Texas men’s Swimming and Diving team picked up where they left off the 2021 season, in winning fashion. The Longhorns hosted Incarnate Word at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center and earned 13 event wins in the occasion.

Friday’s season opener featured spectacular showings across the board to give Texas its first win of the season.

Meet Highlights

  • Jordan Windle captured both diving events at home in dazzling fashion with a score of 449.63 points in the 1-meter and 486.3 points in the 3-meter.
  • The Horns won the first swim event in the 200-yard medley relay with a combined time of 1:28.88 by Nathan Quarterman, Caspar Corbeau, Zachary Van Zandt and Danny Krueger.
  • The 1000-yard freestyle went to Carson Foster with his time of 8:59.93.
  • Coby Carrozza won his first event of the day in the 200-yard freestyle (1:37.08).
  • Drew Kibler’s time of 1:46.69 in the 200-yard backstroke gave the senior his first individual event win of the day.
  • The 200-yard breaststroke was won by Jake Foster’s time of 1:58.88, almost five seconds faster than his teammate in second.
  • Pete Larson won both the 100-yard backstroke (49.63) and the 500-yard freestyle (4:31.12).
  • Freshman Tim Connery debuted with an impressive time of 48.08 seconds in the 100-yard butterfly.

The Longhorns return to action on Oct. 15 in a dual meet at Texas A&M. Start time of the meet will be announced at a later date.

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Hswimmer
1 month ago

Would be interesting if he does the 500 at NCAA

Ledecky will go under 8 minutes in the 800
Reply to  Hswimmer
1 month ago

I could see 500 but maybe not 1650

ArtVanDeLegh10

He went 1:40 in the 200 IM as a Freshman. He’d have to be able to go around 4:06-4:07 to consider swimming the 500 Free. I doubt that’s happening. Remember last year 2 swimmers already went 4:06 and his teammate went 4:08.

Hswimmer
1 month ago

Or the 1,650

swimfan210_
1 month ago

Looks like Carson is starting to swim more longer freestyle events. Made the national team in the 400 free, going best times in the 500/1000 early in the season. I wonder what this means for him, I don’t think he will race the distance events tapered, but working on endurance will help the last 50 of his 400 IM, where he has been run down multiple times.

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  swimfan210_
1 month ago

Seems like Eddie likes to have a lot of his incoming stars swim the 500 free at NCAAs. Conger did it freshman year when he was a 1:55 LCM backstroker, Katz the same. He must believe that it’s an “aerobic base” thing that helps their primary events.

oxyswim
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

Conger was 4:13 in high school when guys were winning NCs in 4:10-4:11. Think it was just a matter of what they thought his best events were.

PsychoDad
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 month ago

That is consistant with Eddie’s opinion that age group swimmers should focus on long and slow swimming (aerobic base) and compete primarily in 500 free.

NCSwimFan
Reply to  swimfan210_
1 month ago

It would be interesting if he were to get to the 4:08-4:11 range in the 500 around midseason to see what Eddie does on that first (individual) day of NCAAs. 200 IM is by no means an automatic win with Gonzalez and Lasco both returning for Cal, and Magahey & Smith have the makings to be top two in the 500. Realistically could see third place in either event as a possibility, which could then depend on where the Texas team has a bigger hole.

Drama King
Reply to  NCSwimFan
1 month ago

Texas are loaded in 500.

Doconc
1 month ago

False start on 500???

So confused
Reply to  Doconc
1 month ago

I wondered the same thing. I hate it when a kid DQ off the start on a 1000 or 1650 and still swims it all. So terrible.

Thomas
1 month ago

Do divers ever dive “off events” or rather “off dives” maybe that are significantly easier or significantly more challenging from their routine lineup?

Astronaut
Reply to  Thomas
1 month ago

Yes. There are not many events in diving so choices are limited, the big one being springboards and or platform. Rarely would divers waste competition time doing super easy dives when they could be pushing the envelope and trying something new and more difficult that could get them more points.

Admin
Reply to  Thomas
1 month ago

I can’t say never, but culturally, no, not really.

Diving is so much about ‘prescision,’ that repetition of the same dives is more important than any value that would come from an ‘off’ event. Plus, if it’s not something you’re training regularly, there’s an increased risk of injury, especially when it comes to platform.

So you might occasionally see a diver who is working on a 7th dive or something, something they’re considering for NCAAs or similar, but in general you wouldn’t ‘try something’ at a meet. You’d ‘try something’ in practice, work to get really good at it, and then it wouldn’t really be an ‘off event’ when it came meet time.