2021 Women’s SEC Championships: Day 2 Finals Live Recap

SEC – WOMEN SWIMMING & DIVING + MEN’S DIVING

  • Wednesday, February 17 – Saturday, February 20, 2021
  • W Swimming: Gabrielsen Natatorium – Athens, GA (Eastern Time Zone)
  • W&M Diving: Mizzou Aquatics Center – Columbia, MO (Central Time Zone)
  • Defending Champion: Tennessee (1x) (2020 results)
  • Live results
  • Live Video – SEC Network
  • Championship Central
  • Psych Sheets (UPDATED)

Georgia, Kentucky, Alabama and Florida each had strong morning showings as the SEC battle will start to take shape tonight.

Courtney Harnish of Georgia will try to defend her 500 free title against Arkansas’s Peyton Palsha and SEC newcomer Kristen Stege, an East Carolina transfer already making waves at Tennessee. In the 200 IM, Zoie Hartman hopes to nab the 200 IM crown and add to Georgia’s win total as they try to overcome a tough 200 medley relay DQ last night.

The 50 free will see new talent emerge, as Florida sophomore and NC State transfer Katie Mack and Alabama junior Kalia Antoniou enter the final after dipping under 22 seconds for the first time in both their careers, while UGA certainly has a path to another win thanks to senior Gabi Fa’Amausili and freshman Maxine Parker in the A-final. The 200 free relay will also see all of these talents, as Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida and Mizzou could make this an incredibly tight finish.

500 FREE – FINALS

  • SEC meet record – 4:33.10, Brittany Maclean (Georgia) 2016
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 4:41.20
  • 2020 champion – Courtney Harnish (Georgia), 4:36.40

Top 3

  1. Courtney Harnish (Georgia) – 4:35.33
  2. Kristen Stege (Tennessee) – 4:38.38
  3. Peyton Palsha (Arkansas) – 4:38.97

Courtney Harnish looked smooth and calculated in this race, going out in 1:48.4 and defending her 2020 (and 2019) titles with a winning time of 4:35.33 and hitting the ‘A’ cut. She now sits #2 in the nation behind UVA’s Paige Madden (4:33.09). That’s a best for Harnish, eclipsing her old PR of 4:35.52 from 2019 SECs.

That makes the 12th UGA win in this event of the last 16 seasons in this event, though Harnish is the only Bulldog to defend a 500 free title, let alone three-peat.

Locked in a battle for second in lanes five and six, respectively, Tennessee’s Kristen Stege and Arkansas’s Peyton Palsha traded leads on the other. Stege, though, was 28.0 on the penultimate 50 and then 27.25 coming home, able to come back on Palsha and ultimately pass her.

Florida sophomore Tylor Mathieu was a couple of hundredths quicker than Stege on the final 50 (27.21), and she turned in a fourth-place effort of 4:39.21, a huge lifetime best to improve on her 4:42.10 from this meet last year. It’s a big jump for Mathieu from last year, though, where she was 18th overall.

Alabama’s Kensey McMahon got right up to the 4:40 barrier, taking fifth in 4:40.06.

Auburn junior Emily Hetzer took the B-final in 4:41.31, ahead of a charging Kaylee Williams (4:42.33). Williams, the Kentucky freshman, lopped about two seconds off of her old best.

After biding her time over the first half of the race, Texas A&M senior Camryn Toney dropped a second off of her lifetime best and won the C-final by over a second in 4:44.12.

200 IM – FINALS

  • SEC meet record – 1:51.62, Meghan Small (Tennessee) 2019
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 1:57.31
  • 2020 champion – Meghan Small (Tennessee), 1:52.14

Top 3

  1. Zoie Hartman (Georgia) – 1:53.68
  2. Vanessa Pearl (Florida) – 1:54.72
  3. Alexis Yager (Tennessee) – 1:55.67

Zoie Hartman laid waste to the field (aside from her teammate Danielle Dellatorre) on the breaststroke leg, emerging as the first to the wall at the 150 mark as she took it home with a win (1:53.68). Dellatorre took fourth in 1:55.74.

Florida’s Vanessa Pearl was 1:54.72 to take the silver, as Tennessee’s Alexis Yager edged Dellatorre for bronze (1:55.67).

Kentucky nabbed fifth, sixth and eighth in the final led by Lauren Poole (1:56.25).

At 1:56.80, Gracie Felner hit a new lifetime best to take the C-final in an Alabama school record and take over two seconds off of her old best. Another Alabama freshman, Diana Petkova was 1:56.92 to win the B-final as both were under Cat Wright‘s record of 1:57.65; Wright also was under it with a 1:57.62 in the B-final.

50 FREE – FINALS

  • SEC meet record – 21.03, Erika Brown (Tennessee) 2020
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 22.21
  • 2020 champion – Erika Brown (Tennessee), 21.03
  1. Kalia Antoniou (Alabama) – 21.69
  2. Cora Dupre (Alabama) – 21.82
  3. Katie Mack (Florida) – 21.85

Alabama was hot here, with Kalia Antoniou and Cora Dupre both clocking lifetime bests to go 1-2 in the final. Antoniou’s 21.69 establishes a new Alabama school record, with Dupre’s 21.82 also getting under the old record of 21.84 held by Bailey Scott.

Last year, Antoniou tied for 13th overall, so it’s an impressive swing for her as the Crimson Tide looks like the team to beat in the 200 free relay. Antoniou is now #3 nationally.

Alabama’s last (and only) 50 free title in the SEC is from 1983, won by Carol Landry. It was the third year of women’s swimming in the conference.

Prelims leader Katie Mack of Florida was third in 21.85, while Georgia freshman Maxine Parker was under 22 for the first time ever for fourth (21.93).

After missing the wall this morning in prelims, delegating her to the B-final, Sarah Thompson unleashed a 21.57 to win the B-final by a landslide. She’s now #2 in the nation, and she beat the entire A-final tonight while coming .04 off of her best.

In the C-final, Amy Feddersen, a Missouri sophomore, won with a new best of 22.35.

200 FREE RELAY – TIMED FINAL

  • SEC meet record – 1:25.41, Auburn 2020
  • 2021 NCAA auto qualifying standard – 1:28.43
  • 2020 champion – Auburn, 1:25.41

Top 3

  1. Alabama – 1:27.02
  2. Missouri – 1:27.36
  3. Tennessee – 1:28.00

We didn’t see quite the same speed as Auburn’s 1:25.41 last year, but the Alabama women got the job done here with a 1:27.02 as three women split under 22 seconds.

Kalia Antoniou, the 50 free champion, was out in 21.82, followed by Morgan Scott (21,56), Flora Molnar (22.21) and Cora Dupre (21.43). They swam their relay in the second of three heats, and waited out the third heat to find out that they were champions. Like in the 50 free, this is Alabama’s first SEC victory in this event since 1983.

Sarah Thompson was great leading Mizzou to the heat three win, going 21.65 for another 21-mid tonight. Megan Keil (21.77) and Amy Feddersen (21.85) were the middle legs, with Alex Moderski anchoring (22.09).

Tennessee took third in 1:28.00, getting a 21.68 anchor from Bailey Grinter, while Florida (1:28.50) and Georgia (1:28.61) took fourth and fifth. UF had a 21.68 second leg from Talia Bates, while Bulldogs Maxine Parker (21.65) and Zoie Hartman (21.90) were under 22 with flying starts.

Notably, defending champions Auburn sank all the way to 11th, their time of 1:31.80 over six seconds slower than the team was at this meet last year.

TEAM SCORES

Through day two finals (UPDATED TO INCLUDE DIVING)

  1. Florida 448
  2. Georgia 365
  3. Alabama 357
  4. Tennessee 348
  5. Kentucky 343
  6. Texas A&M 334
  7. Arkansas 325
  8. Mizzou 253
  9. LSU 198
  10. Auburn 188
  11. South Carolina 145
  12. Vanderbilt 94

In This Story

72
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
72 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Bub
7 months ago

Anyone got a link?

PLEASE HELP
Reply to  Bub
7 months ago

Yes, there’s a livestream but it still only shows 6 lanes 🙁 The swimmers in the stands are blocking the view of the pool. SEC please help us watch the meet since we can’t be there in person!

Last edited 7 months ago by PLEASE HELP
TXdad
Reply to  Bub
7 months ago

Sling TV has ACCNX as an option. Only way I could find to see it with Google fiber ISP (or no ISP).

kristen stege super fan
7 months ago

kristen ur my idol i love you

VFL
7 months ago

Nooooo don’t curse Kristen!

monsterbasher
Reply to  VFL
7 months ago

Bruh. The curse is real.

VFL
Reply to  monsterbasher
7 months ago

Lol nahh that was a great swim! She looked a lot shorter than she did this morning but girl is a racer!

VFL
7 months ago

Literally can’t see lane 1 swim at all.

Deepsouth
Reply to  VFL
7 months ago

I cannot figure what the SEC network is doing on this stream. There’s plenty of places in that pool to set up that are better than this.

Last edited 7 months ago by Deepsouth
VFL
Reply to  Deepsouth
7 months ago

If this Florida girl don’t put down that stupid inflatable gator….

Ghost
Reply to  Deepsouth
7 months ago

Agree. It could be worse. The ACC this morning tried to show men’s diving, women’s diving and swimming…all 3 at same time.

VFL
7 months ago

Tjasa’s freestyle looks so good. 😍 Wonder is she would’ve done better in the 50 or 500, but looking forward to her 100/200!

DWY
7 months ago

Good use of penultimate.

Partial Observer
Reply to  DWY
7 months ago

That seems to be a go to word for SwimSwam, but I like it!

PVSFree
Reply to  Partial Observer
7 months ago

Only so many ways you can describe a swim race and after doing it hundreds of times, you fall into habits

THEO
7 months ago

That makes the 12th UGA win in this event of the last 16 seasons in this event, though Harnish is the only Bulldog to defend a 500 free title, let alone three-peat.” == a remarkably specific statistic to just casually have on hand. Idk what kind of data tables SwimSwam is working with but I am impressed. Best swim journalism in the history of the sport by a landslide.

SEC Fan
7 months ago

These people screaming are so obnoxious!!

wow
Reply to  SEC Fan
7 months ago

Its the Mizzou swimmers section. It’s literally not even cheering at this point. It sounds like they are screaming bloody murder. Its beyond obnoxious and does not represent Mizzou well. They don’t even cheer names, it’s literally after the start gun goes off they start screeching just to be loud and obnoxious. And of course they had to sit RIGHT by the livestream. Yikes.

Lord Farquad
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

According to my calculations based on critical thinking and deductive reasoning I’d conclude that you are extremely upset.

Ok Boomer
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

wow! you must be fun at parties!

Last edited 7 months ago by Ok Boomer
ZOUSTYLE
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

Sounds like a you problem

Partial Observer
Reply to  ZOUSTYLE
7 months ago

Seems like your ZouStyle is stronger than their KarenStyle.

El Primo
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

There’s an easy fix to that! You should start by turning up your volume and then go sit right next to the speaker on full blast. This way you can hear the announcer really well and then no one has to hear what you say!

Bull
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

According to my calculations based on critical thinking and deductive reasong I’d conclude that you are extremely pissed

Lord Farquad
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

Wow, Who took a dump in your cornflakes?

Bull
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

What happened to you as a child?

Traps lord
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

Yeah I just hate seeing teams that have team spirit and come to finals ready to be loud and supportive. I just hate to see it.

Ghost
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

They sound and act like 12 year olds

CastleBuilders
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

Yep, the Women’s Mizzou Swim and Dive Team has built a fully fortified castle in your head. With working drawbridge and gate!

collegeswammer
Reply to  CastleBuilders
7 months ago

too bad they are in 8th

aziswim
Reply to  wow
7 months ago

ok boomer

vst5911
Reply to  SEC Fan
7 months ago

The screaming is really bad. I’m all for being excited but it’s not cheering for the team it’s loud screeching…I have to agree with others its really difficult to watch with volume on at all.

ZOUSTYLE
Reply to  vst5911
7 months ago

Athletes rotate seating sections at this meet so unfortunately for you, you will be hearing a team in the mics every session.

Rhaggy
Reply to  vst5911
7 months ago

How do you survive going to swim meets, especially the usual blasting volume of a combined SECs, if you think this is loud?

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

Read More »