Georgia Head Coach Jack Bauerle Won’t Be at Either NCAA Championship Meet

  16 Braden Keith | March 19th, 2014 | College, Featured, SEC

There is still a lot of mystery, a lot of rumor, and a lot of general head-scratching about the continued absence of Georgia head men’s and women coach Jack Bauerle, but today we were able to get confirmation of at least one fact: Bauerle will “not be with the women’s team in Minneapolis or the men in Austin,” according to a team spokesperson, who also said that there was “no change in his status.”

We do know, according to several confirmed sources, that Bauerle does have his own attorney in this matter. That indicates that things have progressed beyond a simple internal investigation, and jives with the fact that almost three months later, there hasn’t been any conclusion to the matter of Bauerle’s suspension, nor any additional information released.

This status for NCAA’s is different for that employed at the SEC Championships. At SEC’s, Bauerle was allowed on deck during warmups, and then had to move either to his office (Georgia hosted that meet) or into the stands during the competition.

Comments

  1. joe Momma says:
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    Very unfortunate. I hope this ends well for him.

  2. Swimmer/Floater says:
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    Depending on the situation, both or all parties may need to retain an attorney as a matter of course. At that point, all or most communication stops until the situation is resolved. Hopefully the process continues and any issues get resolved quickly and amicably. Unfortunately, it looks like things are on a wait and see basis until the process is complete. If there was something terrible going on, Jack would already be gone, period. Looks, to me, like an obscure NCAA rules violation pulled from the many pages of NCAA rules and regulations. Let’s get this resolved quickly, so Jack can get back on deck to let Jack do what Jack does best.

  3. Joel Lin says:
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    Always such a sad sight to see sides lawyer up, and then the lawyers “manage” the conflict by portraying it. Worst day of an attorney’s life is to see a dispute resolved. I too pray to see Coach back on thr desk where he belongs.

  4. BustemBucky says:
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    Let’s all be honest – he’s toast.

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    If this has anything to with NCAA policies, I’m sure its bogus because they’re a bunch of bumbling hypocrites. The NCAA needs a huge overhaul and an external source to fix it because we can’t expect them to investigate themselves properly. Just my HUMBLE opinion.

  6. ArtVanDeLegh10 says:
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    It must be pretty bad if he isn’t allowed at NCAAs, more than just a technicality.

  7. Mark Nedza says:
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    If this was more than a mere technicality, then this “toast” would have been buttered and served already. The way I see it, it’s CYA time for all parties concerned, including the UGA Athletic Department. Good luck to Jack ……and his swimmers.

    And, Go Dawgs!

  8. Ted Greve says:
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    As a lawyer, I can only tell you that there are certain protocols that must be followed. One is likely to have no or restricted contact while matters are being investigated. The human psyche tends to be gears towards thinking the worst….sad but true. I am glad that Jack has appropriate representation and the matter will be disposed of in due course. This is a little personal for me as I have known Jack for almost 40 years. I know him to be a man of integrity and that is the reason that I will not jump to any unfounded or baseless conclusion. I pray for patience before judgement.

  9. mark.h.nedza@facebook.com Nedza says:
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    Let the big Dawg swim! Let’s see what happens between those two concrete walls!

  10. NCAASwimAlum says:
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    To all trying to let Jack off the hook for this, if the stories that are being widely reported are true – shame on you. Off course Jack deserves his day in court, but the accusations are pretty bad – stuff related to academic fraud – nothing that should just be brushed off as “technicalities.” There’s always going to be people out there who blindly will support him (look at Rick Curl), but if a college coach is helping kids cheat to stay eligible, then there’s absolutely zero excuse for that.

    With that being said, I hope the accusations are false. But if they’re true, I’m not giving it a pass based on “oh the NCAA is awful”.

    • duckduckgoose says:
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      Sincerely hope this ends well for Jack and Georgia. It always sounds ominous when attorneys are involved, but if there were evidence of academic fraud, how could the swimmer involved be cleared to compete?

      • joe Momma says:
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        DDG,

        “He who gets the finish line first usually wins” as a criminal defense attorney once told me. In this case it means that if the allegations concern current swimmers, the swimmers probably struck a deal with UGA and / or NCAA that will allow them to compete, as long as they assisted in the case against Bauerle. It will be interesting to see which current swimmers with remaining eligibility remain at UGA if Bauerle is dismissed.

        My undeducated guess is that UGA may be trying to strike a fine balance (allowing him to coach but not be on the pool deck) while the allegations are investigated, so as not to jeopardize its scholarship swimmers who enrolled at UGA specifically to swim for Bauerle.

        UGA might also be giving Bauerle time to sort out his affairs and permit him a “graceful” exit.

    • Thomas Romano says:
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      I can’t believe you brought Rick Curl’s name into this conversation. Two totally different situations which I’m sure you’d agree. I know your using his name as an example of neglect and turning the other cheek but Curl’s story and this are not even in the same ballpark. If Jack did something wrong then come out with it. No need to drag this on any longer. But what a waste if this turns out to be nothing. Not to mention the senior swimmers who may not swim again to be left with this as one of their final memories. Oh, and yes, the NCAA hypocrisy will still continue. Its all about the athlete while gorging their pockets with cash made off the athlete.

    • YouMakeMarkEmmertProud says:
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      “Widely reported”? “Stuff related to academic fraud”? Those are both spectacularly vague and imprecise statements. Feel free to produce any official NCAA, SEC, or UGAA “accusation” statement. Your bold and accusatory speech without identifying yourself is cowardice. Unless you’re privy to some insight that you feel willing to share with us, why don’t you take your wild conjecture elsewhere.

    • YouMakeMarkEmmertProud says:
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      “Widely reported”? “Stuff related to academic fraud”? Those are both spectacularly vague and imprecise statements. Feel free to produce any official NCAA, SEC, or UGAA “accusation” statement. Your bold and accusatory speech without identifying yourself is cowardice. Unless you’re privy to some insight that you feel willing to share with us, why don’t you take your conjecture elsewhere.

  11. Keith Moore says:
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    Please look at the Motivation of the Athletic Director first. The NCAA rules are there to protect the athlete, not the coach.
    The Athletic Department will open a file and conduct an investigation; weather there was anything wrong or not. The investigation will include interviews (interrogations) of any one connected to the program (including the athletes). If something is stated in these interviews (factual or not) it will be assumed there is guilt. Even if it is hearsay. The Athletic Director, will make the decision (maybe already had prior to the investigation starting).
    A self report will be given to the NCAA. (any self punishments given).The Committee on Infractions the will review and the Coach can be represented at hearing. (the institution will be represented as well).
    This is not a court of law or even the legal system. You’re are in a position to have to prove you did not do what you were accused of….

    A coach can be terminated even if there was a secondary violation (old terms) had occurred.
    The Lawyer up is a good thing, but it is there to protect the coach and his employment. However, let’s say if the alleged accusations were disproven by the lawyers, Jack can maintain is employment as per his contract. I would find it doubtful the Athletic Director will renew the contract (why would he?).

    NOTE: if the NCAA finds no unethical conduct (meaning no wrong doing)….his reputation will be tarnished..

    Jack…..when this goes to the NCAA committee on infractions I know a name of a great NCAA Attorney.

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